Rush Began a Movement that Isn’t Going Away

by: Brent Smith

Most know, as Rush said a thousand times, where we were the first time we heard his dulcet tones emanating from our radio. I certainly do. 

I was in the passenger seat of my father’s car. We were on the highway somewhere around Philadelphia. I don’t know why we were there – must have had something to do with my Navy service. He must have been picking me up from the airport or something.

In any event, he was listening to this guy on the radio. I don’t recall what this guy was talking about, but I remember him being brash and loud and I asked dad who the hell this guy was. He said it was a guy named Rush. I think the year was 1988 – Rush’s first year. I’ was hooked.

And unlike many who came before and will come after, he will be the voice that lives on, timelessly.

from the American Thinker:

Radio Free America – Rush’s Legacy

During the dark days of the Cold War, eastern Europeans were isolated from the rest of the world behind what was warmly referred to as the Iron Curtain.  Everything behind the Iron Curtain was autocratically ruled by the Soviet Union.  As part of its effort to control the populace, all regional news outlets (print and broadcast) were in fact, state-sponsored propaganda outlets.

The only exception to the blackout of truthful news was a powerful network of transmitters in western Europe, known as Radio Free Europe.  This network of transmitters broadcast news and entertainment deep into eastern Europe.  In addition to broadcasting the truth to those under communist rule, it also provided hope and a vision of what was outside of communist rule.  It was instrumental in preparing those behind the Iron Curtain for the eventual downfall of the Soviet Union.

Unfortunately, while we were fighting propaganda overseas, citizens back home were subjected to a uniquely American version of propaganda.  For decades — before the internet and satellite TV — news in America was controlled by a select few entities, all of which were closely aligned with the Democrat party.  ABC, NBC, CBS, and CNN controlled television and radio news.  The New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe, and Los Angeles Times set the tone for printed news.

The media and leftist politicians they supported were creating narratives to shape public opinion.  They crafted their narratives by being selective in what news they presented, or by outright distortion of facts.  I remember watching Dan Rather on the CBS nightly news in the early 1980s when he read a suicide note on the air.  The author of the note stated that he was committing suicide because Ronald Reagan had taken away his welfare benefits.  This was followed by a series of stories about the damage Reagan’s economic policies were having on the poor in America.  There was no mention of how those policies had also benefited millions.  This was just one of many narratives being crafted for American consumption.

Read more