Life is Good for Those Who Work In D.C.

from CNS News:

The three richest counties in the United States with populations of 65,000 or more, when measured by their 2016 median household incomes, were all suburbs of Washington, D.C., according to data released today by the Census Bureau.

Eight of the 20 wealthiest counties with populations of 65,000 or more were also suburbs of Washington, D.C.–as were 10 of the top 25.
Loudoun County, Va., with a median household income of $134,464, was nation’s wealthiest county, according to the Census Bureau.

read more

Kim Jong-un and the D.C. Swamp may Suffer from the Same Affliction

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Scroll Down for Audio Version

I was reading an article posted at Conservative Review. It was entitled, “A little Hayek could go a long way in the bathroom debate.” It was regarding the Dysphoria of transgenderism sweeping the nation and how government thinks it can just mandate policies that contradict human nature.

Within the piece, the author, Nate Madden, writes that, “As the whole [transgender] debate drags on, it is becoming clearer and clearer that the trans-bathroom debate is a ripe one for Hayek’s theory of local knowledge. Long story short, Hayek contends in his essay ‘The Use of Knowledge in Society,’ nobody on earth possesses all the knowledge necessary to centrally plan a society or an economy.”

“The knowledge of the circumstances of which we must make use never exists in concentrated or integrated form,” explains Hayek, “but solely as the dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge which all the separate individuals possess.”

In other words, as Madden explains – the further the decision makers are from the things it has chosen to decide on, the worse the decisions get.

This got me to thinking about centralized planning, or centralized authority as a whole – that it is not only being far afield from any given situation, but also, and possibly more importantly, being shielded from the individuals and communities their decisions effect. read more

Podcast – Breaking News – Obama Staying in Washington

Yeah – some breaking news. We all knew he was going nowhere after he leaves office. He’s actually moving only about a mile down to street. A virtual stone’s throw from the White House. Gee – I wonder why he would choose to remain so close? It couldn’t be in an effort to protect his leftist legacy – which is more important than the office of President. It also couldn’t have anything to do with disrupting the new Trump administration, could it? I guess we’ll have to just wait and see. read more

With All the Restrictions – How was a DNC Staffer Gunned Down in D.C.

By: the Common Constitutionalist

Bloomingdale is a relatively anonymous neighborhood in Washington D.C. It is less than 2 two miles northwest of the capital. Few have ever heard of Bloomingdale – although if you are a “House of Cards” fan, the opening credits of the show feature shots of the D.C. neighborhood.

While it has undergone major rejuvenation, with more government staffers taking up residence, the neighborhood is still predominantly black – 59% according to the 2010 census.

One such D.C. staffer who resided in Bloomingdale was 27 year old Seth Conrad Rich. According to The Political Insider he worked as a “voter expansion data director” at the Democrat National Committee (DNC). Apparently he “worked on computer database to help voters identify and map their individual polling locations.”

Normally I would delve a little more deeply into what a “voter expansion data director” does, because if the DNC was his employer, you could bet what “voter expansion” might entail. But you may have noticed I used a lot of passed-tense words describing Mr. Rich.

This is because Seth is no longer with us. He was killed over the weekend in his own neighborhood of Bloomingdale. read more

To D.C. Homeless – Let Them Eat Brioche

by: the Common Constitutionalist:

Obama and the left love to travel the country making soap-box speeches bemoaning income inequality, yet right under their collective noses is a dichotomy of two vastly different economies in the District of Columbia. One is populated by “the connected”,  thriving in well-paying information and government jobs. The other is for people scrambling for even low-paying work.

rue Color ImageWe should be disgusted with that. Every high paying job in the DC area is attributed directly to government payroll or to servicing our bloated overseers. We all know this, and so do they in the “public sector,” but I’m sure they’ve convinced themselves, or been convinced, that their work is so essential, that they are the best and brightest, and therefore should be paid like kings.

According to the analysis by the DC Fiscal Policy Institute, “the top 5 percent of households in the District averaged $473,000 a year…,” and that was 3 years ago. Gee – I wonder if it’s even more now?

In 2012, the Washington Post reported that the “District has one of the highest levels of income inequality among the nation’s cities, with the top fifth earning on average 29 times the income of the bottom fifth.

The city’s top fifth of all households pulled in $259,000 on average. In contrast, the bottom fifth had an average income of $9,100. read more

Unequal Justice under the Law

by: the Common Constitutionalist

We all remember the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting in 2012. It’s hard to believe it has been over two years. We also recall the shooter, with his Bushmaster 223 rifle and its high capacity magazine – how the gun control wackos came out of the woodwork to call for a national ban on “scary” looking guns and high-capacity magazines. As if that matters.

SheenWhether it’s an AK-47 with a 30 round magazine or a pink Ruger .380 side arm – if either is pointed at you, it’s scary.

Speaking of high-capacity magazines, we might remember the uproar over then Meet the Press host David Gregory’s interview with the NRA’s Wayne LaPierre. It’s the one where Gregory actually brought a scary looking 30 round “high-capacity” magazine onto the set in Washington D.C. to confront Mr. LaPierre.

It’s a wonder anyone on the set survived the incident – you know – because magazines kill people. I’m reminded of the scene in the comedy, Hot Shots-Part Deux, where Charlie Sheen (back when he was still funny), was mowing down the enemy with a belt fed machine gun, and with the enemy still advancing, runs out of ammo. He drops the weapon, bends down, picks up a handful of bullets and throws them at the soldiers, killing them all. Very funny, but quite ridiculous. Kind of like brandishing an empty magazine with no gun. read more

Throw Them All Out

Polls indicate that the public is so disgusted with Washington politicians of both parties that a surprisingly large proportion of the people would like to get rid of the whole lot of them.

It is certainly understandable that the voters would like to “throw the rascals out.” But there is no point in throwing the rascals out, if we are just going to get a new set of rascals to replace them.

In other words, we need to think about what there is about current political practices that repeatedly bring to power such a counterproductive set of people. Those we call “public servants” have in fact become public masters. And they act like it. read more

America Suffers, D.C. Parties

American incomes have tumbled over the last decade. But for many people in Washington, D.C., it’s been something of a party.

Getty Images

The income of the typical D.C. household rose 23.3% between 2000 and 2012 to an inflation-adjusted $66,583, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, its most comprehensive snapshot of America’s demographic, social and economic trends. During this period, median household incomes for the nation as a whole dropped 6.6% — from $55,030 to $51,371. The state of Mississippi, which had one of the biggest declines, dropped 15% to $37,095: Nearly one in three people there have an income that is near the poverty line. read more