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Andrew Yang’s Dream is about to come True – In Spain

Oh this will not end well. But it’s sure to make former democrat candidate for president, Andrew Yang, happy. And along with the “basic” income, will come all sorts rules and regulations people will have to adhere to. It will be great.

Might I suggest that the European Union disband, and quickly, before they get stuck fitting the bill for this lunacy.

from the Blaze:

Spain to implement universal basic income in response to coronavirus — and the change will be permanent

Not just for the crisis

Spain is responding to the coronavirus crisis with a plan to launch a universal basic income program in the near future, Forbes reported, but the program isn’t just for the pandemic — it will become permanent, Spain’s Economy Minister Nadia Calvino said. read more

Ingenious Under-Bridge Shelter

The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas
The shelter was created by Spanish self-taught designer Fernando Abellanas (Credit: Jose Manuel Pedrajas)

If trolls really did live under bridges, they could do a lot worse than commission Spaniard Fernando Abellanas to build them a new home. The self-taught designer recently installed a novel shelter under an anonymous traffic bridge in Valencia that includes shelving, seating, and even a sleeping space. read more

The Treasure That Sank the Spanish Empire

 

The stunning treasures from a sunken Spanish  galleon have been revealed for the first time after the ship was rediscovered  nearly 400 years on from its wreck in the Gulf of Mexico.

The loss of the Buen Jesus y Nuestra Senora  del Rosario along with seven other ships destroyed the Bank of Madrid – and even  contributed to the collapse of the Spanish Empire.

Now deep-sea divers believe they have found  its wreck 400m deep, with 17,000 objects on board revealing that it was carrying  gold, pearls – and even parrots.

Treasure: Some of the 27 gold bars recovered from the wreck of Buen Jesus y Nuestra Senora del Rosario
 Some of the 27 gold bars recovered from the  wreck of Buen Jesus y Nuestra Senora del Rosario

 

Unique: These pearls are from a rare species of oyster found in seabeds off the coast of Venezuela
 These pearls are from a rare species of oyster  found in seabeds off the coast of Venezuela

 

Precious: The loss of the treasure, such as this chain weighing half a kilogram, devastated Spain's economy
The loss of the treasure, such as this chain weighing half a kilogram, devastated Spain’s economy

Galleon: This image of 16th-century Seville shows a ship similar to that lost in the Gulf of Mexico
This image of 16th-century Seville shows a ship  similar to that lost in the Gulf of Mexico

The discovery unveiled today gives a  fascinating glimpse into the sometimes unexpected treasures which made the  colonial economy run.

The wreck site, around 400 miles from the  Florida Keys, contains 39 gold bars, and nearly 1,200 silver pieces of  eight.

More unusually, the site features more than  6,600 pearls being exported to Europe from the coast of  Venezuela.

The gems came from a type of oyster which was  unique to South America but which was nearly extinct by the early 17th century  thanks to over-exploitation by colonial traders.

Bullion: A gold bar stamps with official marks certifying its purity and taxation status
 A gold bar stamps with official marks  certifying its purity and taxation status

 

Vessels: These ceramic jars and tableware were used to furnish the doomed ship on its voyage
 These ceramic jars and tableware were used to  furnish the doomed ship on its voyage

 

Precious: A selection of the jewels and precious stones being transported from the New World to the Old
A selection of the jewels and precious stones  being transported from the New World to the Old

Certificate: A stamp reading 'en rada' operating as a sort of guarantee of the gold's origin
 A stamp reading ‘en rada’ operating as a  sort of guarantee of the gold’s origin

And it was not only wildlife to suffer from  the oyster trade – 60,000 Caribbean natives are believed to have died while  diving for pearls on behalf of the Spanish.

In addition to the precious metals and  jewels, two bird’s bones were found at the site, thought to have come from a  blue-headed parrot.

The parrots made popular pets because of  their bright plumage and ability to mimic human speech, but this is the first  time the remains of one have been found in a shipwreck.

Another glimpse of everyday life in the early  modern world comes from a tortoiseshell comb for lice apparently made by a  member of the ship’s crew.

Jar: The artefacts found by the Odyssey expedition have not been seen for nearly 400 years
The artefacts found by the Odyssey expedition have not been seen for nearly 400 years

 

Astrolabe: This was used to navigate by the stars but did not help the ship avoid a devastating hurricane
 This was used to navigate by the stars but  did not help the ship avoid a devastating hurricane

 

Riches: But the empire was deep in debt and the wreck of its ships contributed to its downfall
 But the empire was deep in debt and the wreck of  its ships contributed to its downfall

 

Examination: An archaeologist holding silver retrieved from the wreck 400m deep in the Gulf of Mexico
An archaeologist holding silver retrieved  from the wreck 400m deep in the Gulf of Mexico

The Buen Jesus y Nuestra Senora del Rosario  was one of a fleet of 28 Spanish merchants hit by a hurricane on September 5,  1622.

Eight were sunk, killing 500 people on board  and hiding their treasure for nearly four centuries.

The Spanish economy had been relying on the  boost it would have received from the ships’ arrival, and the disaster  contributed to the eventual downfall of the formerly all-powerful colonial  empire.

To the rescue: The Seahawk Retriever moored over the site of the shipwreck
 The Seahawk Retriever moored over the  site of the shipwreck

 

Delicate: Cutting-edge technology was used to retrieve the valuable treasures from the seabed
Cutting-edge technology was used to retrieve  the valuable treasures from the seabed

 

Handle with care: Team members examine containers full of ceramic jars from the Buen Jesus
Team members examine containers full  of ceramic jars from the Buen Jesus

 

Machinery: This filtration system designed to sift small finds was specially designed for the expedition
This filtration system designed to sift small  finds was specially designed for the expedition

Excavations at the site of the wreck have  been going on for more than 20 years, using deep-sea technology developed by  British engineers to drill for oil in the North Sea.

They were carried out by Odyssey Marine  Exploration, whose president Greg Stemm told The Times: ‘This is the major find  of our time.’

The objects excavated from the Rosario are  going on display at the company’s headquarters in Florida.

Oceans Odyssey 3, a book on the shipwreck and  its contents, is published today by Oxbow Books.

Find: The site of the shipwreck is around 400 miles away from the Florida Keys
 The site of the shipwreck is around 400 miles away  from the Florida Keys

 

Attribution: Hugo Gye, Mail Online

Night Over the Spanish Desert

The following stunning shots were taken by amateur photographer Martin Zalba, a high school music teacher from Navarra, Spain. He said his images of storms  in the Spanish desert owe as much to luck as they do technical skill. Looks pretty skillful to me.

Image of Storm in the Spanish desert
Lightning is pictured along with a house in the Bardenas of Navarra
A lightning bolt strikes near a house in the Bardenas of Navarra, Spain
A lightning bolt strikes near a house in the Bardenas of Navarra, Spain.  Amateur photographer Martin Zalba said his images of lightning bolts in the Spanish desert owe as much to luck as they do technical skill...
The night sky over the Bardenas of Navarra
The Milky Way behind ruins in Paredes de Nava, Palencia
ruins in Paredes de Nava, Palencia
Bardenas Reales de Navarra
Lightning is pictured in the Bardenas of Navarra
Cantabrian Sea coast of Spain. It could be a painting.
Cantabrian Sea coast of Spain
Lightning is pictured in the Bardenas of Navarra
A house belonging to shepherds in the Bardenas of Navarra
A house belonging to the sheep herders is pictured  in the Bardenas of Navarra

Attribution: UK Telegraph

No Surfing at This Beach

Tucked away in a lush green meadow, this is quite possibly the weirdest beach you’re ever likely to see.

Gulpiyuri beach is an extraordinary stretch of shoreline near the town of Llanes in northern Spain, which boasts stunning crystal-clear salt waters that are even fully tidal.

Incredibly there are even waves lapping up against the 130 foot stretch of golden sand making the whole experience even more magical so it’s almost impossible to resist taking a dip, although the temperatures can be rather cold.

The beach is fed by salt water from the Bay of Biscay on the Cantabrian Sea. Over millions of years the waves eroded a series of tunnels under the cliffs which connect to the beach.

Gulpiyuri is hidden away in a series of gentle hills over 320 feet away from the sea. Despite it being hard to find it has become a mecca for tourists on weekends.

Attribution: Mail Online