Can We Admit Afghanistan is Unwinnable

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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The supposed war in Afghanistan, or whatever we are calling it these days, is unwinnable. We have a better chance of converting Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer to Constitutional conservatism than prevailing in Afghanistan.

I believe this is the 16th year of this – whatever it is. I have friends in various branches of the military and frankly I don’t want to see another sent over there to die or be dismembered. How many more years will it take before someone in charge comes to their senses and admits to this folly?

It’s looking like several to an eternity, for president Trump, the man who in 2013 tweeted, “Let’s get out – our troops are being killed – we waste billions there,” is now considering adding up to 5,000 troops to the force of almost 8,500 already in Afghanistan.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said the President’s goal is “reducing the threat, especially when it comes to ISIS and the Taliban.” That’s a lofty and perilously vague goal.

Now, I get why President George W. Bush went into Afghanistan. In October 2001, the stated goal was to stamp out Afghanistan’s Islamic fundamentalist Taliban regime, which had aided and abetted al-Qaida and its leader, Osama bin Laden.

There was certainly good and actionable intelligence that bin Laden was there – so strikes went on for about a year and a half. It was then, in March of 2003, that Bush announced an escalation with the start of the war in Iraq. read more

Recalling the Preventable Tragedy of Extortion 17

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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The catastrophe at the compound in Benghazi, Libya has been well documented – books, movies, etc. Needless to say, there aren’t too many Americans who aren’t familiar with attack that killed four Americans, and the subsequent cover-up. To this day, no one has been held to account. Not Obama, Hillary, Susan Rice, etc.

Yet recently we were reminded of another entirely preventable event which took the lives of 38 fighters, 30 of which were American and 17 were U.S. Navy SEALs. The 17 included one officer and 9 senior enlisted – 7 Chiefs, 1 Senior and 1 Master Chief Petty Officer. Trust me when I say these gentlemen have been missed – not only to their loved ones, but operationally as well.

Sara Carter at Circa.com recounts the attack on Extortion 17, the August, 2011 downing of a Chinook helicopter gunship, and the greatest single day loss of Special Operations lives in American history. Mark Levin also highlighted this on his radio show the other evening.

Sara interviewed Retired Air Force Capt. Joni Marquez, who had a bird’s eye view of the whole tragic event – an event, which according to Marquez, was infinitely preventable if not for the ridiculous Rules of Engagement (ROEs) that have plagued our military from Vietnam to the present. However, under Obama, our warfighters had been particularly hamstrung.

Marquez told Carter that she was part of the aircrew of an Air Force AC-130 gunship in Afghanistan, when they received an order “to fly close-in air support above Afghanistan’s dangerous Tangi Valley, in Wardak Province, assisting troops with the Army’s 75th Ranger Regiment who were being fired on by eight heavily armed Taliban insurgents.” read more

Podcast – Terrorist Smuggled into U.S. – Zika Baby Born in America – Trump May get a Windfall of Sympathy

In this episode I discuss an Afghan man with ties to the Taliban who was smuggled into the United States after traveling through 10 separate countries to get here. He was apprehended by 5 Pakistani men who accompanied were given asylum.

Segment two the discussion turns to the first Zika baby born in the New York tri-state area and the mother was from Honduras, possibly getting here on a tourist visa, expressly to have her child in America.

Segment three: The Donald may actually win the general election, thanks in part due to violent anti-Trump protests repeatedly caught on video for undecided voters to see. He may actually get the sympathy vote from people outraged by anti-Trump violence.
read more

What’s Next For ISIS – Chemical Attacks?

by: the Common Constitutionalist

So, Mr. President – ISIS is contained and on the run, are they? Well, I agree with half – the on-the-run part. They are on the run – running all over the globe.

First though – remember this?

A report in the Wall Street Journal cited a German Defense Ministry official who said a mustard gas attack which took place on August 13 on roughly 60 Kurdish fighters in an area 40 miles southwest of Irbil, the capital of Iraq’s ethnic Kurd region.

Another attack occurred in August, where ISIS fired an estimated 59 shells and left as many as 25 people in the northern Syrian village of Marea contaminated by what has since been confirmed to have been mustard gas, a chemical weapon banned under the 1925 Geneva protocol.

Peshmerga fighters in northern Iraq have reported at least five attacks on their positions in northern Iraq in August and September with mortar shells or Katyusha rockets filled with sulphur mustard. read more

Obama Campaign Promise Being Fulfilled

by: the Common Constitutionalist

In 2008, on the campaign trail, Barack Obama vowed to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay Cuba. I have no doubt that this has stuck in his craw since then.

I contend that one way or the other King Barack is going to empty out that place and close it down. So much for Rush Limbaugh’s thriving Club Gitmo product line.

This move is part of the wind down and pull out of Afghanistan, a war Obama desperately wants to rid himself of, sooner than later, despite him saying years ago, that we should leave Iraq and concentrate on the good and worthy conflict in Afghanistan.

That’s one thing I do agree with – end the Afghan war and bring everyone home immediately. The United States no longer has any business over there or anywhere else, for that matter. We are incapable of the will that is necessary to win a war – so why get our troops killed and wounded due to modern America’s typically weak efforts. But I digress. read more

Bergdahl – Then and Now

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Okay; there’s a lot we know of deserter/possible traitor Bowe Bergdahl – some we still don’t know, and more that is coming to light – both of his situation and that of his oddball father Bob.

In 2010 a military investigation found that in 2009 Bowe did in fact walk off base and this evidently wasn’t the first time.

He did leave a note saying that he didn’t wish to fight for America anymore – that he didn’t support the Army mission.

Apparently some Afghans have come forward, saying that he was actually searching out the Taliban.

That leads to another salient point made by two actual American heroes. Col. Allen West said he wondered why Bergdahl’s throat wasn’t cut and then disemboweled, as is typical of the Taliban. Navy SEAL hero, Marcus Luttrell (Lone Survivor) wondered how he lasted that long without having his head cut off. Both good points made by actual heroes that were in the Afghan theater fighting the Taliban. Neither of them buy the POW routine.

And by the way – he was not a POW, not even by Geneva Convention standards! read more

Operation Eagle Strike III

from The Blaze:

Operation Eagle Strike III was supposed to be a single-day military strike, but it ended up erupting into a violent, nine-day clash between elite U.S. forces and the Taliban in the heart of one of Afghanistan’s most turbulent areas.

And as the chaos unfolded, journalists Mike and Carlos Boettcher, a father and son duo, were deep in the trenches alongside embattled U.S. troops. Mike, a veteran war journalist, had covered conflicts many times before — but there was something very different about this face-off. read more

Is This a Drone or UFO?

Okay, if this is a new kind of attack drone, it is the baddest on the planet and I want one!

The following video was filmed by a member of the U.S. military standing by an armored vehicle in Afghanistan. It was apparently filmed just this past March taking out a Taliban stronghold. From the looks of things, I’m guessing the Taliban didn’t fare well.

Watch the video and tell me what it is: read more

Medal Of Honor

A former Army staff sergeant who helped fight  off one of the largest and most brutal attacks against U.S. forces in  Afghanistan will receive the Medal of Honor next month, the White House said  Friday.

President Barack Obama will bestow the medal on Clinton Romesha of Minot, North Dakota, for his ‘courageous actions’ in  Afghanistan in 2009 while he was serving as a section leader during combat  operations against armed enemy forces at Combat Outpost Keating in the country’s  Nuristan Province.

Romesha, 31, will become the fourth living  service member to receive the nation’s highest award for valor for overseas duty  in Afghanistan or Iraq.

Romesha
Romesha's team
 Deadly battle: The attack against Romesha and his  comrades remains one of the deadliest against coalition forces in  Afghanistan

Seven other service members have been  posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions in those  wars.

The husband and father of three was a section  leader in B Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team,  4th Infantry Division, during the October 3, 2009, attack on the remote  mountaintop in eastern Afghanistan.

The attack remains one of the deadliest  against coalition forces in Afghanistan and is chronicled in the book ‘The  Outpost: An Untold Story of American Valor’ written by CNN’s Jake Tapper.

Eight U.S. soldiers were killed and two dozen  others were wounded in the battle in Nuristan as they fought against an  overwhelming Taliban insurgent force that launched the hostile attack to overrun  them.

The Taliban had been harassing the troopers  at Keating for several months, attacking them three or four times a week,  according to an account of the battle on Examiner.com.

Location of attack: The October 3, 2009, attack took place on the remote mountaintop in eastern Afghanistan's Nuristan ProvinceLocation of attack: The October 3, 2009, attack took  place on the remote mountaintop in eastern Afghanistan’s Nuristan Province

In total, 50 American, 20 Afghan and two  Latvian soldiers were stationed at the post in addition to a dozen or so Afghan  Security Guards.

Nearby, 19 American and 10 Afghan soldiers at  Observation Post Fritsche also came under heavy fire as well.

The enemy quickly brought mayhem on the two  posts firing a recoilless rifle, rocket-propelled grenades, mortars, machine  guns and rifles.

Two minutes into the attack, the first U.S.  soldier was killed as the enemy targeted the COP’s mortar pit and pinned down  the soldiers stationed at Fritsche, preventing them from providing supporting  fire to Keating.

The Afghan troops and security guards  reportedly abandoned their posts, leaving the Americans and Latvians to fight  alone.

Up close look: The attack occurred at Combat Outpost Keating in Afghanistan's Nuristan Province while Romesha was serving as a section leader during combat operations The attack occurred at Combat Outpost  Keating in Afghanistan’s Nuristan Province while Romesha was serving as a  section leader during combat operations

Within the first three hours of the battle,  mortars hit the two stations every 15 seconds, and in less than an hour, the  enemy swarmed Keating, eventually setting fire to the outpost and destroying  almost 70 per cent of it.

Romesha and his fellow soldiers fought back  for hours as heavy enemy fire came down on them from all directions.

The staff sergeant moved under intense enemy  fire to observe the battlefield and then went to seek reinforcements from the  barracks, according to the citation  accompanying Romesha’s Medal of Honor.

He returned to action with the support of an  assistant gunner, who is identified in ‘The Outpost’ as Corporal Justin  Gregory.

Romesha ‘took out an enemy machine gun team  and, while engaging a second, the generator he was using for cover was struck by  a rocket-propelled grenade, inflicting him with shrapnel wounds,’ according to  the citation.

Despite his injuries, Romesha continued to  fight, and as another soldier arrived to aid him he ‘rushed through the exposed  avenue to assemble additional soldiers.’

Romesha then mobilized a five-man team, which  he led back to the battle.

Recorded history: The deadly attack on Romesha and his team is chronicled in the book ¿The Outpost: An Untold Story of American Valor¿ written by CNN¿s Jake Tapper The deadly attack on Romesha and his  team is chronicled in the book ¿The Outpost: An Untold Story of American Valor  written by CNN’s Jake Tapper

‘With complete disregard for his own safety,  Romesha continually exposed himself to heavy enemy fire as he moved confidently  about the battlefield, engaging and destroying multiple enemy targets, including  three Taliban fighters who had breached the combat outpost’s perimeter,’ the  citation reads.

As the insurgent group attacked the outpost  with even ‘greater ferocity, unleashing a barrage of rocket-propelled grenades  and recoilless rifle rounds,’ Romesha ‘identified the point of attack and  directed air support to destroy over 30 enemy fighters.’

As soon as he learned that soldiers at the  other battle position were still alive, he and his team provided covering fire,  allowing three of their wounded comrades to reach the aid station, according to  the citation.

Romesha and his team also ran 100 meters  under fire to recover the bodies of their fallen comrades.

Romesha, the son of a leader of the Church of  Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church in Cedarville, California, has been  described as intense, short and wiry, according to Gannett’s Army  Times.

The 31-year-old war veteran will be awarded  the Medal of Honor at the White  House on February 11, according to  the announcement.

Attribution: Daily Mail