My WND Weekly Exclusive

Stupidity is in the eye of the beholder

I think most would agree that Cambridge professor Stephen Hawking is one the smartest guys on the planet. And given his several cameo appearances on “The Big Bang Theory,” he appears to have a good sense of humor. Yet even someone as brilliant as he can have some pretty wacky views.

Hawking says he believes “pollution and human ‘stupidity’ remain the biggest threats to mankind. …” I certainly agree with him regarding “stupidity” being a major threat. After all, look how many millions voted for Hillary Clinton. read more

Will A.I. Be a Good Thing?

from Breitbart:

Professor Stephen Hawking has warned that humans must understand the implications of artificial intelligence or risk being eliminated by it. The comments came in an opinion piece in the Independent and coincides with the release of the film Transcendence starring Johnny Depp.

In the film, a scientist is uploaded up a computer system in order to ensure his mind outlives his body. But what is uploaded is able to build an enormous amount of knowledge by connecting to the Internet and ultimately becomes a threat to humanity itself. The reason for this is it is not inhibited by the limits of the human body. read more

Above Average

A four-year-old girl has been accepted into Mensa with an IQ almost as high as Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein.

Brainy Heidi Hankins – who hasn’t even started school yet – sat an IQ test after staff at her nursery said she was so intelligent they were struggling to find activities to challenge her.

The exceptional youngster wowed examiners with an impressive score of 159. The average score for an adult is 100 and for ‘gifted’ individuals is 130.

She beats TV mathematician Carol Vorderman (score 154), also a member of Mensa and is only slightly behind Big Bang scientist Stephen Hawking and legendary physicist Albert Einstein both with IQs of160.

At two-years-old Heidi could already count to 40, add and subtract, Read after teaching herself using the family computer recite the poem The Owl and The Pussycat by Edward Lear.

Heidi draw figures and write in sentences – was reading books for seven year olds when she was just two.

The test she took, is specifically designed fro children her age and contains a mixture of problem-solving puzzles and word games.

Heidi’s father, Matthew, from Winchester, Hants, England hopes she can now skip a school year to ensure she is adequately challenged.

The University of Southampton public health lecturer, 46, added: ‘We always thought Heidi was bright because she was reading early.

‘I was curious about her IQ and the results were off the scale. I got her the complete set of the Oxford Reading Tree books when she was two and she read through the whole set of 30 in about an hour.

‘It’s what you would expect a seven-year-old to do.

Attribution: Mail Online