The Left Isn’t Done Crying about Oil Pipelines

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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Did you hear? There was an oil spill at the Dakota Access Pipeline. No doubt it has seeped into the ground and contaminated local water supplies, poisoning entire villages and Injun Reservations.

The Huffington Post, custodian of the anti-energy radical left, reports that yes indeed, the Dakota Access Pipeline leaked 84 gallons of oil. “The Dakota Access Pipeline isn’t yet operational, but it has already sprung a leak.” Oh gasp!

84 gallons seems like a lot of oil – and boy does the HuffPo want you to think that. And you may, until you realize that once the Pipeline is completed and at capacity it will be moving 470,000 barrels, or 19,740,000 gallons per day. That’s equivalent to filling 30 Olympic-sized swimming pools every day.

“On April 4, 84 gallons of crude oil escaped at a Crandon, South Dakota, pump station, Dakota Media Group first reported Wednesday,” HuffPo wrote.

Wait…what?! Dirty, nasty, nature-killing oil was spilled over a month ago and is just now being reported? This is wrong. Is this another cover-up by Big Oil?! read more

Pipeline Rupture Means No Keystone XL

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Last Saturday a section of oil pipeline ruptured in Montana releasing an estimated 50,000 gallons of oil. That’s equivalent tpipeline ruptureo about 1190 barrels.

The Bridger companies Poplar pipeline that runs through eastern Montana has been transporting oil from the Bakken shale formation since 2010.

Last weekend’s spill made headlines and the environmentalists are on the war path. The reports are that the spill in the Yellowstone River has caused an environmental disaster. Bottled water has been trucked in to surrounding communities due to “elevated volatile compounds” found in a sample taken at the Glendive Montana water treatment plant. read more

Gulf Oil Spill

Iran is considering the possibility of spilling oil in the Persian Gulf in order to contaminate the waters of the strategically important Strait of Hormuz, German weekly Der Spiegel reported on Sunday. The spill would be a way of “punishing” the West and forcing it to decrease the economic sanctions imposed against Tehran.

Citing Western intelligence sources, Der Spiegel reported that the plan, codenamed “Murky Waters,” is meant to block international oil tanker shipping routes in the Gulf.

In addition to driving up oil prices, the resulting environmental disaster would force Western countries to start a large-scale cleanup operation in cooperation with Iran, which could reduce the sanctions currently placed on the country.

According to the report, the plan was developed by the commander of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari, and Navy Commander Rear Admiral Ali Fadavi.

Der Spiegel reported that the decision on whether or to implement the plan was now in the hands of Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

In an additional attempt to ease the sanctions imposed on it by the West, Tehran said it would seek to cut imports of non-essential goods and urged its citizens to reduce their use of foreign-made mobile telephones and cars.

The policies suggest the government is moving the economy onto an austerity footing to resist the sanctions, which have been imposed over Iran’s controversial nuclear program and have slashed its income from oil exports this year.

Authorities have divided imports into 10 categories based on how essential they are, and will provide importers with dollars at a subsidized rate to buy basic goods, Deputy Industry Minister Hamid Safdel was quoted as saying on Sunday.

Meanwhile, importers of goods in two non-essential categories will have to obtain dollars at much more expensive rates on the open market, the Iranian Students’ News Agency (ISNA) reported him as saying.

Goods in these two categories include cigarette papers, wallpaper, mobile phones, luggage, clothing and cars, ISNA reported. It said about $10 to $12 billion was spent annually on importing luxury and non-essential goods into Iran.

Industry Minister Mehdi Ghazanfari urged Iranians on Saturday to limit their use of such goods and turn to domestic manufacturers to help the government cope with sanctions.

“If we move towards reducing the import of goods in these categories, which are not so necessary, we can save foreign exchange,” Ghazanfari said, according to the Mehr news agency. “If people do not use these goods, the need for currency for them would drop to zero.”

Attribution: Jerusalem Post, Reuters