WND Exclusive -Accountability for Sexcapades: Only in Private Sector

Scandals involving every sort of impropriety have been blowing up over the last year. Virtually all of them involve Hollywood and Washington, D.C.

This year has shaped up, like no other, to be the year of the scandal. I wonder if the Chinese could, at this late date, retroactively change 2017 from the Year of the Rooster, to the Year of the Scandal? It’s probably too late. However, the way things are shaping up, 2018 will likely bring more of the same.

A woman called into Rush Limbaugh’s national radio program Thursday to discuss the topic of scandals. But it wasn’t just regarding the scandals themselves, but the response to them. read more

So a Priest, a Minister and a Rabbi…

Who did build that business, then, Mr. President?

by: Vincent Carroll

Let’s be honest: If the nearest priest, minister or rabbi had uttered essentially the same words about personal merit that got President Obama in trouble recently, we’d have hardly thought twice about it.

Reminding high-achievers that they didn’t make it on their own — that they’re not necessarily any smarter or more hard-working than lots of other folks — is a time-honored means of cultivating the virtues of gratitude and humility, not to mention a sense of realism.

But Obama is not a priest, minister or rabbi. He’s a man with his hand on the tiller of economic policy, and his attitude toward entrepreneurs, innovators and business owners in general is of major importance. So when he says, “If you’ve got a business, you didn’t build that,” it tends to grab public attention — despite the creative claims of his campaign to portray his remarks as merely indicating that business owners hadn’t built “roads and bridges.”

Sorry to his campaign, but that’s not what he said. He said they didn’t build their businesses, while deprecating their savvy and hard work as the engines of success.

Now it’s true, as the MaddowBlog quickly pointed out, that Mitt Romney himself made much the same point when he said “a lot of people help you in a business. Perhaps the banks, the investors. There’s no question your mom and dad. Your school teachers. The people that provide roads, the fire, and the police. A lot of people help.”

What Romney did not say, though, was “you didn’t build” your business — and even if he had, there are two big differences between Romney saying it and the president.

First, we know Romney believes in an entrepreneurial culture. He’s lived it. And he extols free enterprise all the time as the foundation of prosperity.

By contrast, Obama’s background is bereft of any significant first-hand experience that might foster respect or sympathy for business owners. To the contrary, he hails from occupational niches — community activism, academia and politics — in which disdain for commerce is quite widespread.

Of course, you can be a law professor or a politician who bucks the ideological tide. Far more telling is that Obama for years has been making similar statements that suggest a decidedly low regard for commerce and the motives of those who flourish within the private sector.

One of these revealing moments occurred four years ago during his commencement address at Wesleyan University, when he exhorted graduates to take up community service. That’s a worthy theme, of course, but consider how he did it.

“There’s no community service requirement in the real world; no one forcing you to care,” he said. “You can take your diploma, walk off this stage, and chase only after the big house and the nice suits and all the other things that our money culture says you should buy. You can choose to narrow your concerns and live your life in a way that tries to keep your story separate from America’s. But I hope you don’t.”

Several times elsewhere in his speech, Obama cited public sector jobs as examples of meaningful work. The candidate basically offered graduates the following choice: meaningful work in the non-profit and public sectors, on the one hand, or money-grubbing that chases big houses and nice suits. To call this a caricature would be kind.

This nation is engaged in a decisive debate about how to revive an economy mired in slow growth and meager job creati0n, so naturally we pay attention to a candidate’s views of how the economy works. If Obama wants critics to stop saying he’s disdainful of business, maybe he should stop providing them with evidence for the charge.

The Power of American Exceptionalism

by: Demetrius Minor

This election year’s theme has evolved around one common theme: the identity of America. We’ve heard the rallying voices calling for “restoring”, “believing”, “saving” and “reviving” America. There is this undeniable feeling that America is wayward, distraught and dysfunctional.

The choice is quite simple and fundamental: we can continue to march towards an European socialist society or we can be a nation of economic prosperity, constitutional liberty and freedom. America’s soul has been entrenched by big government welfare and mandates that infringe on individual rights. The enhancement of government, by means of a weak and anemic private sector, has changed America from being an economic promised land to a nation that is being defined by unemployment, joblessness, a divided political front and a lack of efficient leadership at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

It is embarrassing and shameful that we currently have a President who does not understand the power of American Exceptionalism. It is quite common for President Obama to travel worldwide “apologizing” for what he perceives to be the flaws and imperfections of America. I wish he would express gratitude for this country.

American Exceptionalism is about being what you dream to be. It’s about taking advantage of the fact that America is one of the greatest nations known to mankind and that it flourishes with plenty of opportunities for many individuals to succeed. American Exceptionalism is not about government dependency. While the absence of government in its entirety would lead to a society in total chaos and disorder, it is the notion that government will meet all your needs that has caused many to be apathetic and indolent.

American Exceptionalism is about YOU. It is about having a good work ethic. It is the blissful reminder that if you dream and believe in God and yourself, that you can indeed be what you want to be. It is not about piggybacking off of other’s successes and blessings. It is not about being entitled to something without working hard and diligently for it. American Exceptionalism promotes the idea that America is great and that the power of free is what makes individuals successful in life. The idea of big government necessity is pure selfishness. The fact that many just want to depend on the government to provide them services without putting in the work and effort as others, is not only selfishness, but its robbery from those who have worked diligently in their life.

I refuse to adhere to the thought that government serves as a lifeguard and rescue mission. My success in life is dependent on Almighty God, the encouragement of family & friends, and the effort I personally put in to achieving my goals. Many may perceive this to be an egotistical analysis. On the contrary, it’s the beauty of American Exceptionalism. Don’t ride the coattails of government. Empower YOURSELF.