Revolutionary New Fuel Cell

Scientists have developed a new technique to examine the inner membrane of a fuel cell, in a breakthrough that could be a ‘game changer’ for cleaner energy.

The lifetime of a fuel cell relies on a process called oxidation, or the breakdown of its central electrolyte membrane – and, researchers have now found a way to observe the formation of the chemicals that give rise to this process.

As oxidation can cause holes to form in the membrane and eventually cause the cell to short circuit, the new work could now help to develop ways to prevent this damage, and extend the life of the fuel cell.

The researchers at Washington University in St Louis used an approach known as fluorescence spectroscopy to view the process as it occurs inside the fuel cell. The method uses fluorescent dye as a marker to reveal the rate at which the damaging chemicals are generated

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Fast Food May Save Your Life

The fat found in fast food can help protect against the deadliest form of skin cancer, a study claims.

Experts found that palmitic acid, which is in products such as burgers and cookies, fuels a protein involved in the pigmentation process to help protect against harmful skin cancer mutations.

While fast food can have harmful effects on the heart and brain, it could prevent melanoma, a deadly skin cancer.

Rates of people being diagnosed with melanoma have increased the past 30 years in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates close to 10,000 people will die from the cancer this year.

Experts said this breakthrough in research could lead to a drug for those who are red hair, fair skinned or have consistently tanned, all of whom are more at risk to get skin cancer.

A fat found in fast food can help prevent someone from getting melanoma, a new study showed. Palmitic acid is found in a lot of fast food such as burgers, fries and cookies. This acid, or fatty lipid, fought against mutations that cause skin cancer in mice

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Moon May Have Sustainable Water

When you think of the moon you might picture a dry, desolate, rocky place, but recent evidence has been putting this idea to the test.

A new study shows the surface of the moon has more water than we thought, suggesting the interior of our natural satellite could hold a deep reservoir of water.

This new finding bolsters the idea that the lunar mantle is surprisingly water-rich, which could make colonising it for future space exploration much easier.

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Pictured is a map of water molecules on the moon in the morning and midday, crafted by reading how certain wavelengths of light are reflected or absorbed at its surface. The warmer colors show where there is more water on the lunar surface (credit: TU Dortmund) read more

WND Exclusive – In Defense of History’s ‘Imperialistic’ Explorers

We on the right – I mean the real right – have been insisting that the tearing down of statues and monuments from the Civil War era would not end there. The leftist radicals would inevitably turn their wrath beyond Civil War white racists and direct their hatred to any white American slave owner. As we’ve seen and heard, this naturally extends to whites of the Revolutionary era, who are simultaneously celebrated heroes and damnable slave owners.

And then we wondered – what’s next after that? Could there possibly be a next? Well, wonder no more.

Now, normally, when wacky ideas emanate from the left, they originate in Europe, leapfrog to California and then make their way across the U.S. to negatively affect the rest of us. read more

This Little Piggy Grew an Organ

Growing human transplant organs in pigs has become a more realistic prospect after scientists used advanced gene editing to remove threatening viruses from the animals’ DNA.

Porcine endogenous retroviruses are permanently embedded in the pig genome but research has shown they can infect human cells, posing a potential hazard.

The existence of the virus has been a major stumbling block preventing the development of genetically engineered pigs to provide kidneys and other organs for transplant into human patients.

That hurdle may now have been cleared away, according to new research reported in the journal Science.

Researchers at Harvard University and a private company used the precision gene editing tool Crispr-Cas9 combined with gene repair technology to deactivate 100 percent of the virus in a line of pig cells.

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Mapping Junk DNA Could Cure Disease

Yellowstone Super-Caldera Has Deformed

As small earthquakes continue to rumble around the Yellowstone supervolcano in Wyoming, scientists have revealed new evidence of the changes going on beneath the ground.

A new map from the US Geological Survey shows how the ground around the Yellowstone caldera has deformed over the span of two years, as the quakes release uplift-causing pressure, allowing the ground to sink back down.

This activity is typically linked to changes in magma and gases deep below the surface – but for now, the experts say there’s no cause for worry.

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In the map above, a bulls-eye shaped section of uplift can be seen at the Norris Geyser Basin, where the ground has risen roughly 3 inches. And, an elliptical subsidence can be seen in the Yellowstone caldera, with the ground dropping about 1.2 inches

EARTHQUAKE SWARM 

The University of Utah’s Seismograph Stations (UUSS) have been monitoring the activity since it began June 12.

A total of 1,562 quakes have been recorded so far at Yellowstone since the swarm began.

Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise about 50 per cent of the total activity in the Yellowstone region.

Although the latest swarm is the largest since 2012, it is fewer than weekly counts during similar events in 2002, 2004, 2008 and 2010. 

Tremors were recorded from ground level to 9mi (14.5km) below sea level.

Seismic activity could be a sign of an impending eruption of the supervolcano, although this is impossible to predict exactly

The map, created by USGS geophysicist Chuck Wicks uses data from June 2015 and July 2017 to show how the region around Yellowstone has changed.

In the map, the colourful rings show the changes in the ground’s elevation as seen by a radar satellite, according to USGS.

A bulls-eye shaped section of uplift can be seen at the Norris Geyser Basin, where the ground has risen roughly 3 inches.

And, an elliptical subsidence can be seen in the Yellowstone caldera, with the ground dropping about 1.2 inches.

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The Rise of Ransomware

Targets of ransomware attacks shelled out a combined $25 million in ransoms over the last two years alone.

Researchers at Google, Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering came to the astounding total by following the Bitcoin transactions the victims paid their hackers through the blockchain, then comparing them against known samples to create a comprehensive overview of the ransomware ecosystem.

The study tracked 34 separate families hit by ransomware attacks and revealed that just a few strains of malicious software were responsible for the majority of the attacks and profits.  read more

The Terror Britain Let In

from Katie Hopkins:

At this difficult time, Britain is faced with some hard questions the people charged with protecting us are going to have to answer sooner or later.

The Manchester suicide bomber Salman Abedi was known to the authorities.

He is believed to have travelled to the Middle East and become radicalised before returning to the UK to cause carnage at a gig in the city where he was born just days later.

As his father and brother were arrested in Libya, security force sources there said the father had links to Al Qaeda and another source claimed the brother ‘was aware of all the details’ of attack plans.

Yet he was allowed to walk back to the UK unchallenged.

Katie Hopkins asks: Who is going to protect our kids from the terror the politicians let in?
Katie Hopkins asks: Who is going to protect our kids from the terror the politicians let in?

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Mind Reading Device

A device that reads people’s minds through their brainwaves has been created by scientists.

It could lead to an ‘easily-operated’ machine that links up to smartphones in the next five years, the researchers said.

The breakthrough could one-day help handicapped people who struggle to speak to communicate again, such as those who have suffered a stroke.

It could be used as a ‘telepathic typewriter’ that automatically notes down what we are thinking.

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A device that reads people's minds through their brainwaves has been created by scientists. It could lead to an 'easily-operated' machine that links up to smartphones in the next five years. This image shows the collection of 'EEG' brainwave data by the researchers during their study
A device that reads people’s minds through their brainwaves has been created by scientists. It could lead to an ‘easily-operated’ machine that links up to smartphones in the next five years. This image shows the collection of ‘EEG’ brainwave data by the researchers during their study

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