Sailfish Hunters

These incredible pictures show the formidable hunting skills of sailfish as they pick off sardines off the coast of Mexico.

The sailfish arrive at the Isla Mujeres every year to feast on the migrating sardines as part of an incredible natural spectacle known as the ‘Sailfish Run’, and were captured by underwater photographer Dr Peter Allinson.

The sailfish work as a group, using their sails to herd the schools of sardines, and then charge at high speed through the ball of fish, known as the bait ball, slashing with their swords to kill or stun prey before returning to consume their catch.

Bulls-eye! The sailfish's sword pierces a sardine in this incredible underwater photo taken off the coast of the Isla Mujeres in Mexico
Bulls-eye! The sailfish’s sword pierces a sardine in this incredible underwater photo taken off the coast of the Isla Mujeres in Mexico

 

To the victor go the spoils: The sailfish arrive at the Isla Mujeres in Mexico every year to feast on the migrating sardines
To the victor go the spoils: The sailfish arrive at the Isla Mujeres in Mexico every year to feast on the migrating sardines

The Atlantic sailfish, also found in the Caribbean, weighs up to 58 kilos. It has been clocked at 110 kilometres per hour (68mph) making it the quickest fish in the ocean.

Dr Allinson, 64, said: ‘A couple of years ago, someone got the idea that game fishing off the coast of Mexico could yield some photos of the fish underwater.

‘You wind up about 20-40 miles offshore, looking for signs of a bait ball of sardines. The most obvious sign are birds repeatedly diving in to feed.

‘You then hop in, swim as fast as you can to keep up with the sardine bait ball and sailfish hunting them.

Predators: The sailfish use teamwork and their massive sails to herd the sardines into position
Predators: The sailfish use teamwork and their massive sails to herd the sardines into position

 

The Atlantic sailfish can hit 68mph, making it the quickest fish in the ocean
The Atlantic sailfish can hit 68mph, making it the quickest fish in the ocean
The photographer said: 'It's all very quick. They are an amazingly fast fish. Blink your eye and it is over'
The photographer said: ‘It’s all very quick. They are an amazingly fast fish. Blink your eye and it is over’

‘It’s all very quick. They are an amazingly fast fish. Blink your eye and it is over.

‘But it’s really cool to watch the sailfish cooperate as they snack on the sardines.’

Dr Allinson, from Florida, who specialises in underwater and hyperbaric Medicine, added: ‘It can get a bit scary at times as the sailfish charge at and through the bait balls and frequently nearly impale you.’

One of these shots has been awarded The David Doubilet Award for Excellence in Underwater Photography for best in show at the 2013 Beneath the Sea photo contest.

Dr Allinson said photographing the fish can be a scary affair as they move so fast and nearly impaled him
The sailfish charge at high speed through the ball of fish slashing with their swords to kill prey
 Dr Allinson said photographing the fish can be a scary affair as they move so fast and nearly impaled him

Attribution: Sam Webb, Mail Online

D-Day Heroes Return to Normandy

 

They’re iconic images which capture the brutal reality of the D-Day landings 69 years ago today – but they were nearly lost forever.

War photographer Robert Capa took these remarkable close-up photos – named The Magnificent Eleven – which show Allied troops in the second wave landing on Omaha beach in Normandy on June 6, 1944.

The Hungarian bravely took 106 photographs while wading through the water just off the French coast but because of a blunder when processing the film in London, all but 11 of the images were lost.

 
Grainy close-up: A US troop is seen crouching in the water off Omaha Beach, Normandy, as the second wave of troops landed on D-Day in the early hours of June 6, 1944
Grainy close-up: An Allied troop is seen crouching in the water off Omaha Beach, Normandy, as the second wave of troops landed on D-Day in the early hours of June 6

The images were sent to Life magazine’s office in Britain where picture editor John Morris told staff in the dark room to ‘rush!’ as they did the developing.

In their haste, worker Dennis Banks shut the doors on a wooden locker where the film was drying and 95 of the images melted as the negatives were destroyed.

Three whole rolls were lost, and more than half of the fourth.The useless film was tossed in a dustbin that same night and lost forever.

There were no other pictures taken from so close to the frontline landings on D-Day so The Magnificent Eleven provide the only enduring images from Normandy.

 
Storming the beach: The US servicemen run towards the shore as they come under fire from Nazi machine guns. Robert Capa captured these remarkable images from the water
Storming the beach: The servicemen run towards the shore as they come under fire from Nazi machine guns. Robert Capa captured these images from the waterCapa was aboard a landing ship carrying Company E of 16th Regiment, First Infantry of the US Army which landed on Omaha beach in the early hours of June 6.As machine guns were fired all around him, the troops – and the war photographer – waded towards the beach under heavy enemy fire.Omaha beach proved to be the worst killing field of the first day of the invasion, with an estimated 3,000 US soldiers killed within a matter of hours.He later wrote in his book, called Slightly out of Focus: ‘The men from my barge waded in the water. Waist-deep, with rifles ready to shoot, with the invasion obstacles and the smoking beach in the background gangplank to take my first real picture of the invasion.
 
Normandy landing: More US troops can be seen crouching in the water, with their landing crafts in the background just off the shore. Although Capa took 106 pictures, all but 11 of them were destroyed
Normandy landing: More Allied troops can be seen crouching in the water, with their landing crafts in the background just off the shore. Although Capa took 106 pictures, all but 11 of them were destroyed

D-DAY LANDINGS AT OMAHA BEACH

Around 160,000 Allied troops landed in Normandy on June 6, 1944.

There was an initial airbourne assault with 24,000 being parachuted into France before the sea landings began at dawn.

Omaha Beach is five miles long and one of five sections of coastline that troops landed on.

However, they met strong resistance from the German forces who were stationed at strongpoints along the coastline.

The Americans suffered 2,400 casualties on D-Day on Omaha Beach – although around 34,000 troops landed successfully.

The landings were chaotic with boats arriving at the wrong point and others getting into difficulties in the water.

Troops managed only to gain a small foothold on the beach – but they built on their initial breakthrough in the coming days and a harbour was opened at Omaha.

‘The boatswain, who was in an understandable hurry to get the hell out of there, mistook my picture-taking attitude for explicable hesitation, and helped me make up my mind with a well-aimed kick in the rear. The water was cold, and the beach still more than a hundred yards away.’

He dived for cover behind a steel object before heading onward in the water for a disabled American tank as he snapped away furiously.

The photographer held his camera high above his head to stop his precious film being damaged and later ran towards an incoming landing craft. He was hauled aboard and spirited away to England where most of his shots were inadvertently destroyed in the developing room.

Capa, who died in 1954 in Vietnam while working after stepping on a landmine, was wrongly listed as dead in the aftermath of the battle.

But he got away with his pictures – and the remaining 11 were first printed in the US Life magazine on June 19, 1944.

Some of the images are blurred, which the magazine said was because Capa was so excited when he took the photographs he was shaking. It is possible that the damage was instead done in the darkroom.

Steven Spielberg said that when making the D-Day film Saving Private Ryan he ‘did everything’ to make the action scenes look like the stills taken by Capa.

He was famed for the phrase: ‘If your pictures aren’t good enough, you aren’t close enough’. And on D-Day he was the only person to get near enough to the frontline to take decent pictures – and survive.

Robert Capa also took pictures of the Spanish Civil War, in Russia in the aftermath of World War II and of the First Indochina War during the course of a distinguished career.

 
Running towards the beach: The second wave of American troops lands on Omaha Beach at dawn on June 6, 1944
Running towards the beach: The second wave of American troops lands on Omaha Beach at dawn on June 6, 1944
 
Bloody conflict: After capturing these pictures, Capa ran towards another landing craft holding his camera above his head so it didn't get wet before climbing aboard. He was spirited away to England so his pictures could be developed
Bloody conflict: After capturing these pictures, Capa ran towards another landing craft holding his camera above his head so it didn’t get wet before climbing aboard. He was spirited away to England so his pictures could be developed

 
D-Day landings: This map shows where in Normandy British, US and Canadian troops landed from on June 6, 1944
D-Day landings: This map shows where in Normandy British, US and Canadian troops landed from on June 6, 1944
 
Landings: Omaha beach, shown here secured after D-Day, was used as a harbour by Allied Troops and an entry-point into France. The initial June 6 landings were chaotic - but the troops were able to build on the small early gains
Landings: Omaha beach, shown here secured after D-Day, was used as a harbor by Allied Troops and an entry-point into France. The initial June 6 landings were chaotic – but the troops were able to build on the small early gains

 

 
Saving Private Ryan: Tom Hanks pictured as Captain John Miller,in a scene from the film reinacting the D-Day invasion of Normandy, as the American forces storm Omaha Beach
Saving Private Ryan: The American forces storm Omaha Beach during the massive D-Day invasion of Normandy
 Inspiration: Steven Spielberg studied on Robert Capa’s images – later named The Magnificent Eleven – of the D-Day landings when he tried to recreate them in his 1998 film Saving Private Ryan

 

 
The yellow sands where the invasion happened: Modern images of Omaha Beach, in Normandy, France, where Allied troops first came ashore on June 6, 1944
The yellow sands where the invasion happened: Modern images of Omaha Beach, in Normandy, France, where Allied troops first came ashore on June 6, 1944
 The yellow sands where the invasion happened: Modern images of Omaha Beach, in Normandy, France, where Allied troops first came ashore on June 6, 1944
 
Arrival: Commando troops are seen walking ashore on another section of beach in the aftermath of the D-Day landings
Arrival: Commando troops are seen walking ashore on another section of beach in the aftermath of the D-Day landings

 
Filming: 'The Monuments Men' filming on the South Coast of England
Cover: Life magazine from June 19, 1944, when Robert Capa's 11 images were published
 D-Day: The famous battle is recreated for a new film ‘The Monuments Men’ on Camber Sands (above). Below: The cover of Life magazine from June 19, 1944, when Robert Capa’s 11 images – later named The Magnificent Eleven – were first published
 
Reenactment: George Clooney films the 'The Monuments Men' D-Day landings on Camber Sands, East Sussex, yesterday, the day before the 69th anniversary
Reenactment: George Clooney films the ‘The Monuments Men’ D-Day landings on Camber Sands, East Sussex, yesterday, the day before the 69th anniversary

 

 
War reenactment: The cast film The Monuments Men on Camber Sands Beach, East Sussex, yesterday
War reenactment: The cast film The Monuments Men on Camber Sands Beach, East Sussex, yesterday

 

 

Back to the frontline: World War II veteran, 88, returns to Normandy 69 years after the D-Day landings

 

A war hero who fought during the Normandy landings is returning to the battlefields that nearly claimed his life to mark the 69th anniversary today.

Ivor Anderson, 88, from Salford, dropped in at Pegasus Bridge, near the village of Ranville, Normandy, overnight on June 5, 1944.

The grandfather-of-two joined the Royal Engineers as an apprentice in 1938 – aged just 14 – but later became part of the 591 Para Squadron.

He returns to the spot where he fought today under a lottery scheme which is paying for World War II veterans to make emotional trips back almost 70 years on.

 
D-Day landings: Ivor Anderson, 88, is seen here (third from the right) at Fairford Aerodrome as he prepares to take off for Normandy on D-Day - June 6th, 1944. Today he is returning to the place where he landed
D-Day landings: Ivor Anderson, 88, is seen here (third from the right) at Fairford Aerodrome as he prepares to take off for Normandy on D-Day – June 6th, 1944. Today he is returning to the place where he landed
 
Then and now: World War II veteran Ivor Anderson, 88, wearing his medals here, is returning to the spot where he landed
Ivor Anderson, 88, pictured aged 18 after he completed his parachute course and was awarded his wings
 Then and now: World War II veteran Ivor Anderson, 88, pictured above wearing his medals and below when he was in the army during the war, is returning to Normandy today
 
Normandy veterans attend a remembrance and wreath laying ceremony to commemorate the start of the D-Day landings at Bayeux War Cemetery today
Normandy veterans attend a remembrance and wreath laying ceremony to commemorate the start of the D-Day landings at Bayeux War Cemetery today

 

 
Across Normandy, several hundred of the surviving veterans of the Normandy campaign are gathering to commemorate the 69th anniversary of the D-Day landings
Across Normandy, several hundred of the surviving veterans of the Normandy campaign are gathering to commemorate the 69th anniversary of the D-Day landings

Ivor said: ‘We were all in pretty good spirits and there was a good singalong during the first part of the flight. Once over the Channel we all quietened down and made ready for the jump into darkness.

‘Our job was to clear the landing ground for the Allied gliders. We had been told there were broad areas of heavy upright posts all around the bridge region, and it was down to us to wrap explosive charges around these so that gliders could land unobstructed.

‘When I jumped out I had the bren gun strapped to my ankles. We only had 20 minutes and the gliders were coming in at all angles.

‘Our job then was to protect the landing site from anyone who was going to attack it. It was a bit threatening because we were being shelled and mortared the whole time.’

After the mission, Ivor spent five weeks laying mines and helping the infantry, before an incident ended his army involvement.

‘It was a mortar or a shell,’ he said. ‘We were holding a position and we were hit.

‘The next thing I remember is waking up in the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham. It turned out I had been half buried with shrapnel in my leg, and I was pulled out.’

Ivor, who did his Paratrooper training at Manchester Airport, is having his trip funded by the Big Lottery Fund’s Our Heroes Return programme.

The charity scheme allows World War II veterans to make commemorative visits to the places where they fought and served.

Scores of retired soldiers are making the voyage to France today to mark the anniversary of the D-Day landings and pay their respects to fallen comrades.

Ivor added: ‘I go back most years. It’s very poignant, especially at certain places where friends got killed.

‘It’s very sad to see again, but the local people treat us very, very well.’

 
Jim Kelly, 90, was a Royal Marine who landed on Sword Beach on D-Day
Jim Kelly, 90, was a Royal Marine who landed on Sword Beach on D-Day
 
 
A former soldier looks at the headstones of fallen comrades
Veteran Bob Barker, 90, at the Bayeux War Cemetery
 A former soldier looks at the headstones of fallen comrades; right, veteran Bob Barker, 90, at the Bayeux War Cemetery

 

 
Next year, which will mark the 70th anniversary of the landings, is widely expected to be the last time that the veterans will gather in any great number
Next year, which will mark the 70th anniversary of the landings, is widely expected to be the last time that the veterans will gather in any great number

 

 
Veterans (l to r) Victor Urch, 88 and Frank Baugh, 89 (who were in the Royal Navy dropping troops and supplies onto Sword Beach) and Derek Whitehead, 88
Veterans (l to r) Victor Urch, 88 and Frank Baugh, 89 (who were in the Royal Navy dropping troops and supplies onto Sword Beach) and Derek Whitehead, 88 (who was in the Durham Light Infantry and was on Gold Beach on D-Day) share a joke as they walk along what was the British Sword beach at Colleville Montgomery near Caen, France

 

 
Major Edwin Hunt walks up from the beach at Colleville Montgomery yesterday
Major Edwin Hunt walks up from the beach at Colleville Montgomery yesterday
 
Attribution: Rob Cooper, Mail Online 

Tilt shift Photos

 

The Wonders of the World have always inspired awe in visitors.

But if it’s possible, these mind-bending photos of them will prompt more gasps.

Wonders of the world have been transformed into their mini-versions in a seven-year round the world adventure – that cost $31,000.

 
A new view: The Pyramids and the Great Sphinx of Giza, Egypt are given a new look in this mind-bending photo 
 The colossal Pyramids and the Great Sphinx of Giza, in Egypt – which measures 241ft long – are given a new look in this mind-bending photo

 

 
The Pyramids in Egypt are transformed into its mini-versions in a seven-year round the world adventure 
The Pyramids in Giza, which covers an area of 566,000 sq ft, are transformed into its mini-versions in a seven-year round the world adventure

 

 
One of the most famous sights in the world, the Taj Mahal in Agra, India, is given a fresh perspective through camera trickery 
One of the most famous sights in the world, the Taj Mahal mausoleum in Agra, India, which took 20,000 workers to build, is given a fresh perspective through camera trickery

 

 
Chichen Itza, a pyramid built by the Maya civilization, Mexico is part of the eye-popping visual feast from across the planet 
Chichen Itza, a pyramid built by the Maya civilization in a large pre-Columbian city in Mexico is part of the eye-popping visual feast from across the planet
 
A pair of fresh eyes: The Atlas Mountains, Morocco appear peculiarly small because of the creative focus 
 The Atlas Mountains, Morocco, which extend for 1,200 miles, appear peculiarly small because of the creative focus
  
 
 
Mini models! The colourful houses that sprawl across Reykjavik, the largest city and capital of Iceland, look like they could be dolls houses 
Mini models! The colourful houses that sprawl across Reykjavik, the largest city and capital of Iceland, look like they could be dolls houses

From ancient wonders like the legendary Acropolis of Greece and the stone heads of Easter Island to modern icons such as the famous Brooklyn Bridge in New York and London’s Houses of Parliament – these are the mini-monuments that will dazzle you.

Other outstanding pictures include the Eiffel Tower made to look like a toy over the Paris, the jaw-dropping vista of Machu Picchu in Peru made tiny and while not technically a wonder the fun image of a dreamy landscape invaded by hot-air balloons has been included.

By using a photo-processing method called tilt-shift, New York photographer Richard Silver, 51, spent £20,000 over seven-years to create the eye-popping visual feast from across the planet.

 
Made you look! Teotihuacan in Mexico appears tiny. The result can be achieved through a blurred focus and photographing a subject from a high angle 
Made you look! Teotihuacan in Mexico appears tiny. The result can be achieved through a blurred focus and photographing a subject from a high angle

 

 
The famous Brooklyn Bridge in New York is dwarfed in this imaginative photo 
The famous Brooklyn Bridge in New York is dwarfed in this imaginative photo. By simulating a shallow field of depth, subjects can appear smaller than they are

 

 
Some of the Monolithic Maoi statues of Easter Island reach 7m tall and have entranced the world for centuries - but they look positively miniscule in this image 
Some of the Monolithic Maoi statues of Easter Island reach 7m tall and have entranced the world for centuries – but they look positively miniscule in this image

 

 
The Acropolis in Athens has theatres, temples, sanctuarys and odeons - but in this picture it looks like it would struggle to hold a hundred visitors 
The Acropolis in Athens has theatres, temples, sanctuarys and odeons – but in this picture it looks like it would struggle to hold a hundred visitors
 

‘In this picture-series you are traveling the world with me,’ said Richard.

‘Since 2006 everywhere I have travelled I take a few photos that will be tilt shift-ed and added to my portfolio.

‘What I am trying to accomplish is to shrink-fit the world, one city at a time.

The globe-trotting snapper’s master-plan is to one-day photograph every city on the planet using his quirky technique for making the epic become miniature.

For Richard it’s the reaction of people who view his work that makes it all worthwhile.

Toy town! The 15th century Inca site of Machu Picchu in Peru covers13-square metres and is built 7,970ft above sea level 
Toy town! The 15th century Inca site of Machu Picchu in Peru covers13-square meters and is built 7,970ft above sea level
 
 
It may be the largest amphitheatre in the world, but the Colosseum in Rome looks a fraction of its true size 
It was largest amphitheatre of the Roman Empire, and is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and engineering. It may be the largest amphitheatre in the world, but the Colosseum in Rome looks a fraction of its true size

 

 
The Eiffel Tower in Paris looks like a toy in comparison to the 320m-tall structure - that is the same height as an 81-storey tower 
The Eiffel Tower in Paris looks like a toy in comparison to the 320m-tall structure – that is the same height as an 81-storey tower

 

 
The Great Wall of China may measure 13,170.69 miles and snake across the huge sub-continent, 
The Great Wall of China may measure 13,170.69 miles and snake across the huge sub-continent, but this picture makes it look so small that it could be crossed in a day

 

 
The Hagia Sophia, Istanbul may be 82m long and 55m high, but it appears minute in this picture. 
The Hagia Sophia, Istanbul may be 82m long and 55m high, but it appears minute in this picture. The mosque and dome have entranced architects for years – but this picture makes it look as if visitors could circle it in minutes
 
 
The magnificent Houses of Parliament, which holds Big Ben and is the most central government building in the UK 
The magnificent Houses of Parliament, which holds Big Ben and is the most central government building in the UK, look like they’re part of a small-scale model – right down to the tiny cars crossing Westminster bridge

 

 
Petra, the historical and archaeological city in the southern Jordanian governorate of Ma'an is half-built, half-carved into the rock,  
Petra, the historical and archaeological city in the southern Jordanian governorate of Ma’an is half-built, half-carved into the rock, and is surrounded by mountains riddled with passages and gorges – not that you’d know it from this picture

‘Most people are able to recognize the places that I photograph,’ he said.

‘When they recognize the location the smile that seeing my pictures brings to their faces makes all of my work worth doing.

‘Some people don’t believe me, even after I tell them that it is a real photograph with real people.

‘My favorite question is ‘is that a model or is that real?’.

‘When that is asked, I accomplished what I set out to do.’

Richard’s work is on permanent display at the LaGrange Gallery, Georgia, USA.

 
 
The colourful streets of Tokyo, Japan, are renowned for their bustling pace and towering buildings
The colorful streets of Tokyo, Japan, are renowned for their bustling pace and towering buildings – but this concrete jungle looks more like a playground in this photograph
 
Hawaii beaches are known for their stretches of sand that hug the coast
Hawaii beaches are known for their long stretches of sand that hug the coast – but during this seven-year trip the photographer – whose work is on display in Georgia – saw a different side to the sights

 

 
A bustling street in Korea looks like something out of a game - but the vehicles are actually navigating huge traffic arteries in the Asian country
A bustling street in Korea looks like something out of a game – but the vehicles are actually navigating huge traffic arteries in the Asian country

 

 
At 65m high with its distinctive blue paint, London's Tower Bridge is one of the most well-known sights in the capital
At 65m (213 ft) high with its distinctive blue paint, London’s Tower Bridge is one of the most well-known sights in the capital – but Richard Silver turns the tables on a well-known sight once again

 
The Mykonos Windmills are an iconic feature of the Greek island of the Mykonos

The Mykonos Windmills are an iconic feature of the Greek island of the Mykonos. From as early as the 16th century one of the most recognized landmarks on the island, which is one of the Cyclades islands
 
Attribution: Anna Edwards, Mail Online

Lizard Family Portrait

Baby Chinese water dragons line up for their family portraits

 

These lizards may be young but they already  know how to strike a pose.

The Chinese water dragons stayed incredibly  still for the family portrait, showing off their beautiful bright green skin.

The six-month-old babies even showed off  their playful sides by climbing up to sit on their parents’ heads.

Five of the six-month-olds cuddled up for the camera but it wasn't long before they wanted something a little higher
Five of the six-month-olds cuddled up for the camera but  it wasn’t long before they wanted something a little higher
The six Chinese water dragon siblings posed together for this family photograph
The six Chinese water dragon siblings posed together for  this family photograph

 

The father's red neck was on show as the youngsters clambered over his head
The father’s red neck was on show as the youngsters  clambered over his head

In one picture the father of the group  proudly reveals his vibrant red neck while three of his babies use him as a  bench.

The mother’s neck is a lighter pink and she  sits calmly with two of the youngsters atop her head.

The breed is known for liking heights and  climbing tree branches – so it’s no wonder they clambered over their  parents.

Jordan Cadiot, 17, who owns the reptiles,  took the pictures at his home in north-west France.

He said: ‘I originally saw a set of pictures of different reptiles and decided to stage my own photo shoot with a white  background.

‘I was delighted with the results as the  clear background allows you to really see the colour of the lizards.

‘The photos were taken at home, the  luminosity is very good when the sun is shining there.’

The father is 75cms long, while the mother is  slightly shorter at 65cms.

 

Mum stayed calm while two of her babies climbed up her body to sit on her head
Mum stayed calm while two of her babies climbed up her body to sit on her head
Pile on! The breed loves to climb wherever possible, even if it's only a few centimetres above the floor
Pile on! The breed loves to climb wherever possible,  even if it’s only a few centimetres above the floor

Mr Cadiot added: ‘The younger ones were  playing when they climbed on the adult’s head – they prefer being up  high.

‘I like showing how nature is beautiful and  interesting.

‘It was great that I got to spend even more  time with my animals, I love to watch them play and act natural.’

Attribution: Helen Lawson, Mail Online

Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 Competition

An alert young fox stalks his way through  long summer grass, bathed in the glow of a balmy evening.

A poppy field in full bloom, reminiscent of  Monet’s painting of the same name, and a fluorescent maple leaf, perfectly  framed against a foggy woodland backdrop.

All of these stunning images made it through  to the final round of the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition,  organised by the Society of German Nature Photographers (GDT).

But this image of a red fox by Hermann Hirsch  was deemed the quintessential portrait of wildlife, and won best overall image  in all categories.

An alert young fox stalks his way through long summer grass, bathed in the glow of a balmy evening, in this image by Hermann Hirsch. It won best image in the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition
An alert young fox stalks his way through long summer  grass, bathed in the glow of a balmy evening, in this image by Hermann Hirsch.  It won best image in the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013  competition

 

An adult fox prowls through the misty woodland in Fox in cloudy forest, by Klaus Echle. Dozens of images made it through to the final round of the contest
An adult fox prowls through the misty woodland in Fox in  cloudy forest, by Klaus Echle. Dozens of images made it through to the final  round of the contest

 

 

Pictures were submitted in the mammals, other animals, plants and fungi, landscapes, nature's studio, and this year's special category, animal portraits
Pictures were submitted in the mammals, other animals,  plants and fungi, landscapes, nature’s studio, and this year’s special category,  animal portraits. This rodent anxiously making its way across a forest floor,  pictured in ‘When Night Falls’ by Christoph Kaula, won third place in the  mammals category

Eighteen-year-old Hermann, is a member of the  GDT Group of Young Photographers, and is the youngest person to win the  competition.

Hermann’s image ‘Evening Idyll’ came out on  top in a field of 226 GDT members from nine countries, with  subjects as diverse as wildlife, fungus, fungus and paint.

Landscapes category runner-up: 'Landscapes in Bloom' by Sandra Bartocha. In total 3,577 images were submitted into the competition, which is run exclusively for the Society's members

Landscapes category runner-up: ‘Landscapes in Bloom’ by  Sandra Bartocha. In total 3,577 images were submitted into the competition,  which is run exclusively for the Society’s members. It is reminiscent of Monet’s  Poppy Field

 

Landscapes category third place: 'Piano Grande' by Heinz Buls. Every year the GDT organizes the International Nature Photography Festival with slide shows by photographers from all over the world
Landscapes category third place: ‘Piano Grande’ by Heinz  Buls.  Every year the GDT organizes the International Nature Photography  Festival with slide shows by photographers from all over the world
Animals portraits category winner: 'Capercaillie' by Klaus Echle.
Animals portraits category winner: ‘Capercaillie’ by  Klaus Echle. An exhibition of the photographs entered in the competition will  run from May 23 until September at the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation  (BfN) in Bonn

 

Animals portraits category runner-up: 'Young Lion' by Carsten Ott
Animals portraits category runner-up: ‘Young Lion’ by  Carsten Ott

In total 3,577 images were submitted into the  competition, which is run exclusively for the Society’s members.

Every year the GDT organizes the  International Nature Photography Festival  with slide shows by  photographers from all over the world, with photo exhibitions and  seminars on  latest subjects of the nature photography.

A penguin colony makes its way back across a sea sprayed landscape, in Returning from the hunt, by Michael Lohmann. The image won Birds category runner-up and prize of the jury
A penguin colony makes its way back across a sea sprayed  landscape, in Returning from the hunt, by Michael Lohmann. The image won Birds  category runner-up and prize of the jury

 

This icy tableau won Birds category winner: 'A Frosty Resting Place' by Bernd Nill
This icy tableau won Birds category winner: ‘A Frosty  Resting Place’ by Bernd Nill

 

Dozens of images made it through to the final round of the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition
Dozens of images made it through to the final round of  the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition

These images were submitted in the internal  photo contest, with categories including  mammals,  other animals, plants and fungi, landscapes, nature’s studio, and this  year’s special category, animal portraits.

An exhibition of the photographs  entered in  the competition will run from May 23 until September at the  Federal Agency for  Nature Conservation (BfN) in Bonn.

A spider is given an eerie makeover in this image 'Spotlight' by Klaus Tamm. It was named winner in the 'other animals category'
A spider is given an eerie makeover in this image  ‘Spotlight’ by Klaus Tamm. It was named winner in the ‘other animals  category’

 

Plants and fungi category runner-up: 'Maple leaves in Fog Forest' by Joachim Wimmer.
Plants and fungi category runner-up: ‘Maple leaves in  Fog Forest’ by Joachim Wimmer.

Attribution: Amanda Williams, Mail Online

Amazing Yosemite Photographs

Photographer captures spectacular moment lightning bolt clashes with a rainbow at Yosemite

This is the spectacular moment a photographer struck gold by capturing a bolt of lightning cracking through a rainbow during a freak weather display.

The extraordinary one-of-a-kind sighting was captured by keen photographer Nolan Nitschke, 27, while on a trip to Yosemite National Park in California, U.S.

Mr Nitschke knew a storm was approaching the area and that the incredible rocky peaks throughout the park act as lightning rods. However, he had no idea he would capture such a breathtaking moment.

Magical: This is the dramatic moment a photographer captured a bolt of lightning cracking through a rainbow in a freak weather display
This is the dramatic moment a photographer captured a bolt of lightning cracking through a rainbow in a freak weather display

 

Extraordinary: The one-of-a-kind sighting was captured by keen photographer Nolan Nitschke, 27, while on a trip to Yosemite National Park in California, U.S
 The one-of-a-kind sighting was captured by keen photographer Nolan Nitschke, 27, while on a trip to Yosemite National Park in California, U.S

 

Beautiful: To get his impressive picture, Nolan knew a storm was approaching the area and that the rocky peaks act as lightning rods. This is another of his impressive images of the national park
 To get his impressive picture, Nolan knew a storm was approaching the area and that the rocky peaks act as lightning rods. This is another of his impressive images of the national park

After spending hours painstakingly trying for the perfect shot he finally hit the jackpot as the bright lightning crashed through the colorful rainbow lighting up the dark sky.

Mr Nitschke, from Bishop in California, said: ‘I was determined to capture a lightning bolt with Half Dome in the background and knowing a storm was getting close I set out to capture it.

‘I was there trying to accomplish this goal which wasn’t a given but little did I know I would get it on my first real visit for this purpose – albeit after a few hours missing out.

‘The thunderstorm rolled into Yosemite and the Sierra Nevada. Yosemite and its granite cliffs, domes, and spires are famous for becoming lightning rods during these types of storms.

Impressive: This wide shot of the rocky surroundings of the national park show how attractive the area is

This wide shot of the rocky surroundings of the national park show how attractive the area is

Keen: The photographer spent hours painstakingly trying for the perfect shot of the lightning bolt through the rainbow. This is another of his impressive photographs
 The photographer spent hours painstakingly trying for the perfect shot of the lightning bolt through the rainbow. This is another of his impressive photographs

 

Glorious: Mr Nitschke also managed to capture this stunning rainbow during his time at Yosemite National Park
 Mr Nitschke also managed to capture this stunning rainbow during his time at Yosemite National Park

‘I had seen lightning, rainbows and storms before but never all together at once and especially not in one of the most beautiful places in the world.’

Mr Nitschke tried  unsuccessfully for hours to capture a lightning bolt, missing numerous ones that would flash after the shutter would close or before it would open.

‘A split second after I opened the shutter I saw the flash and my heart nearly stopped’, he added.

 Yosemite
A stunning rainbow at a waterfall in Yosemite
 The Californian photographer also captured this stunning rainbow at a waterfall in Yosemite, right, as well as this image of an icy lake at the foot of some mountains

 

Spectacular: With its granite cliffs, domes, and spires, Yosemite is famous for becoming lightning rods during storms
 With its granite cliffs, domes, and spires, Yosemite is famous for becoming lightning rods during storms

 

Detailed: This impressive picture taken by the 27-year-old shows a fast-flowing river in Yosemite
 This impressive picture taken by the 27-year-old shows a fast-flowing river in Yosemite

‘I knew instantly that it was dead centre in the composition and that a partial rainbow had begun forming.

‘At first I couldn’t breathe, talk, or move. A second later, after the reality of what I had captured settled in I yelled with excitement and lot of expletives.

‘It was an incredible moment and I’m just glad I decided that day to pick up my camera and give it a go because I don’t know if I will ever get the chance again.’

 

Attribution:  Anthony Bond , Mail Online

Web sleuths scour through thousands of Boston Marathon blast pictures

 Identify FIVE people they think the FBI should be talking to

from: the UK Daily Mail

 

Web users have turned into detectives in the  wake of the Boston Marathon tragedy, looking through hundreds of photos to find  the person or group behind Monday’s carnage.

As authorities conduct an exhaustive  investigation of the moments leading up to the double bombing near the finish  line, Reddit and 4chan users are doing one of their own – pointing out people at  the site of the first bombing whom they think the FBI should be talking  to.

There is, however, no official evidence to  support that the individuals pictured had anything to do with the devastating  twin bombing, which claimed three lives and injured 183 others. The claims are merely speculation, and not considered  viable evidence in the Boston and federal investigation.

Meanwhile, CNN reported that a suspect has  been identified by police after two pieces of video evidence at the scene of the  second blast were handed in to authorities.

Another look: The redditors and 4chan users claim that the bags in this photo are sporting unusual bulges, and appear to be sagging under the weight of what's inside
The redditors and 4chan users claim that  the bags in this photo are sporting unusual bulges, and appear to be sagging  under the weight of what’s inside
Questions: The users also claim that the man in the white hat does not appear to have his backpack on in another photo
The users also claim that the man in the  white hat does not appear to have his backpack on in another photo
Photo: One person's composite image compares the shape of a bulge in a bag to the shape of a pressure cooker
 One person’s composite image compares the shape  of a bulge in a bag to the shape of a pressure cooker

However, it is hard to see how the men  identified by the Reddit users fit the description of the suspect leaked to  other media outlets.

CNN’s John King said sources told him it was  a ‘dark-skinned man’ and CBS reported that it was a white man who was wearing a  black jacket, a gray hooded sweatshirt and a white or off-white baseball cap  backwards. He is said to be six feet or 6-feet-2-inches tall with a medium  build.

Investigators have not named any suspects in  the bombing, but have revealed that two pressure cooker bombs were stuffed  inside black vinyl backpacks or duffel bags when they went off.

Using that information and numerous photos –  mainly from the site of the first blast – users have pointed out several people  either wearing black backpacks or otherwise individuals who could be thought to  be acting strangely before the explosions.

The people are circled and their movements  are documented by comparing several photographs in a subreddit called  ‘FINDBOSTONBOMBERS.’

The person who started the subreddit, who  goes by the moniker Oops777, has been identified as a 23-year-old professional  poker player who lives in Boston, according to reports.

The FBI’s Boston office did not return a call  from MailOnline for comment.

A man with a white baseball cap . As  one  redditor notes, ‘The first picture shows a clear bulge from the bag, very  consistent with the type of pressure cooker believed to have been  used.’

Could this be the bombing suspect?
Could this be the bombing suspect?
Is this the suspect? People on Reddit have claimed that  while everyone around him seems to instinctively cower, this man appears to  sprint away in the opposite direction to everyone else caught in the  blast
Another look: Two men donning similar black coats, khaki pants and backpacks were also pictured, but they could also be undercover police officers
Two men donning similar black coats, khaki  pants and backpacks were also pictured, but they could also be undercover police  officers
Bird's eye view: It's possible that this man is an undercover police officer, but redditors claim that he may be involved
It’s possible that this man is an  undercover police officer, but redditors claim that he may be involved

The redditors and 4chan users claim that the  bags are sporting unusual bulges, and appear to be sagging under the weight of  what’s inside.

The users are also quick to claim that the  man in the white hat does not appear to be wearing the backpack in another  photo.

Two men donning similar black coats,  khaki  pants and backpacks were also pictured, but they could also be  undercover  police officers.

In another series of photos, one  internet  user marks a face the crowd two hours prior to the bombing, and then his  reaction afterward, noting that the man, wearing a white  hooded sweatshirt,  does not appear interested in the race and can be  seen walking away calmly  after the first blast.

While some posts may be perceived as  accusatory, other users are quick to  warn that just because the person is  pictured with a black bag, it  doesn’t mean they had anything to do with the  bombing.

Spotted: One user marks a face the crowd two hours prior to the bombing, and then his reaction afterward, noting that the man, wearing a white hooded sweatshirt, does not appear interested in the race
 One user marks a face the crowd two hours prior  to the bombing, and then his reaction afterward, noting that the man, wearing a  white hooded sweatshirt, does not appear interested in the race

In another photo posted on both 4chan and  Reddit, a man wearing a blue coat is pictured near the scene of the second  explosion holding a backpack –  with distinctive black and grey  straps.

Next to it is a photo of a mangled backpack  from the crime scene, with straps that bear a striking resemblance.

Another man, wearing a green hat and wearing  a black backpack, was also highlighted on Reddit as a person who could be  involved.

The Boston Marathon was a public event, and  hundreds of black backpacks were worn among the thousands of  attendees.

Hunt for clues: Another man, wearing a green hat and wearing a black backpack, was also highlighted on Reddit as a person who could be involved
 Another man, wearing a green hat and  wearing a black backpack, was also highlighted on Reddit as a person who could  be involved

But at the very least, it gives people a glimpse of the excruciating job the FBI have in scouring through  thousands of  images in a situation where anyone can look like a suspect.

Yesterday, a preliminary probe by Boston  officials revealed that they were made of two 1.6-gallon pressure cookers – one  containing shards of metal and ball bearings and the other packed with nails –  and both stuffed into black backpacks or duffel bags, according to a source  close to the probe.

The method used to make the bomb is  reminiscent of the failed attempt to bomb Times Square by Faisal Shahzad in 2010  – and other terror strikes in India, Afghanistan, Nepal and  Pakistan.

The FBI and anti-terror officials have urged  the public to turn in any photos or video footage they may have of the marathon  that may have captured a suspect or suspects before the blasts.

Descriptions: Picking out people from the crowd, the web sleuths comment on their behavior before the bombs went off
 Picking out people from the crowd, the web  sleuths comment on their behavior before the bombs went off

 

Ben Levine, who works in public relations in  an office on Boylston Street and was directly above where the first bomb  exploded, responded to that call.

In a piece he wrote for Deadspin, Mr Levine said that he was standing at his second floor office window  and  snapping pictures of the runners and crowds below when ‘a bomb went  off in my  face.’

Investigators have circulated  information  about the bombs, which involved kitchen pressure cookers  packed with  explosives, nails and other lethal shrapnel – but the FBI  says no on has  claimed responsibility.

‘Someone knows who did this,’ Richard  DesLauriers, FBI agent in charge in  Boston, said at a news conference where he  detailed the type of clues a  bomber might have left.

‘Importantly, the person who did this is  someone’s friend, neighbor, co-worker or relative.’

Accusations: In a photo posted on both 4chan and Reddit, a man wearing a blue coat is pictured with a backpack - with distinctive black and grey straps - dangling on his arm. A bag with similar straps is pictured at the scene of one of the bombings
In a photo posted on both 4chan and Reddit,  a man wearing a blue coat is pictured with a backpack – with distinctive black  and grey straps – dangling on his arm. A bag with similar straps is pictured at  the scene of one of the bombings
Claims: As the FBI scours through thousands of photos of the moments before the Boston Marathon, various Reddit and 4chan users are pointing out who they believe to be possible suspects
 As the FBI scours through thousands of photos of  the moments before the Boston Marathon, various Reddit and 4chan users are  pointing out who they believe to be possible suspects

 

Speculation: In this photo, the Redditors claim that a man can be seen dropping a suspicious object near the scene of the second explosion
 In this photo, the Redditors claim that a  man can be seen dropping a suspicious object near the scene of the second  explosion

New crime scene photographs of the remnants  of the first bomb which detonated during Monday’s Boston marathon shows that a  six-liter pressure cooker was used in at least one of the deadly charges – as  experts described the devices as military-style ‘anti-personnel’  devices.

The images – released by the Joint  Terrorist  Task Force – show the wreckage of a stainless steel pressure  cooker with an  Underwriters Laboratory safety mark and an imprint that  reads gas or electric,  with experts describing the devices as  military-style ‘anti-personnel’  devices.

Furthermore, it is being claimed the  deadly  devices used were designed to act like ‘homemade claymores’ –  powerful,  directional anti-personnel devices.

The lid of a pressure cooker was found on a  nearby rooftop and  investigators were able to pinpoint which type of cooker was  used.

Probe: Investigators comb through the post finish line area of the Boston Marathon at Boylston Street, two days after two bombs exploded just before the finish line
Investigators comb through the post finish line  area of the Boston Marathon at Boylston Street, two days after two bombs  exploded just before the finish line

One brand of pressure cooker with ‘6L’ on the  bottom is made by the Spanish company Fagor, which sells about 50,000 of the  six-liter pots in the United States every year, The New York Times  reported.

This gives investigators a real chance to  narrow down their list of suspects – which they said yesterday was ‘wide open’ – and find out who is responsible for the worst attacks on U.S. soil since  9/11.

They will use every clue, from the cooker’s  manufacturer and retailers to the types of nails used in the shrapnel, to try  and find out from where the bomb parts were purchased and by whom.

Roy Parker, a retired Bureau of Alcohol,  Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives agent who ­developed the agency’s  explosives training program, said examiners are looking at scraps of the bomb  components, bags and all other forensic evidence.

He said: ‘You’re looking for a needle in a  haystack, but the needle is there. If you look long enough, you’ll get stuck  with it. This is not an unsolvable crime.’

 

Dawn of the Teenager

The birth of the ‘teenage’ generation having a gas in 1940s America

 

Before Justin Bieber, One Direction and  Gossip Girl, the carefree teens of the early 1940s sipped milkshakes, listened  to records and went on their first dates – usually to the movies to catch a  flick.

The stunning images by photographer Nina  Leen, captured daily life of the American teenager as the country emerged from  the Great Depression and World War II was waged abroad.

The photos highlighted a Life Magazine  article published in 1944 about the  birth of the so-called ‘teenage’ generation, which was marked by its own  fashion, music and shoulder-length hairstyle.

A little help: A gaggle of teens try to push their broken down model T down the street in this image featured in Life magazine in 1944
A gaggle of teens try to push their  broken down model T down the street in this image featured in Life magazine in  1944

 

Flirting: A young women flaunts her charm while sipping a milkshake with some teenage boys
A young women flaunts her charm while sipping  a milkshake with some teenage boys

 

Gathering: If alive today, the women featured in the photographs would be between 83 and 85 years old
 If alive today, the women featured in the  photographs would be between 83 and 85 years old

One image shows a group of teens working  together to push a Ford model T down the street after it wouldn’t start. Another  shows a group of girls huddled around a record player, likely listening to Bing  Crosby, the top artist of 1944.

An adolescent boy puts his arm around his  date during a trip to the movies in one of Leen’s photos, as 1944 was a popular  year for films. Casablanca won the best picture Oscar that year.

The young women of the day emerged as a  distinctive generation between childhood and adulthood in post-Depression  America.

As the feature in Life magazine put it:  ‘There is a time in the life of every American girl when the most important  thing in the world is to be one of a crowd of other girls and to act and speak  and dress exactly as they do. This is the teen age.

Dining out: A group of teens enjoy some fruit, cake and milk in one of Leen's images from 1944
 A group of teens enjoy some fruit, cake and  milk in one of Leen’s images from 1944

 

Time Life
Time Life
 Top, women listen to a record as two  boys glance at a magazine. Bottom, a young couple gets romantic  as they take  in a movie
Fashion firsts: The so-called 'teenage' generation, which was marked by its own style, music and shoulder-length hairstyle
The so-called ‘teenage’ generation,  which was marked by its own style, music and shoulder-length hairstyle

‘Some 6,000,000 U.S. teen-age girls live in a  world all their own – a lovely, gay, enthusiastic, funny and blissful society  almost untouched by the war. It is a world of sweaters and skirts and bobby sox  and loafers, of hair worn long, of eye-glass rims painted red with nail polish,  of high school boys [not] yet gone to war.’

For the story, Leen followed around a group  of 12 teenage girls in Webster Groves, Missouri, snapping various pictures as  they hung out together, dressed alike and met up with boys at local sweet shops  and movie theaters.

If alive today, the women would be between 83  and 85 years old.

Carefree: The women of 1940s America had little to worry about while World War II was waged overseas
 The women of 1940s America had little to worry  about while World War II was waged overseas
Dawn of a new age: The young women of the day emerged as a distinctive generation between childhood and adulthood in post-Depression America
 The young women of the day emerged as  a distinctive generation between childhood and adulthood in post-Depression  America

Attribution: Thomas Durante, Daily Mail, LIFE

A Sinking Feeling

Rescuers work at the site of a road cave-in in the Fengtai district of Beijing Rescuers work at the site of a road cave-in in the Fengtai district of Beijing

, four firefighters escaped injury when their fire engine sunk into a large hole caused by a burst water main in the San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles Four firefighters escaped injury when their fire engine sunk into a large hole caused by a burst water main in the San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles

almost perfectly circular, sinkhole measuring 66 feet (20 m) wide and 100 feet (30 m) deep suddenly opened up, swallowing a three-storey building and a house in Guatemala City.Almost perfectly circular, sinkhole measuring 66 feet (20 m) wide and 100 feet (30 m) deep suddenly opened up, swallowing a three-storey building and a house in Guatemala City

An aerial photo shows a massive crater that appeared in a residential street in Schmalkalden, GermanyAn aerial photo shows a massive crater that appeared in a residential street in Schmalkalden, Germany

Rescuers look for survivors after a building collapsed into a large hole in Guangzhou, ChinaRescuers look for survivors after a building collapsed into a large hole in Guangzhou, China

huge crater opened at the construction site of the Pinheiros subway station in Sao Paulo, Brazil.Huge crater opened at the construction site of the Pinheiros subway station in Sao Paulo, Brazil

Attribution: Uk Telegraph

Volcano Lightning

A lightning volcano… Mother Nature at her most awesome

Streaks of crimson lava soar hundreds of feet  into the air as an erupting volcano puts on the most spectacular of light  shows.

But Mother Nature isn’t quite finished yet.

She throws in blinding flashes of forked  lightning, which crack the red-hot sky and show just the sort of fireworks she  has at her command.

Light show: Lightning emerges from lava erupting from the Sakurajima Volcano in the Kaghoshima area of South Japan in this picture taken by German photographer Martin Rietze
Lightning emerges from lava erupting from  the Sakurajima Volcano in the Kaghoshima area of South Japan in this picture  taken by German photographer Martin Rietze
Rare: Lightning only ever strikes a volcanic eruption during heavy 'vulcanian' or 'plinian' explosions when the amount of red lava is very low
 Lightning only ever strikes a volcanic eruption  during heavy ‘vulcanian’ or ‘plinian’ explosions when the amount of red lava is  very low

This awesome display of natural power  was  captured by German photographer Martin Rietze, who waits patiently  for days in  remote locations for exactly the right explosive moment.

Scientists can’t quite explain how the phenomenon of volcano lightning occurs. They believe  electrically-charged  particles of ash disgorged during the eruption  somehow react with the  atmosphere to create the forks of clear white  light.

Mr Rietze, 45, spends his life in the  world’s volcano hotspots – travelling from Costa Rica to Italy – to  capture  the grandeur of an erupting firestorm.

This stunning photo of volcanic  lightning  striking an erupting crater was taken last month at the  Sakurajima volcano near  the southern tip of Japan.

Waiting game: Patient Mr Rietze waited days before finally capturing the lightstorm images on February 25, 2013, at around 4.50am
Patient Mr Rietze waited days before  finally capturing the lightstorm images on February 25, 2013, at around  4.50am

‘You have very few chances to catch  lightning close to an erupting volcano because it involves being very patient and waiting for many days,’ Mr Rietze said.

‘I waited around four days for Sakurajima.  Knowing that very few people have ever experienced something so beautiful gives  a very special feeling. I will never ever forget those moments surrounded by  poisonous gas, feeling the heat of the  flowing and bubbling lava and hearing noises louder than a plane taking  off.  Sometimes your body can feel the  shockwaves and the ground is  shaking.’

He shrugs off the dangers of being so  close to molten lava. ‘It’s great fun, and so unique. I have had fewer mishaps chasing eruptions than when mountain climbing,’ he said.

Drama: Volcanoes are an opening or vent in the Earth's crust. When gas and magma builds up under the surface it eventually erupts above the surface through this gap, spewing rocks, lava and ash
 Volcanoes are an opening or vent in the Earth’s  crust. When gas and magma builds up under the surface it eventually erupts above  the surface through this gap, spewing rocks, lava and ash

 

Danger: The lava can reach 1,250C and burn everything in its path. These flows are currents of hot gas and rock that reach temperatures of 1,000C and travel up to 500mph
 The lava can reach 1,250C and burn everything in  its path. These flows are currents of hot gas and rock that reach temperatures  of 1,000C and travel up to 500mph

 

Equipment: Mr Rietze shot the magnificent photos on a highly sensitive full format DSLR with a shorter (90-200mm) but very bright tele-lens
 Mr Rietze shot the magnificent photos on a  highly sensitive full format DSLR with a shorter (90-200mm) but very bright  tele-lens

A volcano is essentially an opening or vent  in the Earth’s crust. When gas and magma – the hot fluid under the surface – build up they erupt through this gap, spewing hot rocks, ash  and lava reaching  1,200C (2,192F).

But when lightning follows, it is a  different type from that seen in thunderstorms. Dr Sue Loughlin, head of volcanology at British Geological Survey, explained volcanic lightning  is  still a natural mystery.

‘Lightning typically forms as ash  particles  are charged through friction during eruption and dispersion in the atmosphere,’ she said. ‘Ice particles in the atmosphere are also  involved. But scientists  are unclear about the exact mechanisms.’

Attribution: Nick Mcdermott, Mail Online