The Hollywood Makeover of Hanoi Jane – Part Two

A few days ago I posted John Velisek’s article entitled, The Hollywood Makeover of Hanoi Jane – Part One.

He informed us of a new HBO special which will no doubt attempt to white-wash her radical leftism and anti-Vietnam war atrocities. Or, knowing HBO, they may revel in them.

But John, as a Vietnam vet, remembers full well the damage that Hanoi Jane wrought. In Part Two, John reminds us of just what Hanoi Jane said.

Guest post by John C. Velisek USN (Ret.)
for the Common Constitutionalist

Does Jane or any of these liberals at HBO remember her speaking ill of our soldiers on July 30, 1972:

“They believed in the Army, but when they were here, when they discovered that their officers were incompetent, usually drunk when they discovered that the Vietnamese people have a fight that they believed in, that the Vietnamese people were fighting for much the same reason that we fought the beginning of our country…” read more

The Hollywood Makeover of Hanoi Jane – Part One

Guest post by John C. Velisek USN (Ret.)
for the Common Constitutionalist

Oh Look. It’s Hanoi Jane with John Kerry!

The progressive socialist party, commonly known as the Democrats, is firmly in the “win at all costs” mode that will lead to even more demagoguery and possibly violence. With democrat politicians calling for the harassment of Republicans and Trump supporters, confrontations will become so prevalent as to be commonplace. This is what the leftists want, and they are demanding that all follow their agenda.

Brett Kavanaugh is just the first, and if they prevail in the midterms, the power they wield will damage the fabric of this country and its citizens.

The negative effects to the nation can be traced to leftists from the past that continue to plague us to this day.

One of these people is “Hanoi” Jane Fonda. A woman who would like us to think that she has “moved on” from the damage she has done to this country – a woman who called for the execution of American soldiers during Vietnam. Today, progressive socialists speak of caring for our active duty men and women and pretend to be so concerned about our veterans, that to this day suffer every day from the actions they were asked to perform in defense of our nation.

The “pretending to care” they show to the American people is a farce, and no one epitomizes that lie more than Hanoi Jane. read more

A Celebration of Soldiers

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Memorial Day, originally known as Decoration Day began after the Civil War. It is a time to reflect and remember those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Frankly they should be honored more than once a year. Decoration day was established on May 5, 1868. It was so named as a time to “decorate” soldiers graves with flowers.

“The Grand Army of the Republic”, an organization of Union Army veterans established it.

So this Memorial Day, go to a parade, attended a military Memorial ceremony, lay some flowers at the foot of a soldier’s grave and seek out and thank a veteran or active duty military man or woman for their service (although this should be a regular function of your day).

There have been many Memorial Day events but the most memorable in recent history was an event hosted by none other than President Richard Nixon. read more

The Human Toll of Terror

By: the Common Constitutionalist

Regarding all the terrorism around the world, and particularly in the Middle East, it’s getting increasingly easy to become frustrated to the point of saying, just carpet bomb the whole region and be done with them all. Maybe we haven’t come out and said it, but most of us have at least thought it, Operation_Linebacker_II_bomber_plane_B-52_Stratofortresseven in passing.

It would be an easy thing to do – like in 1972, when President Nixon green lighted Operation Linebacker II. The massive 11 day air attack on the Hanoi area of North Vietnam was prompted by North Vietnamese negotiators walking out of secret talks with National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger. Nixon issued an ultimatum to Hanoi to send its representatives back to the conference table within 72 hours “or else.”

Or else what? Or else he’d do what he said he would. A real “man of his word,” relative to the petulant child currently (sometimes) residing at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Just ask the Iranians about Obama’s word, or ultimatums.

Well, the North Vietnamese didn’t return, and bombing began just days later. Over just an 11 day period, B-52s and fighter bombers flew 1700 sorties and dropped over 20,000 tons of bombs. This was carpet bombing, using dumb bombs, purposely utilized to inflict damage, pain and suffering. It had the desired effect.

This is not a critique, for or against the Vietnam War. It is just to demonstrate that with the will, it can be done. read more

The Myth of the Vietnam War and the Tet Offensive

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Okay, this is not very Christmassy, but I was speaking with my son the other day. He was telling me of the classes he would be taking next semester. When he told me his American history class would be on the war in Vietnam, I physically cringed.

I said that we would have to arm him with the truth prior to the commencement of the class, for although I don’t know for certain, I suspect that conflict would not get a fair shake in a public high school classroom. Odds are I’m right.

So, when the lefties speak of Vietnam, other than that our soldiers were all drugged up baby killers, what do they always point to? That’s right – The Tet Offensive – the surprise attack on January 31, 1968 that turned the tide to favor North Vietnam, who eventually won the war.

This is likely what my son will be taught, so I thought it necessary to set him straight, and may be others who aren’t familiar.

The ‘68 Tet Offensive is named for the Vietnamese new year of Tet. It is the date of the first new moon of the year, and for this, after the battle of Khe Sanh, a cease-fire was agreed to on January 30, 1968. It was short-lived. read more

Doggie Doo Transmitter

It may look like an average piece of dog feces – but in fact, this is a complex military transmitter used throughout the Vietnam War.

Known as the ‘T-1151 Dog Doo Transmitter’, it was used as a homing beacon during the Vietnam War.

It emitted a warning when movements occured, allowing US Military bosses to monitor shipments, or find a soldier in need of rescue.

The transmitter is a homing beacon that sends out a signal to those monitoring an indicator - or someone in need of rescue.
The transmitter is a homing beacon that sends out a signal to those monitoring an indicator – or someone in need of rescue.

 

Inside is a transmitter than can be used as a homing beacon, or transmit morse code messages
Inside is a transmitter than can be used as a homing beacon, or transmit morse code messages read more

War is Hell

LIFE magazine war photographer, Larry  Burrows, covered the fighting on the front lines during the Vietnam War and is  now being remembered for his extraordinary work as the 41 year anniversary of  his death approaches.

Mr Burrows captured the compelling images of  Operation Prairie, the U.S. offensive against the North Vietnamese near the  Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), that lasted from August 3 to October 27, 1966.

His photographs of the bloody aftermath of  the attack, juxtaposed against the lush and picturesque scenery of the Southeast  Asian nation, are being revisited on LIFE.comas the  London-born photojournalist is remembered.

Scroll down  for video.

U.S. Marines
 U.S. Marines carry the injured during a  firefight near the southern edge of the DMZ, Vietnam, October 1966
American Marines
 An American Marine during Operation  Prairie

 

During Operation Prairie
American soldier
 Marines carry an injured soldier back to the  medics for treatment following an assault on Hill 484, Vietnam, October 1966  (top). An American soldier (bottom) with a bandaged head wound looking dazed  after participating in Operation Prairie just south of the DMZ

An estimated 1,329 Americans were killed  during the operation. More than 58,000 Americans lost their lives in the  conflict in Indochina that ended in 1975.

One of the most famous images in the  collection by Burrows is the shot ‘Reaching Out,’ the moment when  wounded  Gunnery Sgt. Jeremiah Purdie, photographed with a blood-stained  bandage tied  around his head, is drawn to his fellow soldier, who lays  wounded on the  ground.

Though some of the pictures by the  renowned  war photographer did appear in the magazine in the 1970s, some  never made it to  publication and are being seen for the first time  in theLIFE.comgallery.

The war correspondent has been praised for  his indefatigable commitment to chronicle the conflict through pictures that  communicated the horror of the fighting and honored the lives lost in the  conflict in a way words just never could fully transmit.

Wounded Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jeremiah Purdie
Wounded Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jeremiah  Purdie (center, with bandaged head) reaches toward a stricken comrade after a  fierce firefight
American Marine gets bandaged during Operation Prairie
 A dazed, wounded American Marine gets bandaged  during Operation Prairie
Four Marines
Four Marines recover the body of Marine fire  team leader Leland Hammond as their company comes under fire near Hill 484. (At  right is the French-born photojournalist Catherine Leroy)

 

 

 

Burrows himself suffered a tragic end as he  worked on the front lines, he was killed on February 10, 1971 over Laos  when  his helicopter was shot down. He was 44-years-old.

Fellow photographers Henri Huet, 43,  of the  Associated Press, Kent Potter, 23, of United Press International  and Keisaburo  Shimamoto, 34, of Newsweek were also killed in the crash.

Ralph Graves, then LIFE magazine’s  managing  editor, remembered the Englishman as ‘the single bravest and most  dedicated war  photographer I know of,’ in a moving tribute he wrote following Burrows’ death.

‘He spent nine years covering the  Vietnam  War under conditions of incredible danger, not just at odd times but over and  over again.’

‘The war was his story, and he would  see it  through. His dream was to stay until he could photograph a  Vietnam at peace,’  Mr Graves added in the 1971 issue dedicated to the  fallen  correspondent.

 

U.S. Marine Phillip Wilson
 U.S. Marine Phillip Wilson as he fords a  waist-deep river with a rocket launcher over his shoulder during fighting near  the DMZ. Five days after this photograph was taken, he was killed in  combat

 

American Marines
American Marines tending to a wounded soldier  during a firefight south of the DMZ

 

Though the lost photographers were  mourned,  their remains were not discovered until 37 years later thanks to the tireless  effort spearheaded by AP writer Richard Pyle.

The remains of Mr Burrows, Mr Buet, Mr  Potter and Mr Shimamoto now sit in a stainless-steel box beneath the  floor of  the Newseum in Washington, D.C., part of a memorial gallery  honoring  journalists killed in the line of duty.

A total of 2,156 individuals, dating back as  far as 1837, are included in the museum’s memorial.

War correspondentWar correspondent: Terry Fincher of the Express (left)  and Larry Burrows (right) covering the war in Vietnam in April 1968

 

Larry Burrows Vietnam War
Larry Burrows Vietnam War Photographs
In memory: The remains of Larry Burrows and the three  other war photographers killed in the helicopter crash over Laos in 1971 were  finally discovered some 37 years later. They now reside at a memorial (bottom) to  fallen journalists at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

Attribution: Leslie Larson, Mail Online

Afghanistan; What’s the Point?

By: The Common Constitutionalist

The attack on Afghanistan began Oct. 7, 2001 dubbed operation ‘Enduring Freedom’. It was in response to the 9/11 attacks. The stated goal was the dismantling of the al-Qaeda terrorist organization and ending its use of Afghanistan as a base.

The United States also said that it would remove the Taliban regime from power and attempt to create a viable democratic state.

The George W. Bush administration stated that, as policy, it would not distinguish between terrorist organizations and nations or governments that harbored them. Of course, it did, Saudi Arabia being a prime example.

On June 22, 2011, President Obama announced that the end of 2011 would withdraw 10,000 U.S. troops. An additional 23,000 troops will leave the country by the summer of 2012. After the withdrawal of 10,000 U.S. troops, 80,000 are left participating in the war. The War in Afghanistan is the United States’ second longest running military conflict, only the Vietnam War lasted longer.

 Almost 2,000 deaths, over 15,000 wounded. For what? What is our vital interest? I have been searching for days to find what our mission actually is over there. I cannot.

What a monumental waste of manpower, money and time. Our brave forces volunteer for military service, only to be sent over to that hellhole to be shot at & blown up & for what? They don’t know what the mission is. They don’t know what they’re fighting for. They are just told to clear those buildings, clear that road, etc. That’s not a mission. That’s a task and a very dangerous one at that. Especially when more often than not they can’t even shoot back without special permission. The enemy can shoot at us, exhaust his supply of ammunition, put the weapon & simply walk away. We are not allowed to fire on him as he calmly strolls away.

Just imagine if General Patton were told the enemy were hold up in a Mosque. There would be no more Mosque. But not in today’s enlightened military.

We, in this country cannot fight a war to win any longer. We don’t have the stomach for it. We’re too civilized, I guess.

Bring the troops home now; every last one of them, and never go to war again until such time as we can develop the courage & determination to actually win.

What the heck happened to us? Everyone knows the old saying “War is Hell”. I agree. War is hell and no one hates war more than the military. But it is also sometimes necessary. It should however be quite uncommon. We shouldn’t be inserting ourselves into every conflict around the globe.

Our leaders have somehow morphed vital or national interests into Meals on Wheels, saving the whole world, or democracy building.

Any reasonable person would understand that we can’t save the whole world and democracy building is a fool’s errand in most countries.

The United States is a good, just and very charitable country. I understand the want of many to right the wrongs in the world. I certainly don’t have a quarrel with our military acting as first responders after a natural disaster somewhere on this planet, but beyond that we must first consider our own interests.

Is the war in Afghanistan being fought for our interests or the interests of others?

Consider the wars past that America has become involved. The ones we have won and those we’ve lost.

World War II was the last real war that America has won, the Cold War notwithstanding. Of course, Vietnam was the last that we lost.

In World War II we lost many battles but yet won the war. We won the war due to overwhelming force and an understanding of what had to be done regardless of the cost. We bombed cities such as Berlin inflicting horrible civilian casualties. Something we would never consider today. These attacks were not by accident. These were purposeful. They were designed to bring the enemy to their knees. The same was proven of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. All these horrific attacks were designed to bring the war to a swifter end and of course they did.

World War II was primarily controlled by the military and less by politicians. Vietnam was fought more by politicians than the military. Unlike World War II, in Vietnam, America won every battle yet still lost the war. Every time our military got close to actually winning the politicians would inject themselves into the situation and order the military to back off and cease hostilities. We could have and would have won the Vietnam War, yet we lost. How is this possible? Easy. One cannot fight a war from Washington DC. As in domestic politics the further one is removed from the front lines the more screwed up things get, which brings us right back to Afghanistan.

So I ask again, what is our mission over there? When, if ever, can we declare victory? What would victory even look like? No one can tell me these answers because there are no answers. This is not a war. It’s a never-ending conflict that can only end with us running away with our tails between our legs again.

If it were up to me, I would scorch the poppy fields, spray chemicals on the fields so that they could not be used again and leave. I would then cut all ties and end all financial assistance to any country on the terror watchlist or those with a despotic leader. Finally I would issue a proclamation, worldwide, stating that if attacked, we will find the country that harbored the attackers and bomb said country into oblivion and then leave.  No rebuilding, no assistance, no nothing. If a country chooses to harbor terrorists, they will know ahead of time the price they will pay for that choice.