Both Trump and Christie are Big on Protectionism

by: the Common Constitutionalist

When Chris Christie first exited the Republican presidential primary, I figured he would then throw his endorsement to one the establishment candidates left in the race. But then he threw his weight (pun intended) behind Donald Trump.

Other than both portraying themselves as tough talking, gravy-stained champions of the blue collar set, they didn’t appear to have a lot in common. Well, I found one thing both Chrispie Creme and The Donald share a desire for – and that is protectionism.

Protectionism is one of Trump’s major platform items. He of course will never describe it as such, but he’s been telling us for months how he will make great trade deals with China, Vietnam, Japan and Mexico. A large component of these “great deals” is tariffs slapped on these countries in an effort to drive up import prices thereby making American made products more competitive.

That my friends (hat tip – John McCain) is protectionism. It’s the government manipulating the free market (as if there is such a thing) in order to artificially pick winners and losers.

What actually happens is that companies which are then “protected” from less costly competition are free to raise prices. In effect the government just creates a monopolistic economy where the end user, the consumer, always loses in the end. read more

Black Teen Sends Texts To Himself

A black high school student in New Jersey who claimed he received racist text messages demanding him to drop out of a student government election sent the messages to himself, a school official confirmed to TheBlaze Tuesday.

“The police have confirmed the student had sent the text messages to himself,” Saint Peter’s Prep vice principal James Horan told TheBlaze Tuesday morning.

Saint Peter's Prep

Horan said in a statement the school is happy to finally put the issue behind them, and “now considers the case closed.”

“The entire Saint Peter’s Prep community is relieved that this extremely distressing incident has found closure, and we commend the various law enforcement officials for their diligent work on this case over the past months,” Horan said.

The unidentified 16-year-old was running for president of the school’s student government in May when he complained to school officials, and later police, that he had received several racist texts, according to NJ.com.

“We have NEVER and will NEVER have an (n-word) to lead our school,” one reportedly said.

Another supposedly called him a “slave” and said “COMEONE your [sic] black!!! lol your [sic] a joke for even trying to run.”

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Gov. Christie Appoints Islamist-Friendly AG

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, a likely Republican presidential candidate, has appointed Attorney General Jeffrey Chiesa to the Senate following the death of Senator Frank Lautenberg. Chiesa, who will serveJeffrey Chiesa until a new candidate is elected, has led the Christie Administration’s outreach to Islamist radicals.

In November 2012, the Clarion Project broke the story that four Islamists belong to Attorney General Chiesa’s Muslim outreach committee. One member, Imam Mohammad Qatanani, has a long relationship with Governor Christie.

The Department of Homeland Security has been trying to deport Qatanani because of his Hamas links since July 2006. His green card application left out a 1993 conviction in Israel for his involvement with the terrorist group. Shortly after his release, he moved to N.J. to lead the Hamas-founded Islamic Center of Passaic County, alongside a later-convicted Hamas fundraiser. The DHS took note of Qatanani’s cash transfers to the West Bank.

A 2008 court filing by the Department of Homeland Security summarized: “It is certainly suspicious when a person who has been convicted of being a member of, and providing services, to Hamas, who has personal ties to a Hamas militant leader, and a Hamas fundraiser also sends undisclosed cash to the West Bank.”

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Christie, Facing Re-election, Attacks NRA Ad

There he goes again.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Thursday became the most prominent Republican to criticize the National Rifle Association — calling its advertisement referencing President Barack Obama’s daughters “reprehensible.”

“I think any of us who are public figures, you see that kind of ad and you cringe,” Christie said at a news conference where he introduced a task force on guns and mental health.

Christie, facing re-election this year in heavily Democratic blue state New Jersey, appears to have made beating up on fellow Republicans and their supporters a central theme
of his campaign.

The NRA’s ad called Obama an “elitist hypocrite” for not supporting armed guards at schools, even though his daughters receive armed protection at school.

Obama’s children attend the Sidwell school, an elite private academy in Washington, DC. The school has approximately a dozen armed security guards. Continue Reading

Storm Damage

Almost one week after superstorm Sandy struck the East Coast with its ferocious force, power was still out to some 2.5 million customers due to  damages, down from 3.5 million on Friday, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office  of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability claimed.

Tthe state with the largest number of outages by far is still New Jersey with 32 percent of customers without power, it said it a report.

And as the lights begin to flicker on in Lower Manhattan, nine percent of customers across the state of New York still do not have power, followed by seven percent in Connecticut.

Artist Konstantin Bokov gets water to boil for drinking from an old fire hrydrant at Rockaway Beach, New York on November 3, 2012. He has no power, and no running waterArtist Konstantin Bokov gets water to boil for drinking  from an old fire hrydrant at Rockaway Beach, New York on November 3, 2012. He  has no power, and no running water
What remains: Julie Traina tries to recover some personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in Staten Island yesterdayJulie Traina tries to recover some  personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in Staten Island
Vigilante justice: A sign is seen outside a home in Long Beach in Long Island on November 2 gives a dire warning to would-be looters  A sign is seen outside a home in Long Beach in Long Island on November 2 gives a dire warning to would-be looters
Under protection: A warning message seen written on a door to keep away looters in a street in Freeport, Long Island as they try to return to normalcy following the hurricane A warning message seen written on a  door to keep away looters in a street in Freeport, Long Island as they try to return to normalcy following the hurricane
Wild west: People walk through the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood in Queens where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away People walk through the heavily damaged  Rockaway neighborhood in Queens where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away
The hunger games: Two women look into the window of a flooded deli while searching for food in Coney Island, four days after SandyTwo women look into the window of a  flooded deli while searching for food in Coney Island, four days after Sandy
Aid: A boy watches as members of the U.S. Army National Guard unload food and supplies in the Rockaways section of Queens  A boy watches as members of the U.S. Army National Guard unload food and supplies in the Rockaways section of Queens

This comes as residents of the Rockaways in Queens continued to struggle without power, heat or food for a sixth day as their neighborhood slowly descended into chaos.

‘It’s chaos; it’s pandemonium out here,’ said Chris Damon, who had been waiting for 3.5 hours at the site and had circled the block five times. “It seems like nobody has any answers.”

Added Damon: ‘I feel like a victim of Hurricane Katrina. I never thought it could happen here in New York, but it’s happened.’

With little police presence on the storm-ravaged streets, many residents of the peninsula have been forced to take their protection into their own hands, arming themselves with guns, baseball bats and even bows and arrows to ward off thugs seeking to loot their  homes.

It has been reported that crooks have been disguising themselves as Long Island Power Authority workers and coming by homes on the peninsula in the middle of the night while real utility workers were nowhere to be found.

‘We booby-trapped our door and keep a baseball bat beside our bed,’ Danielle Harris, 34, told the New York Daily News.

The woman added that she has been hearing gunshots likely fired in the nearby housing project for three nights in a row.

Meanwhile, local surfer Keone Singlehurst said that he stockpiled knives, a machete and a bow and arrow.

‘I would take a looter with a bow if a felt threatened I would definitely use it,’ he said. ‘It’s like the wild west. A borderline lawless situation.’

City Councilman James Sanders said he fears that things are going to get even worse.

‘We have an explosive mix here,’ he said.  ‘People will take matters into their own hands.’

Sanders has directed much of his anger and frustration at LIPA, calling on the City Council to investigate the utility for ignoring the Rockaways for so long.

‘LIPA has failed the people of the Rockaways,’ he said. ‘It’s a question of class… serving the richer areas of Long Island and ignoring the Rockaways.’

Barbecue: Collins Wimbish cooks food over a fire in a barrel in the Rockaways neighborhood of Queens Collins Wimbish cooks food over a fire in a  barrel in the Rockaways neighborhood of Queens
Keeping in touch: People charge cell phones at a police generator in RockawaysPeople charge cell phones at a police generator in Rockaways
Destroyed: This Rockaways boardwalk that was pushed off of its pilings by storm surge This Rockaways boardwalk that was pushed off  of its pilings by storm surge
Making do: Large areas of New York outside Manhattan are still without power or functioning stores to buy food and water following Hurricane Sandy Large areas of New York outside Manhattan are still without power or functioning stores to buy food and water following  Hurricane Sandy
Ruins: A silhouetted man walks past a strip of destroyed buildings in Rockaways  A silhouetted man walks past a strip of destroyed  buildings in Rockaways
Reception: A man makes a phone call next to discarded storm garbage in Coney Island FridayA man makes a phone call next to discarded storm garbage in Coney Island Friday

Walter Meyer, 37, told the Daily News that the Rockaways of today bears little resemblance to the peaceful place where he has surfed so many times in the past.

Shooting looters: A toy dog wearing a military helmet sits atop a car holding a sing warning off looters in a resident's driveway in the Rockaways A toy dog wearing a military helmet sits atop a car holding a sing warning off looters in a resident’s driveway in the Rockaways

‘After sunset everyone locks their doors,’ he  said. ‘They’re trying to find whatever weapons they can find. Some people are even using bows and arrows.’

Along with mounting safety concerns,  homeowners in the beachfront community hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, that have left 109 dead, continued to face hunger, complaining that federal officials have left them to fend for themselves.

‘Rockaways always get left over,’ said Meyer. ‘It’s treated like a marginalized land in the city.’

Most of the grocery stores in the area have not reopened since the storm, and the neighborhood has been left cut off from the rest of the city, with no trains or even shuttle buses servicing the residents.

Stranded neighbors largely have been relying on volunteers delivering food, water and other basic necessities while the Red Cross and FEMA were still nowhere in sight.

‘We can’t exist,’ said Ann Manning. ‘We can’t buy milk. We can’t buy cereal. We can’t buy nothing.’

As they scrape around desperately for food and are forced to use their gas to keep warm, many claim they are the forgotten victims of Sandy.

The Borough President of Staten Island called the reaction of Red Cross –  or lack thereof – to the devastation caused by Sandy an ‘absolute  disgrace’.

Destruction: Marina Sverdlov talks to a real estate broker while standing in her flood ravaged home in Staten Island Marina Sverdlov talks to a real estate  broker while standing in her flood ravaged home in Staten Island
No safe harbor: Boats pushed up by Hurricane Sandy lie against residences next to a marina on in Staten Island as a man walks his dogBoats pushed up by Hurricane Sandy lie against residences next to a marina on Staten Island as a man walks his  dog
Bitter: A sign about the marathon and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is displayed in a devastated section of Staten Island yesterday, before the marathon was canceled  A sign about the marathon and New York City  Mayor Michael Bloomberg is displayed in a devastated section of Staten Island, before the marathon was canceled
Relief: People eat soup at a donation and distribution center in the Rockaways, though residents are complaining there is not enough assistance for them People eat soup at a donation and distribution  center in the Rockaways, though residents are complaining there is not enough assistance for them
Survival: Emilio Langilotti of Staten Island carries food from a FEMA and American Red Cross aid and disaster relief station in the boroughEmilio Langilotti of Staten Island carries food from a FEMA and American Red Cross aid and disaster relief station in the borough

James Molinaro went as far as to tell people not to donate to the charity because when push came to shove, the group just didn’t deliver when Staten Island needed them the most.

He’s remained there ever since the hurricane struck and gave his first-hand account of the devastation.

‘It’s so bad here, a lot worse than how its being portrayed by the media.,’  he said.

‘They are finding bodies left and right, elderly people who don’t even watch the news or who knew the storm was coming. I was just with one of my best friends from high school and college, and his house is completely gone.

‘I know this island in and out. To see it completely destroyed is bizarre.

‘I’ve been trying to hit every shelter on Staten Island to do what I can,  just to make people smile. A lot of people know me and know I’m from here.’

‘My advice to the people of Staten Island is  do not donate to the American Red Cross,’ said Mr Molinaro. ‘Let them get their  money elsewhere.’

‘It’s an absolute disgrace in a county that has always responded to disasters all over the world,’ he said.

‘Katrina – we sent them down four trailer loads of food, water and one trailer load of generators. No one’s responding to us.’

Residents are pleading for help as they fear their devastated neighborhoods are being ignored.

In a Coney Island apartment block, where tenants huddle together in one room and human waste spills out of the toilet, tenant Jeffery Francis despairs that help is not getting to Brooklyn faster.

‘We are scavenging for food like animals,’ he  told the New York Daily News. ‘We are in a crisis and no one will help us. Look at us. We are misery. Everyone cares about Manhattan. No one is looking out for us. Nothing.’

At another apartment where power is still out, residents are out of food and praying for help. Albert Miller, 58, told the paper: ‘One person found a sandwich and we split it four ways.’

While power was likely returned to Manhattan’s East and West Villages, Financial District, Chelsea, Chinatown and the Lower East Side by the weekend, according to the power company, Con Edison, outages in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island are not expected to be repaired for another week.

Across Staten Island residents are also increasingly frustrated they are being passed over while other parts of  New York and New Jersey receive aid and attention.

Residents were furious the island was being prepared as the starting line for Sunday’s marathon, while hundreds are left hungry and one resident there told CBS station WCBS, ‘We’re gonna die! We’re gonna freeze! We’ve got 90-year-old people without homes in the wake of the superstorm!’

Natvel Pritchard, of Staten Island, told CBS  News, ‘Though people don’t talk about Staten Island much, people are here, a lot of people are hurting, so it’s upsetting.’

Crossings: Alexandra Lopez, 7, looks out the window of the Staten Island Ferry on November 2Alexandra Lopez, 7, looks out the window of  the Staten Island Ferry on November 2
Two worlds: The half of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge attached to Brooklyn is lit while the half attached to Staten Island is dark last night The half of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge  attached to Brooklyn is lit while the half attached to Staten Island is dark last night

Homes across Brooklyn and Coney Island are some of the worst hit in the wake of the superstorm.

Many houses shattered into piles of bricks and splintered planks at Coney Island, while others stand waterlogged and abandoned.

What's left: Mounds of debris can be seen in the massively damaged Rockaway neighborhoodMounds of debris can be seen in the massively damaged Rockaway neighborhood
Damages: Jeff Kulikowski sits on a bench on the boardwalk that was pushed off of its pilings by storm surge in the RockawaysJeff Kulikowski sits on a bench on the boardwalk that was pushed off of its pilings by storm surge in the Rockaways

One gated community at the tip of the island, Seagate, was particularly badly hit, with some houses entirely washed away or flattened.

For power companies, the scale of destruction was unmatched – more widespread than any blizzard or ice storm and worse than the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

‘It’s unprecedented: fallen trees, debris, the roads, water, snow. It’s a little bit of everything,’ said Brian Wolff, senior vice president of the Edison Electric Institute, a group that lobbies for utilities.

Initially, about 60 million people were without power in 8.2 million homes and businesses.

By Wednesday night, that number had fallen to roughly 44 million people in 6 million households and businesses and today around 3.6 million are without power.

Stacked: Boats piled up on top of one another near Beach Haven Inlet on the New Jersey coastline. Residents outside of New York City believe they are being passed over while aid is directed to ManhattanBoats piled up on top of one another near Beach Haven Inlet on the New Jersey coastline. Residents in New York’s outer boroughs, and elsewhere outside the city, believe they are being passed over while aid is directed to Manhattan
Destruction: Homes in the Sea Gate part of Brooklyn have been ripped apart by the superstormHomes in the Seagate part of Brooklyn have been ripped apart by the superstorm
Ruin: Whole walls and roofs of homes in Sea Gate, Brooklyn, were destroyed by the stormWhole walls and roofs of homes in Seagate,  Brooklyn, were destroyed by the storm
Areas of New York and New Jersey are still without power days after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast of America
Attribution: Mail Online

Fast Commute

These pictures show possibly the fastest commute between New Jersey and New York in history as a Formula 1 car travels at 190mph and takes less than 30 seconds to travel through New York’s Lincoln Tunnel.

Motoring his 900 horse-powered vehicle under the Hudson River, former Formula 1 driver David Coulthard raced from New Jersey to Manhattan and completed a journey that would take three minutes at the legal speed limit if there was zero traffic – which is rare.

The 1.5 mile long Lincoln Tunnel, which carries 120,000 cars a day, was closed in the early hours of Wednesday morning to allow Coulthard and the British-based Red Bull Racing Formula 1 team to play out every New Yorker’s fantasy.

‘The test drive is meant to bring the world’s attention to New Jersey and New Jersey’s attention to Formula 1 racing,’ said Tony Burrows, Red Bull Racing’s Support Team Manager.

This is the second summer in succession that the Red Bull team have visited Weehawken and West New York to test out and promote the proposed track of the ‘Grand Prix of America.’

Designed as a street circuit with the Manhattan skyline as the backdrop, the race would take place in New Jersey.

David Coulthard, the winner of 13 Grand Prix’s, took the Red Bull RB7 championship-winning car through Liberty State Park, the Lincoln Tunnel and parts of the race course.

Scottish Coulthard also took a tour of the 3.1 mile course in a road car, performing ‘donuts’, which is when a driver spins around on the spot burning the rubber of their tires to create circles on the road.

‘We were wondering about the cracks and everything in the roads, but I don’t think they’re an issue,’ said Coulthard to The Jersey Journal.

‘I think people are excited to see what we can do out there.’

Filming the Lincoln Tunnel drive from the air and the ground, Red Bull are hoping to keep enthusiasm going for the Formula 1 race in a country which is known to be ambivalent to the global race-fest.

‘The Grand Prix next June is not an official race yet,’ said Leo Parente, a former Formula 1 racer covering the event for Youtube’s Drive channel.

‘Generally, Formula 1 races are not official until the beginning of the year because local business or politics may interfere with planned races.

‘Events like this are a way to build excitement for the race and keep it from being canceled.’

The ‘Grand Prix of America’ is scheduled to be raced in June of 2013 and has the backing of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie.

‘It’s incredible. This is going to be an economic boom for this whole region,’ said the outspoken politician.

The circuit of the grand prix has already been compared to the Monte Carlo Grand Prix, the world’s premier and most glamorous street circuit.

The expected New Jersey race would come over 30 years since the sport’s boss, Bernie Ecclestone’s last serious attempt to set up an event in the Garden State.

It is part of his quest to strengthen Formula One in the U.S., where its popularity comes a distant third to NASCAR and IndyCar.

But with IndyCar seemingly in decline, which started with its split from CART in 1994 and has seen dwindling viewing figures and raceday fan numbers in the past 10 years, it could be the perfect time for Formula One to expand into America and take on NASCAR.

‘There is a lot of excitement about Formula One coming to America,’ said David Coulthard.

‘Red Bull have done more than anyone to promote the fact that we’re going to have not one, but two grands prix in the States.

‘This is a big enough country, a sophisticated audience that gets the technology of Formula One and at the moment, we are delivering good racing.’

The area is not foreign to motorsports, though it has been for a while.

The Meadowlands Grand Prix was a CART IndyCar race held in East Rutherford from 1984-1991.

It was the first major race in the New York City metropolitan area since 1937, and the course twisted and turned around the original Giants Stadium.

And to celebrate the fact that Red Bull are heavily promoting the ‘Grand Prix of America’, their engineering wizards got their car to perform the Star Spangled Banner.

Using computers to rev the engine in time to the U.S. national anthem, the Red Bull team’s car performed a seamless rendition.

Attribution: Mail Online