What was it that Ginsburg said?

by: Brent Smith

Let’s play a “did she say it” game. Ready?

Number one:

“There’s nothing in the Constitution that says the president stops being the president in his last year,” Ginsburg said in a 2016 New York Times interview in which she called for Merrick Garland to receive a confirmation vote in the Senate.

She then added as to whether the Senate should take up a vote on Garland, Ginsburg said at the time, “That’s their job.”

And now number two:

“My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,” Ginsburg told Clara Spera in the days before her death, NPR reported.

“Is this a trick question,” most would say. I mean, it says right there that Ginsburg said them both.” read more

Will Republicans Have the Courage to use the Reid Rule

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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Remember in 2013, when the New York Times wrote this? “The Senate changed its most infuriating rule and effectively ended the filibuster on executive and judicial appointments. From now on, if any senator tries to filibuster a presidential nominee, that filibuster can be stopped with a simple majority, not the 60-vote requirement of the past.”

They didn’t merely write it. They celebrated the news. “That means a return to the democratic process of giving nominees an up-or-down vote, allowing them to be either confirmed or rejected by a simple majority,” the Times added.

The NYT described the act as one of desperation by then Majority leader “Dingy” Harry Reid. The “nuclear option” as it has been dubbed, was the only way to “return to the democratic process.” Good guy Reid, “was pushed to act by the Republicans’ refusal to allow any appointments to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.”

ThinkProgress was a bit more harsh as they wrote in 2013 that, “The filibuster allows Republicans to sabotage government and then campaign on the fact that government isn’t working. This is a recipe for more sabotage.” read more