Using Synthetic DNA for Date Storage

The US Declaration of Independence and the UCI seal were transcribed to a solution of TNA and then recovered
The US Declaration of Independence and the UCI seal were transcribed to a solution of TNA and then recovered
Steve Zylius/UCI

A team of researchers led by professor of pharmaceutical sciences John Chaputa at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) is developing methods for storing vast amounts of data on strands of synthetic DNA that are much tougher than natural DNA. The technique has already been used to encode the US Declaration of Independence on a single molecule. read more

The Solar System’s First Luxury Space Hotel

The Voyager Space Station would be a 700-foot diameter rotating ring space station, spinning slowly to create artificial gravity roughly equal to that on the moon
The Voyager Space Station would be a 700-foot diameter rotating ring space station, spinning slowly to create artificial gravity roughly equal to that on the moon
Orbital Assembly Corporation

California’s Orbital Assembly Corporation reckons it will soon have the solar system’s first luxury space hotel open in orbit, offering spacewalks, Beyonce concerts and fine dining to space tourists at US$5 million for three and a half days. read more

Discovery a New Type of Bone Cell

Researchers have discovered a new type of bone cell, which could change our understanding of conditions like osteoporosis
Researchers have discovered a new type of bone cell, which could change our understanding of conditions like osteoporosis

By taking their microscopes to the skeletal structures of the human body, scientists in Australia have unearthed an entirely new type of bone cell, one they believe may play an important role in the development of various bone diseases. The new cell switches on a number of unique genes, shedding new light on the way bones degenerate and reform and opening up new possibilities for the treatment of conditions like osteoporosis.

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COVID Variant Strains – Another Convenient Cry of Wolf

by: Brent Smith

In January of this this year I posted a piece on World Net Daily explaining how I was not at all convinced that new strains of COVID-19 even existed.

I expressed it as just another excuse to keep us masked-up and locked down.

Can you blame any of us for being, at the very least, skeptical, “after all the misstatements, half-truths and outright lies we’ve been fed, not only scientifically and medically, but politically, in regards to the election, I’m finding it increasing difficult to believe that a new, mutated strain of the virus has been discovered, just as the vaccine is being widely distributed.” read more

New Samsung Smartphone Sensor – 50-100Mega Pixel Photos and More

A new Isocell GN2 camera sensor from Samsung takes some big steps forward in autofocus and imaging technology
A new Isocell GN2 camera sensor from Samsung takes some big steps forward in autofocus and imaging technology
Samsung

Smartphones have revolutionized photography, making it vastly easier than ever before to capture and share great images. And on the other side of the coin, camera advances are probably responsible for a lot of smartphone sales these days; phones have been more than good enough in most areas for many years now, and a terrific new camera provides a compelling reason to upgrade where a processing boost or RAM upgrade might not move the needle.

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Weapon Wednesday – Flying Tanks? Epic Fail!

antonov a 40, t 60, ussr, stupid idea
Wikimedia Commons
  • Several countries have tried to make flying tanks, which can self-deploy over long distances.
  • The appeal is obvious: A flying tank would eliminate the need for a large cargo transport to carry it.
  • While the flying tank concept is theoretically possible, it requires too many design compromises to make an effective tank.

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Masking of Children is Unnecessary and Just Plain Wrong

by: Brent Smith

I agree, as do I usually, with Daniel Horowitz, that masking-up of our children is child abuse. But I think it’s worse than that.

Any student of history knows that if one (or group of ones) wants to change the behavior of its people, it’s a lot easier to get to them early, when they are young, impressionable and know nothing of history.

If you train children to think and act a certain way, they will likely take those lessons through to adulthood. If you train them to be fearful children, the majority will likely become fearful adults. The same goes for compliance. It’s human nature and has been repeated throughout history.

And now history is repeating itself once again. read more

Cold doesn’t bother You – You’re a Genetic Mutant

One in five people are thought to carry a mutation that is linked to better tolerance to the cold
One in five people are thought to carry a mutation that is linked to better tolerance to the cold

New research has found one in five people have a specific genetic mutation that confers greater resilience to cold temperatures. The experimental study shows how people with a deficiency in generating a certain skeletal muscle protein shiver less and hold a higher core temperature in cold environments. read more

Targeted Ultrasound can Open the Blood Brain Barrier

Rashi Mehta led a research team at West Virginia University investigating targeted ultrasound as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's
Rashi Mehta led a research team at West Virginia University investigating targeted ultrasound as a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s
WVU Photo/Caylie Silveira

Among the many moving parts that scientists suspect may play a role in Alzheimer’s disease is one known as the glymphatic system, which is thought to flush waste chemicals from the brain. A new study has demonstrated how this recently discovered system might be kicked into gear via ultrasound, with the technique proving effective in stimulating its activity in patients as part of early human trials. read more

New Deep Learning Melanoma Screening

A new deep learning algorithm can spot features of odd skin lesions and detect melanoma with high accuracy
A new deep learning algorithm can spot features of odd skin lesions and detect melanoma with high accuracy
Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Artificial intelligence is starting to combine with smartphone technology in ways that could have profound impacts on the way we monitor health, from tracking blood volume changes in diabetics to detecting concussions by filming the eyes. Using the technology to spot melanoma in its early stages is another exciting possibility, and a new deep-learning system developed by Harvard and MIT scientists promises a new level of sophistication, by using a method commonly used by dermatologists known as the “ugly duckling” criteria.

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