Weapon Wednesday – Is This the Next Army Battle Rifle?

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FDM TECHNOLOGY

The U.S. Army has ordered a prototype of a weapon designed in a garage in Colorado Springs. The weapon is electrically fired, has four barrels and can fire all four rounds at once in a single devastating salvo. read more

Weapon Wednesday – Are Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems a Good Idea?

Salon Eurosatory 2018

GETTY IMAGESCHRISTOPHE MORIN/IP3

As the power of artificial intelligence grows, the likelihood of a future war filled with killer robots grows as well. Proponents suggest that lethal autonomous weapon systems (LAWs) might cause less “collateral damage,” while critics warn that giving machines the power of life and death would be a terrible mistake.

Last month’s UN meeting on ‘killer robots’ in Geneva ended with victory for the machines, as a small number of countries blocked progress towards an international ban. Some opponents of such a ban, like Russia and Israel, were to be expected since both nations already have advanced military AI programs. But surprisingly, the U.S. also agreed with them. read more

Weapon Wednesday – Army’s New Reconnaissance Helicopter

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Sikorsky

The U.S. Army seeks a new armed reconnaissance helicopter that will range across the battlefield, acting as the eyes and ears of commanders on the ground. Planned for an introduction in the 2020s, the Future Armed Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) would give the Army back a capability it lost when the service put its scout helicopters out to pasture. read more

Weapon Wednesday – Augmented Reality Tank

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LIMPIDARMOR YOUTUBE

New technology promises to give tankers an unprecedented view of the battlefield around themwithout exposing them to lethal enemy fire. Camera systems, often linked to VR headsets, can provide soldiers with a real-time view of the world outside their tank, eliminating the often severely restricted view tankers are forced to fight with. read more

IBM’s Coffee Delivery Drone

ibm coffee drone

IBM/US PATENT OFFICE

A new patent from IBM could bring new meaning to instant coffee. The patent describes a drone that could detect when a person is tiring and fly over with a cup of coffee on demand—so no need to worry if yours is the one street corner without a Starbucks.

In its patent, IBM imagines a drone, or unmanned aerial vehicle, flying over a group of people and: read more

Weapon Wednesday – DSRaider – Military ATV

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DSRAIDER

U.S. military forces are testing a new, lightweight one-person electric vehicle. The DSRaider all-terrain vehicle has the advantages of traditional ATVs in a smaller, more compact package. Ridden upright like a Segway and capable of carrying more than three hundred pounds across rough terrain, the DSRaider is aimed at soldiers, first responders, and outdoorsmen. read more

Weapon Wednesday – Israel Prefers F-15 to F-35

ISRAEL-DEFENCE-GRADUATION

GETTY IMAGESJACK GUEZ

The Israeli Air Force would rather buy more F-15 Eagle fighters than the latest and greatest F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. It may be an older plane, but the F-15 apparently offers Israel more flexibility, particularly when striking its mortal enemy: Iran. read more

Weapon Wednesday – New Fighter Aircraft Coming

Boeing

The announcement of the United Kingdom’s new Tempest fighter project marks yet another new fighter program set to delivery in the 2030s. In addition to Tempest, a new Japanese fighter, a Franco-German project, and whatever China and Russia are surely working on, the United States has not one but two fighter jets. read more

Weapon Wednesday – Special Operations Rapidly Deployable Field Workshops

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

U.S. Special Operations Forces operate a fleet of portable, rapidly deployable field workshops that can repair, manufacture, or even improve equipment in the field. The workshops, known as Mobile Technology Repair Complexes, are powered by renewable energy and stuffed with tools including lathes, welders, and 3D printers. MTRCs have proven their worth in the war against the Islamic State in Syria, quickly building ad hoc medical facilities from available materials. read more