Previously Unseen Pics of The Beatles and Clapton

They were the musical icons of their age, watched on stage by millions of enraptured fans and famously photographed from every angle.

Now, however, a new set of intimate pictures showing George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Mick Jagger and other 60s rock stars have emerged.

Taken by Pattie Boyd, the model and photographer who was married to Harrison before leaving him for Clapton, inspiring his album Layla, they offer a small glimpse into the mesmerizing lives of some of their subjects.

Notorious Rolling Stones party animal Ronnie Wood is show calmly finishing a painting, Harrison himself reclines shirtless on a bed, a pair of sunglasses resting at his elbow, Mick Jagger and Clapton chat on a natty sofa backstage at the JFK arena before the Live Aid concert.

Boyd, now 69, gathered the remarkable collection of negatives together for an exhibit at the at the San Francisco Art Exchange which begins on Tuesday and will remain until March 15. 

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Pattie Boyd, who compiled the collection of photographs, poses alongside her first husband and Beatles guitarist George Harrison who she married in January 1966. They are pictured in their garden in Kinfauns, Surrey, where they moved shortly before tying the knot
Pattie Boyd, who compiled the collection of photographs, poses alongside her first husband and Beatles guitarist George Harrison who she married in January 1966. They are pictured in their garden in Kinfauns, Surrey, where they moved shortly before tying the knot
Eric Clapton (pictured) became firm friends with George Harrison in the late 60s, but also fell in love with Boyd and his 1970 album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs was inspired by her, in particular the title track. They married in 1979
Eric Clapton (pictured) became firm friends with George Harrison in the late 60s, but also fell in love with Boyd and his 1970 album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs was inspired by her, in particular the title track. They married in 1979

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The Beatles Secretary Opens Up

They don’t make many girls like Freda Kelly any more. They really don’t.

But, then, her attitudes were forged in an age that’s past, a monochrome time of shining, cobbled Liverpool streets, of girls from the typing pool whose highest ambition was to become a secretary because that was pretty well the limit in a man’s world, of a daughter’s selfless devotion to a loved parent, and of an employee’s unbending loyalty to her boss.

Freda’s employer was a young man called Brian Epstein and her job was to run the Official Beatles Fan Club.

The newspapers of the 1960s called her the luckiest girl in the world. For ten years Freda Kelly worked as personal secretary and fan club manager for the biggest band in history
The newspapers of the 1960s called her the luckiest girl in the world. For ten years Freda Kelly worked as personal secretary and fan club manager for the biggest band in history

 

Though Freda (pictured with Ringo Starr and George Harrison) was a trusted member of the band's inner circle, she has never before gone on record to speak about her integral role in Beatlemania
Though Freda (pictured with Ringo Starr and George Harrison) was a trusted member of the band’s inner circle, she has never before gone on record to speak about her integral role in Beatlemania

It was she thinks, the best job in the world, and back in the Sixties half the teenage girls in the country, if not the Western world, would probably have agreed.

Yet for the past 50 years she’s hardly ever talked about her role with the Beatles, neither in private with her children nor in public, and has rejected all bribes and attempts for her to write the real insiders book.

And even if she wasn’t always present at the juicier moments of the Beatles’ story she would have had a wonderful inside track on the gossip.

Yet, in all that time, there’s been hardly a word. read more

Harrison With Sitar Idol

Small collection of photographs featuring George Harrison with his friend and Sitar master Ravi Shankar

Ravi Shankar with Beatle George Harrison and his wife, model Patti BoydRavi Shankar with Beatle George Harrison and his wife, model Patti Boyd

Beatle George Harrison, Ravi ShankarBeatle George Harrison, Ravi Shankar

Roger McGuinn, the founder of the Byrds, earlier told the Telegraph how he had introduced the late George Harrison to Ravi Shankar's sitar music at a party at Zsa Zsa Gabor's Bel Air mansion in 1965.Roger McGuinn, the founder of the Byrds, earlier told the Telegraph how he had introduced the late George Harrison to Ravi Shankar’s sitar music at a party at Zsa Zsa Gabor’s Bel Air mansion in 1965

George Harrison (right) had grown fascinated with the sitar, Shankar (left)George Harrison (right) had grown fascinated with the sitar, Shankar (left)

George Harrison with Ravi Shankar in the 1970sGeorge Harrison with Ravi Shankar in the 1970s

Fab Four Can Heat You Up

Feeling nostalgic about days gone by can make us feel warmer, new research has claimed.

The study investigated the effects of nostalgic feelings on reaction to cold and the perception of warmth.

The volunteers, from universities in China and the Netherlands, took part in one of five studies.

Researchers say that recalling nostalgic events can actually make people feel warmerResearchers say that recalling nostalgic events can actually make people feel warmer

The first asked participants to keep an account of their nostalgic feelings over 30 days.

Results showed they felt more nostalgic on colder days.

The second study put participants in one of three rooms: cold (20C, 68F), comfortable (24C, 75F) and hot (28C, 82F), and then measured how nostalgic they felt.

Participants felt more nostalgic in the cold room than in the comfortable and hot rooms.

The third study used music to evoke nostalgia to see if it was linked to warmth.

The participants who said the music made them feel nostalgic also tended to say that the music made them feel physically warmer.

The fourth study tested the effect of nostalgia on physical warmth by placing participants in a cold room and instructing them to recall either a nostalgic or ordinary event from their past.

They were then asked to guess the temperature of the room.

Those who recalled a nostalgic event perceived the room they were in to be warmer.

Study five again instructed participants to recall either a nostalgic or ordinary event from their past.

Researchers found that even listening to nostalgic music, such as the Beatles, can make us feel slightly warmerResearchers found that even listening to nostalgic music, such as the Beatles, can make us feel slightly warmer

They then placed their hand in ice-cold water to see how long they could stand it.

Findings showed that the volunteers who indulged in nostalgia held their hand in the water for longer.

Dr Tim Wildschut, senior lecturer at the University of Southampton and co-author of the study, said: ‘Nostalgia is experienced frequently and virtually by everyone and we know that it can maintain psychological comfort.

‘For example, nostalgic reverie can combat loneliness.’

‘We wanted to take that a step further and assess whether it can also maintain physiological comfort.

‘Our study has shown that nostalgia serves a homeostatic function, allowing the mental simulation of previously enjoyed states, including states of bodily comfort; in this case making us feel warmer or increasing our tolerance of cold.

‘More research is now needed to see if nostalgia can combat other forms of physical discomfort, besides low temperature.’

The study, published in the journal Emotion, was carried out in collaboration with researchers from Sun Yat-Sen University and Tilburg University.

Attribution: Mark Prigg

Still Fab

Their cries were said to have been deafening to the band with their tears having run from the eyes of the first to witness  the Beatles play in America.

Appearing in newly released photos of the Beatles’ first concert in the U.S. are these adoring young women whose cries, tears and screams took their passion to a never before seen new level.

Turning the cameras from the Washington D.C. Coliseum’s small island stage and back on to their crowd are the googly eyed women showcasing the all-out hysterics of Beatlemania.

Beyond adoring: Screaming and wailing, the first Beatle fans to witness the band perform in the U.S. in 1964 are pictured The first Beatle  fans to witness the band perform in the U.S. in 1964 are pictured
Overwhelming affection: A young woman slaps her hands to her face while screaming making up a room full of cries that prevented the band from hearing themselves playA young woman slaps her hands to  her face while screaming making up a room full of cries that prevented the band  from hearing themselves play

Taken by a rookie 18-year-old  photographer  in February of 1964, the iconic images show the band at the start of their  American invasion, just two days after appearing on the  Ed Sullivan Show in New  York.

Ten days earlier the band had gone to number  one for the first time stateside with ‘I want to hold your hand’– the first of  59 weeks they would spend at the top over the next six  and a half  years.

Mike  Mitchell was there, shooting photos  from just feet away and even jumping onto the stage for the group’s pre-concert  press call.

Among the highlights is a backlit shot of the band that he took while standing directly behind them.

Auctioned off in July of 2011, that photo made $68,500. Its pre-sale estimate was $2,000 to $3,000.

Girls on a mission: Dressed otherwise civil, the girls in skirts, collared shirts and cardigans lose themselves two days after the band appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show in New York
Not published in LIFE. Fans at the first Beatles concert in America, Washington, DC, Feb. 11, 1964.
While dressed otherwise civil in skirts, collared shirts and cardigans, the girls soon lose themselves two days after seeing the band appear on the Ed Sullivan Show in New York
Enthusiastic welcome: No use covering their mouths, the girls' cries swamped the small island stage welcoming the Fab Four to Washington, D.C.Enthusiastic welcome: No use covering their mouths, the  girls’ cries swamped the small island stage welcoming the Fab Four to  Washington, D.C.

An image of an animated Ringo Starr on the drums sold for $8,125. It was estimated to bring $3,000 to $5,000.

Auction house Christie’s said the shot  depicts a rare moment where Starr was  both drummer and lead singer on a song  written by Paul McCartney and  John Lennon, but made famous by The Rolling  Stones, ‘I Wanna Be Your Man’.

Cathy Elkies, Christie’s director of iconic collections, said she expected the bids to exceed the pre-sale estimates.

‘Beatles fans are fierce. To uncover this trove of images that’s never been published will really excite people,’ she  said.

Also included in the sale were photos of the  band’s September 13 1964, performance at the Baltimore Civic  Center.

Mr Mitchell said he was given unrestricted  access to the band’s concert in Washington DC.

Mad About the Boys: Rare Photos of Beatles Fans, 1964
Stan Wayman/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
The start of something: Ringo Starr sings and plays the drums at the concert, which came ten days after the band’s first number one hit in the U.S.
U.S. invasion: The photos capture a young Paul McCartney and John Lennon at the start of BeatlemaniaThe photos capture a young Paul McCartney  and John Lennon at the start of Beatlemania
Top dollar: A silhouette of the Fab Four captures the Beatles at their start as part of a larger collection of photos that sold at auction for $361,938 in July of 2011 A silhouette of the Fab Four captures the  Beatles at their start as part of a larger collection of photos that sold at  auction for $361,938 in July of 2011

‘It was a long time ago. Things weren’t that way then,’ said the  65-year-old, who now works as an art photographer in Washington.

‘It was as low-tech as the concert itself.  The concert was in a sports venue and the sound system was the sound system of  a sports venue.’

Equally astonishing is how few other photographs from that first concert exist.

Simeon Lipman, Christie’s pop culture consultant, said it’s not clear why there weren’t many other photos of the  concert.

He said Mr Mitchell’s black and white photographs were remarkable for their ‘animated” and ‘intimate’ depiction of the  Fab Four.

Mr Mitchell stored the negatives for years in  a box in his basement and used digital technology to scan and restore the  prints for the auction.

‘They benefit from a historical perspective,’  he said

Attribution: Dail Mail

Lennon

The famous mop-top haircut, leather jacket and guitar are gone, replaced by military fatigues and army boots. Yet the slight young man enjoying a game of cricket in the desert is unmistakable.

The pictures of John Lennon, taken in 1966 and seen here for the first time, show him on the set of the film How I Won The War during a brief break from The Beatles. Directed by Richard Lester, who also made A Hard Day’s Night and Help! with the Fab Four, the film offered Lennon, then 26, a serious acting role.

It also gave him a rare opportunity to escape from his increasingly enervating life with The Beatles, who were at the peak of their fame and besieged by screaming fans wherever they went.

...and now it's his chance to shine with the bat
…and now it’s his chance to shine with the bat
 
Having a laugh: Previously unseen pictures of The Beatles star John Lennon on the film set of 'How I Won The War' in Almeria, Spain in 1966
Having a laugh: Previously unseen pictures of The Beatles star John Lennon on the film set of ‘How I Won The War’ in Almeria, Spain in 1966

It had been a stressful year for Lennon. In March of that year, he had caused worldwide outrage with his comment in an interview that The Beatles were ‘more popular than Jesus’. Partly as a result of the public backlash, particularly in America, their tour of the US that August would be their last.

Just a month later he was on the set of the film, in which he played Private Gripweed, alongside Some Mothers Do ’Ave ’Em star Michael Crawford in the lead role.

An absurdist comedy, it was set in North Africa during the Second World War, although its anti-war message was seen as a commentary on the situation in Vietnam, which was escalating at the time.

Photographer Zdenko Hirschler visited the blisteringly hot set in Andalusia, Spain, arriving during a tea break in which Lennon displayed his legendary dry wit. Hirschler said Lennon was holding a cup of tea and a sandwich.

‘He told me, “See? One does not have to be a star to get a sandwich and a tea – but it helps to get you to the front of the waiting line.”

‘In spite of his military uniform, he looked like a young student – fresh, clean and happy. He was 26 but looked like a teenager.’

 
John Lennon
John Lennon 
 

He was thrilled to be involved in the film, in which he first wore the round glasses which would become his trademark, hoping acting might provide him with a new direction.

He told Hirschler: ‘No more travelling, no more tours. We are going to split, for a while at least.’

Paul McCartney and girlfriend Jane Asher had decided to take a trip to Africa, George Harrison and his wife Patti went to India and Ringo Starr and wife Maureen were visiting relatives in England. ‘I wanted to try a new life – maybe acting could be a new solution, a new adventure,’ Lennon said.

Towards the end of the film, Lennon’s character dies after being shot four times. Lennon initially refused to take part in the scene, revealing that he was haunted by fears of an unnatural death. He told Lester he was concerned about an ‘eerie prophecy’ which he said ‘may mean violent death for me later on’. His fears came true in 1980 when Mark Chapman shot him five times on the doorstep of his home in New York.

 
Playtime: Lennon takes some time out to have a bowl, playing some form of cricket

 

 The film drew lukewarm reviews on its release but Lennon’s performance was praised. Lennon wrote one of The Beatles’ most famous songs, Strawberry Fields Forever, during breaks from filming, and that November the band reconvened to begin recording their masterpiece, Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Despite Lennon’s hope that How I Won The War would lead to other roles, it was his first – and last – non-Beatles film.

The Beatles? … Next Generation

Sir Paul McCartney’s son James said he would be willing to form a ‘next generation’ Beatles with the sons of the other band members.

The 34-year-old said he was “up for it” and John Lennon’s son, Sean, and George Harrison’s son, Dhani, had also shown support for the idea, although Ringo Starr’s son, drummer Zak, was less keen.

James told the BBC: “I don’t think it’s something that Zak wants to do.

“Maybe Jason [another of Starr’s sons and also a drummer] would want to do it.

“I’d be up for it. Sean seemed to be into it, Dhani seemed to be into it. I’d be happy to do it.”

James said that the idea had already been mooted “a little bit”.

Asked if a new Beatles could happen, he said: “Yeah, hopefully, naturally. I don’t know, you’d have to wait and see. The will of God, nature’s support, I guess. So yeah, maybe.”

The singer-songwriter, who’s played guitar on two his father’s albums Flaming Pie and Driving Rain, is following in his father’s footsteps by playing a gig at Liverpool’s famous Cavern Club on Tuesday.

The Cavern is where the Beatles played dozens of gigs before hitting the big time.

James said is had been “beautiful” working with his father, who co-produced two of his EPs, including sessions at the Abbey Road studios.

Asked about his relationship with Sir Paul, he said: “It’s amazing. Sometimes in the past, a few years ago, it can be difficult, it can be tense, like families can get.

But beyond that it’s beautiful. “He’s a genius, he’s beyond genius, and he’s a big inspiration. Very intellectual and obviously amazing at what he does, so it’s great fun.

He helps me get in tune with myself and be the best person that I can be.”

James admitted that having the name McCartney was “a help” in the music business and it was “an honour” to be connected to his father.

He said that as a schoolboy he’d dreamt of “being better than The Beatles”, adding: “I’m not sure if I can do that. If anything, I would love to be equal to The Beatles – but even that’s quite tough.”

All of the Beatles boys have taken after their fathers. McCartney has played guitar on two of his father’s albums, and is playing a show at the Cavern Club in Liverpool, where the Beatles cut their teeth.

Starkey has drummed for the likes of The Who and Oasis, Harrison is the frontman of thenewno2 and Lennon is a successful singer-songwriter in New York.

Attribution: Daily Telegraph, HuffPo