Foldable Scooter

 ‘Suitcase Scooter’ with a top speed of 28mph that can you can fold in half

 

For anyone who has ever struggled to find a  parking space, it could be the ultimate commuter transport – a groundbreaking  electric scooter that conveniently folds up.

The practical scooter folds in the middle,  allowing the user to easily take it on a train or in the back of a car before  riding it at a respectable 28 mph.

The innovative scooter has a comfortable  traditional leather seat – making sure the rider is comfy as they travel through  the city.

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The Moveo scooter can reach 28 mph, and is propelled by in-wheel motors in both wheels. Instead of parking, owners can simply fold it in half and take it into the office
The Moveo scooter can reach 28 mph, and is propelled by  in-wheel motors in both wheels. Instead of parking, owners can simply fold it in  half and take it into the office

 

The end of parking: The practical scooter folds in the middle, allowing the user to easily take it on a train or in the back of a car - or just into the office
The practical scooter folds in the  middle, allowing the user to easily take it on a train or in the back of a car –  or just into the office

It weighs 25 kilograms (55 lbs) and has a battery life of 22 miles – which takes just one hour to fully charge.

The scooter, known as Moveo, is propelled by  in-wheel motors in both wheels and it takes just seconds to fold.

When users reach their destination, instead of looking for a parking space, they can simply fold the scooter’s carbon-composite body in two.

Then the golden bike can be pulled along by an integrated handle, before being taken inside like a suitcase.

And riders are protected against coming into contract with the dirty parts of the bike as it is completely closed when folded.

The company that designed the Moveo hopes it  will be on sale at the start of next year.

It weighs 25 kilograms and has a battery life of 22 miles - which takes just one hour to fully charge
It weighs 25 kilograms and has a battery life of 22  miles – which takes just one hour to fully charge

 

The scooter, known as Moveo, is propelled by in-wheel motors in both wheels and it takes just seconds to fold
The scooter, known as Moveo, is propelled by in-wheel  motors in both wheels and it takes just seconds to fold

Tamas Slezak, CEO of the Antro Group, who developed the scooter, believes that their product is definitely something for  the future.

He said: ‘The Moveo is ultra light-weight and  is the best additional vehicle to public transport.

‘You can travel eco-friendly in the easiest and quickest way, and our innovative product will suit commuters in big cities  around the world.’

The Moveo will cost £2,000 ($3055) and Mr Slezak added that sales will initially take place on the internet.

He added: ‘It’s almost ready for production  and we are looking for investors, and with their help, we will be able to finalize the development.

‘Most probably we will begin with medium scale production and after about a year ramp up for the bigger scale production.’

Busy commuters will soon dash to the office without worrying about parking - by riding a groundbreaking electric scooter that conveniently folds up.
Busy commuters will soon dash to the office without  worrying about parking – by riding a groundbreaking electric scooter that  conveniently folds up.

 

When folded up, the 25kg scooter can be dragged like a piece of luggage
When folded up, the 25kg scooter can be dragged like a  piece of luggage

Attribution: Mark Prigg, Mail Online

Anyone Interested in the VMT?

by: Tim Brown & the Common Constitutionalist

It never ceases to amaze me how government can come up with new ways to milk people of their money, but find it impossible to cut their spending.

 Such is a new method that states are trying to come up with by tracking the mileage on your car and taxing it appropriately.

The new technology is already being explored by Minnesota and Oregon. The GPS-like box would be mounted inside a person’s vehicle and they can purchase “miles” ahead of time.

 “As the (national vehicle) fleet becomes more fuel efficient … we’re going to lose a lot of revenue from the gas tax. If it’s not replaced, we’re going to see our transportation infrastructure deteriorate,” says Joshua Schank, president of the Eno Center for Transportation in Washington, D.C.

He expects to see a state vehicle miles-traveled (VMT) tax within the next 5 to 10 years.

“We’re seeing a lot of interest in VMT as one of the potential solutions to transportation funding gaps that states are dealing with,” says Jaime Rall, senior policy specialist at the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Many say the greatest obstacle to a miles-traveled tax has been privacy concerns. When Oregon ran a pilot program six years ago, motorists’ major objection was to in-vehicle boxes used to track miles driven, said James Whitty of the Oregon Department of Transportation. “They didn’t like the government boxes. They didn’t like the GPS mandate,” he says.

Of those 2 words, GPS and mandate, my guess is they objected more to ‘mandate’.

So let’s see if I have this right. In most states, we purchase a vehicle and pay a tax to either the city or town & the state. Then we must register it; another tax. Then we buy gas for it and pay tax on the gas. We then pay a toll to drive on the road; that’s a tax. Now they’re going to tax us on the miles we drive due to diminished revenue because they have forced us into more economical cars with escalated fuel costs and bogus CAFE standards?

 Next, some state or federal bureaucrat will propose a new tax (actually more of a penalty) for non-mass transit users. An additional fee when you register your vehicle. By purchasing a car, it is assumed you will not be using mass transit. The intent of said bureaucrat is to nudge people toward the use of trains and buses.

 If the program has any success, the government will soon discover the revenue shortfall was caused by it’s own action & must then invent another tax or fee to subsidize that shortfall.

 This is what governments do. They constantly cause more problems than they ever solve.

This SUV is not for Everyone

You might not think that there would be much overlap between Lamborghini lovers and SUV drivers.

After all, the flashy sports cars are usually driven by stars and musicians, while rugged off-road vehicles are more the preserve of farmers and outdoorsmen – or, in recent years, suburban soccer moms.

But the two worlds are about to collide, as the luxury Italian firm launches its own four-by-four, for the lumberjack who wants to look smart as he traverses the forest.

The Lamborghini Urus was unveiled at the Beijing Auto Show this week, and it could be coming to a road – or dirt track – near you before too long. Although Lamborghini has not yet revealed the price,  it is expected to hit the market in 2015.

It arguably looks more like a sports car than like the average SUV, with its aerodynamic shape, sleek design and glossy finish. This “crossover” has huge 24-inch wheels and a 600 horsepower engine. Like most of Lamborghini’s cars, the Urus has full-time all-wheel-drive with a focus on on-road performance.

At just 5ft 6in high, the car is also significantly shorter than most other four-wheel drives, making it more attractive to the city-dwellers who provide Lamborghini’s usual customer base.

And its more hi-tech features are a world away from the rural origins of the the SUV, as it is equipped with all sorts of clever gadgetry.

Instead of wing mirrors, it has cameras feeding video to screens positioned next to the driver.

The Urus – named after an extinct ancestor of the cow – is packed with carbon fibre, which is exceptionally strong relative to its weight.

And the car even changes its own shape, with a front spoiler which adjusts its position depending on whether the driver is off-road or speeding down the freeway.

Surprisingly, this is not the first time Lamborghini has tried to launch an SUV.

From 1985 to 1992 they made the LM002, a less fashionable model which did not find success as just 300 were ever sold.

The company is determined that the Urus will be different, and is planning to turn out as many as 3,000 per year.

That would make the SUV Lamborghini’s most popular model – but it remains to be seen whether the firm is ready to shift from boy racers to rednecks.

 Attribution: INAutoNews, Mail Online

3D-Nanoprinting

Making complex 3D structures would normally take hours or even days to perfect.
But researchers from the Vienna University of Technology have sped that up considerably – and produced grain-of-sand sized objects such as bridges, cathedrals and Formula 1 cars.

It is thought that the world record for producing the nano-objects in the quickest time has been smashed.

The attention to detail is exquisite – and the craftsmanship is even more impressive when you appreciate the scale of the endeavour.

In the design of London’s Tower Bridge, for example, you can make out details in the roof-work of the tower, as well as the railings on the actual bridge.

The little Formula 1 car is just 0.028cm (0.011 in.) across – or to put it another way, less than a third of a millimeter.

So this tiny little motor could easily fit into the space of the period at the end of this sentence.

If that isn’t impressive enough, the Vienna Institute of Technology created the 100-layer nano-structure in just four minutes – a huge increase on previous technology.

The precision model uses a technique called two-photon lithography, which uses highly-focused light beams to manipulate, then harden resin molecules in exactly the right position.

The ‘two-photon’ part of the name refers to how the resin only hardens when two photon molecules hit it at the same time.

3D printing its still in its infancy, although commercial and even domestic printers are now hitting the market.

The technology opens up the exciting world of nano-technology to both industry and the public, with many applications in science and medicine.

For instance, in the future, you may be able to print out small items for your life – almost anything like cups or plates.

The medical applications are also significant. The technology has been trialled in dental work and bone reconstruction, with one lady having her jaw reconstructed via 3D printing following a bone infection.

But the standard replication method usually requires a model to be built up layer-by-layer, whereas the two-photon method can operate across the model at once.

Attribution: Mail Online

Joke of the Day

A cocky State Highway inspector stopped at a farm and talked with an old farmer. He told the farmer, “I need to inspect your farm for a possible new road.”

The old farmer said, “OK, but don’t go in that field.” The arrogant Highway employee said, “I have the authority of the State Government to go where I want. See this card? I am allowed to go wherever I wish.”

So the old farmer went about his farm chores.

Later, he heard loud screams and saw the State Highway employee running for the fence and close behind was the farmer’s prize bull. The bull was madder than a nest full of hornets and the was gaining on the employee at every step!!

The Inspector, running at break-neck speed, shouted to the farmer, “Help, what do I do?”.
The old farmer shouted back, “Show him your card!!”

Ever Feel You Were Being Watched?

In the little town of Bluffdale, Utah, between the Wasatch Range and the Oquirrh Mountains, the National Security Agency (NSA) is building what will be the nation’s largest spy center.

 Dubbed the Utah Data Center, the project is already employing thousands of hardhat workers in its construction and will soon have some 10,000 construction workers building a data center that will be more than five times the size of the nation’s capitol.

“We’ve been asked not to talk about the project,” Rob Moore told a local reporter. Mr. Moore is president of Big-D Construction, one of the three major contractors working on the project. Plans for the center include a $10 million antiterrorism protection program, a fence designed to stop a 15,000-pound vehicle traveling 50 miles per hour, closed-circuit cameras, a biometric identification system, a vehicle inspection facility, and a visitor-control center.

Why all the fuss? Why all the security?

Well, the lead story in Wired magazine for April exposed the Stellar Wind program for its intended purpose: to spy on every jot and scribble of any American citizen’s life all the way down to his “pocket litter:” parking-lot stubs, receipts from McDonalds, tickets from his haircut at Cost Cutters, as well as all the way up to the content of his every e-mail, every Google search, every telephone or cell phone conversation.

Stellar Wind is the code name for an effort approved by President George W. Bush following the September 11, 2001 attacks, to mine a large database of communications of American citizens but which was allegedly terminated when Congress pushed back against it.

However, the National Security Agency, awash with funds provided by Congress, is nearly finished constructing the Utah Data Center as the collection point for data provided from around the country and around the world. Its purpose: “to intercept, decipher, analyze and store vast swaths of the world’s communications … [including] all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls and Google searches.”

In other words, according to James Bamford, author of The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America, when the $2 billion facility (consisting of four 25,000 square-foot buildings full of computer servers and their air conditioning units plus a 900,000 square-foot building to house its technical and administration people) is completed in September, 2013, virtually everything one communicates through any traceable medium, or any record of one’s existence in the electronic medium, which these days is everything, will … become the property of the US government to deal with as its sees fit.

William Binney, a former NSA crypto-mathematician who quit NSA after he realized it was openly and deliberately ignoring privacy limitations built into the Constitution, said in an interview with Bamford, holding his thumb and forefinger close together: “We are this far from a turnkey totalitarian state.”

Binney headed up a team that built the infrastructure to spy on everyone all the time and, at the time, recommended that NSA install its “tapping gear” only at the nation’s “landing sites” — physical locations where fiber optic cables come ashore — to limit its eavesdropping to international communications only and preserving Americans’ right to privacy.

But NSA ignored Binney’s recommendation and instead decided to build its spy center in Utah, connecting it with satellites and listening posts in Colorado, Georgia, Texas, Hawaii, and elsewhere, with direct links to NSA headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland, NSA’s research facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and last but not least, the White House.

In addition NSA has two huge data-gathering facilities, each with three 105-foot satellite dishes, one at Catawissa, Pennsylvania, called Roaring Creek, the other at Arbuckle, California, called Salt Creek.

Says Binney, “They violated the Constitution setting it up. But they didn’t care. They were going to do it anyway, and they were going to crucify anyone who stood in their way. When they started violating the Constitution, I couldn’t stay.”

One of the challenges NSA faced was decrypting data, such as that encoded by PGP or the much more robust encryption software used by governments. The Advanced Encryption Standard is used to protect most commercial e-mail programs and web browsers and has, until very recently, been considered unbreakable.

To break a 128-bit encryption code, for example, the number of trial-and-error attempts — call “brute force” — requires an incomprehensibly large number of attempts before succeeding: 340 undecillion (10 to the 26th power). But current breakthroughs by NSA, using Cray super computers, now can break such codes in fractions of a second, exposing all information to the light of day and the peering eyes of NSA observers.

At the moment it appears that the two strongest barriers to intrusions on privacy, technological and constitutional, have been shredded. But courts are involved in a variety of challenges to the NSA’s efforts, and the project isn’t due to come online in full flower until a year from September. Such an operation, now out in the open, requires enormous funding.

Congress, given sufficient encouragement and electoral change of heart this November, could just shut it down by defunding it. It’s really up to informed Americans to see where their elected officials stand on privacy versus security and then take appropriate action in the voting booth.

Attribution: Patriot Update, The New American

Mitt hearts Oil

I don’t agree much with Mitt Romney, but he is right on the money regarding this topic.

rom: Conservative Byte

During an interview on “Fox News Sunday,” former Massachusetts governor and presidential candidate Mitt Romney said there is “no question” that President Obama is to blame for rising gas prices and called for the president to fire the “gas hike trio” of cabinet members.

“When [President Obama] ran for office, he said he wanted to see gasoline prices go up,” Romney said. “He said that energy prices would skyrocket under his views, and he selected three people to help him implement that program.

The secretary of energy, the secretary of interior and EPA administrator. And this gas hike trio has been doing the job over the last three-and-a-half years, and gas prices are up. The right course is they ought to be fired because the president has apparently suffered election-year conversion. He’s now decided that gasoline prices should come down.”

Romney went on to say that once Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson submit their letters of resignation, Obama should “start drilling for energy here,” and pursue development of oil, natural gas, and coal resources.

Joke du Jour

A Father says to his son: “I want you to marry a girl of my choice.”

His son immediately replies: “I will choose my own bride, father.”

The Father sighs: “But the girl is Bill Gates’ daughter.”

The son thinks about this only for a split second – then answers: “Well, in that case, yes! OK Dad.”

The Father then approaches Bill Gates and says: “I have a husband for your lovely daughter.”

Bill Gates quickly answers: “No chance! My daughter is too young to get married!”

The Father says: “But this young man is a vice-president of World Bank.”

Bill Gates thinks for a while then answers: “Ah well, in that case, yes, that’ll be OK with me.”

Finally the Father goes to see the president of World Bank.

The Father smiles and says: “I have a young man to recommend as a Vice-President.”

The President hurriedly answers: “Not interested, I already have more vice-presidents than I need.”

The Father continues smiling: “But this young man is Bill Gates’ son-in-law.”

A few seconds pass, then the World Bank President answers: “Ah that’s interesting, Hmmm. In that case, well yes, he may start tomorrow.”

Now that’s looking out for your kid!

Chu on This

Could this station be the one the Obama family fills up the old war wagon? I rather doubt it, but it is only about a mile from the White House.

That’s bad, but sadly it is not worst in the nation. Although I can’t find a photo, I have confirmed prices in Los Angeles. At some stations the prices start at $5.99 for regular, $6.09 for mid-grade and $6.19 for premium. Holy Crap!

So at what point will the economy just come to a screeching halt? If this keeps up, I’d say very soon.

Here’s an idea. Maybe we can petition Nancy Pelosi to allow us to use our food stamps to purchase gas?

If you have been paying attention you would realize this is exactly what this Administration desired. This is the Green Utopian model playing out. Strangle the oil, gas & coal industries & force people into their sunshine and lollipop alternative energies.

Why else would anyone hire Steven Chu to be the Energy Secretary? He’s a Global Warming advocate & champion of anything and everything “Green”.

Here’s just one example of Chu’s great ideas for saving us all from ourselves!

In 2008, Steven Chu was quite clear what he wanted for this country. As of February, 28, just 2 weeks ago, his view hadn’t changed.

But just Tuesday, at a Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing, Senator Mike Lee (R-Ut.) asked Secretary Chu: “So are you saying you no longer share the view that we need to figure out how to boost gasoline prices in America?” Chu responded: “I no longer share that view.”

Share that view with whom? It was his view. My guess is between his testimony in Feb. and now, he was taken to the woodshed and told he had better shut up about his and the administration’s true intentions.

I’m also sure that he was told that after the election, there will be no restraints and they can go full speed ahead with their plans to forcibly change our behavior.

If Obama wins a second term, the new slogan will be “Yes We Can, Walk to Work”.

For the Person who has Everything!

Bet you don’t have one of these? Bet you’ll want one? I know I do. How cool is this?

Could this be the best ever use for a deceased jellyfish? A bright spark has found an ingenious use for the corpses of the sea creatures: making them into glow-in-the-dark lamps.

In Tennesee, ‘The Amazing Jellyfish (theamazingjellyfish.com)’ take the bioluminescent bodies of creatures that have died of natural causes and encase them in resin, thus preserving not just their bodies, but also their incredible glow-in-the-dark properties.

Thanks to the phosphur proteins in their bodies – part of the defence mechanism that they use to frighten predators – jellyfish absorb light naturally, and emit it with an ethereal blueish glow when under darkened conditions.

How it Works

After a jellyfish dies, the firm freeze its body using liquid nitrogen, which they then set in crystalline resin – a special sort of epoxy that can withstand working at ultra low temperatures – creating a cast of the body, which is set in an ovoid mould shaped like the resulting lamp.

No extra light is needed – the natural radiance the jellyfish emit in a darkened room has been absorbed during the daylight hours.

However, some of the lamps come with a special base that can add an eerie glow to the jellyfish so that it can also be used as a more traditional light.

For the squeamish, it is worth pointing out that the transparent resin, crystalline epoxy, is strong and shatterproof, so will not break if dropped.