Lizard Family Portrait

Baby Chinese water dragons line up for their family portraits

 

These lizards may be young but they already  know how to strike a pose.

The Chinese water dragons stayed incredibly  still for the family portrait, showing off their beautiful bright green skin.

The six-month-old babies even showed off  their playful sides by climbing up to sit on their parents’ heads.

Five of the six-month-olds cuddled up for the camera but it wasn't long before they wanted something a little higher
Five of the six-month-olds cuddled up for the camera but  it wasn’t long before they wanted something a little higher
The six Chinese water dragon siblings posed together for this family photograph
The six Chinese water dragon siblings posed together for  this family photograph

 

The father's red neck was on show as the youngsters clambered over his head
The father’s red neck was on show as the youngsters  clambered over his head

In one picture the father of the group  proudly reveals his vibrant red neck while three of his babies use him as a  bench.

The mother’s neck is a lighter pink and she  sits calmly with two of the youngsters atop her head.

The breed is known for liking heights and  climbing tree branches – so it’s no wonder they clambered over their  parents.

Jordan Cadiot, 17, who owns the reptiles,  took the pictures at his home in north-west France.

He said: ‘I originally saw a set of pictures of different reptiles and decided to stage my own photo shoot with a white  background.

‘I was delighted with the results as the  clear background allows you to really see the colour of the lizards.

‘The photos were taken at home, the  luminosity is very good when the sun is shining there.’

The father is 75cms long, while the mother is  slightly shorter at 65cms.

 

Mum stayed calm while two of her babies climbed up her body to sit on her head
Mum stayed calm while two of her babies climbed up her body to sit on her head
Pile on! The breed loves to climb wherever possible, even if it's only a few centimetres above the floor
Pile on! The breed loves to climb wherever possible,  even if it’s only a few centimetres above the floor

Mr Cadiot added: ‘The younger ones were  playing when they climbed on the adult’s head – they prefer being up  high.

‘I like showing how nature is beautiful and  interesting.

‘It was great that I got to spend even more  time with my animals, I love to watch them play and act natural.’

Attribution: Helen Lawson, Mail Online

Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 Competition

An alert young fox stalks his way through  long summer grass, bathed in the glow of a balmy evening.

A poppy field in full bloom, reminiscent of  Monet’s painting of the same name, and a fluorescent maple leaf, perfectly  framed against a foggy woodland backdrop.

All of these stunning images made it through  to the final round of the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition,  organised by the Society of German Nature Photographers (GDT).

But this image of a red fox by Hermann Hirsch  was deemed the quintessential portrait of wildlife, and won best overall image  in all categories.

An alert young fox stalks his way through long summer grass, bathed in the glow of a balmy evening, in this image by Hermann Hirsch. It won best image in the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition
An alert young fox stalks his way through long summer  grass, bathed in the glow of a balmy evening, in this image by Hermann Hirsch.  It won best image in the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013  competition

 

An adult fox prowls through the misty woodland in Fox in cloudy forest, by Klaus Echle. Dozens of images made it through to the final round of the contest
An adult fox prowls through the misty woodland in Fox in  cloudy forest, by Klaus Echle. Dozens of images made it through to the final  round of the contest

 

 

Pictures were submitted in the mammals, other animals, plants and fungi, landscapes, nature's studio, and this year's special category, animal portraits
Pictures were submitted in the mammals, other animals,  plants and fungi, landscapes, nature’s studio, and this year’s special category,  animal portraits. This rodent anxiously making its way across a forest floor,  pictured in ‘When Night Falls’ by Christoph Kaula, won third place in the  mammals category

Eighteen-year-old Hermann, is a member of the  GDT Group of Young Photographers, and is the youngest person to win the  competition.

Hermann’s image ‘Evening Idyll’ came out on  top in a field of 226 GDT members from nine countries, with  subjects as diverse as wildlife, fungus, fungus and paint.

Landscapes category runner-up: 'Landscapes in Bloom' by Sandra Bartocha. In total 3,577 images were submitted into the competition, which is run exclusively for the Society's members

Landscapes category runner-up: ‘Landscapes in Bloom’ by  Sandra Bartocha. In total 3,577 images were submitted into the competition,  which is run exclusively for the Society’s members. It is reminiscent of Monet’s  Poppy Field

 

Landscapes category third place: 'Piano Grande' by Heinz Buls. Every year the GDT organizes the International Nature Photography Festival with slide shows by photographers from all over the world
Landscapes category third place: ‘Piano Grande’ by Heinz  Buls.  Every year the GDT organizes the International Nature Photography  Festival with slide shows by photographers from all over the world
Animals portraits category winner: 'Capercaillie' by Klaus Echle.
Animals portraits category winner: ‘Capercaillie’ by  Klaus Echle. An exhibition of the photographs entered in the competition will  run from May 23 until September at the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation  (BfN) in Bonn

 

Animals portraits category runner-up: 'Young Lion' by Carsten Ott
Animals portraits category runner-up: ‘Young Lion’ by  Carsten Ott

In total 3,577 images were submitted into the  competition, which is run exclusively for the Society’s members.

Every year the GDT organizes the  International Nature Photography Festival  with slide shows by  photographers from all over the world, with photo exhibitions and  seminars on  latest subjects of the nature photography.

A penguin colony makes its way back across a sea sprayed landscape, in Returning from the hunt, by Michael Lohmann. The image won Birds category runner-up and prize of the jury
A penguin colony makes its way back across a sea sprayed  landscape, in Returning from the hunt, by Michael Lohmann. The image won Birds  category runner-up and prize of the jury

 

This icy tableau won Birds category winner: 'A Frosty Resting Place' by Bernd Nill
This icy tableau won Birds category winner: ‘A Frosty  Resting Place’ by Bernd Nill

 

Dozens of images made it through to the final round of the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition
Dozens of images made it through to the final round of  the Nature Photographer of the Year 2013 competition

These images were submitted in the internal  photo contest, with categories including  mammals,  other animals, plants and fungi, landscapes, nature’s studio, and this  year’s special category, animal portraits.

An exhibition of the photographs  entered in  the competition will run from May 23 until September at the  Federal Agency for  Nature Conservation (BfN) in Bonn.

A spider is given an eerie makeover in this image 'Spotlight' by Klaus Tamm. It was named winner in the 'other animals category'
A spider is given an eerie makeover in this image  ‘Spotlight’ by Klaus Tamm. It was named winner in the ‘other animals  category’

 

Plants and fungi category runner-up: 'Maple leaves in Fog Forest' by Joachim Wimmer.
Plants and fungi category runner-up: ‘Maple leaves in  Fog Forest’ by Joachim Wimmer.

Attribution: Amanda Williams, Mail Online

Which One’s the Twig?

These weird and wonderful insects have been caught in a unique set of poses as they form bizarre shapes.

The twig-like praying mantises were snapped by professional photographer Mehmet Karaca in his hometown in Kahramanmaras, a province in Turkey.

He photographed them as they were eating  plants but also camouflaging themselves from predators at the same time.

Bend and twist: These weird and wonderful insects have been caught in a unique set of poses as they form bizarre shapesThese weird and wonderful insects have  been caught in a unique set of poses as they form bizarre shapes
These weird and wonderful insects have been caught in a unique set of poses as they form bizarre shapes
These weird and wonderful insects have been caught in a unique set of poses as they form bizarre shapes

Mr Karaca 27, said: ‘The praying mantises camouflage well with plants and really do look like flowers – sometimes I can hardly recognize them’

Caught on camera: The twig-like praying mantises were snapped by professional photographer Mehmet Karaca in his hometown in Kahramanmaras, a province in TurkeyThe twig-like praying mantises were  snapped by professional photographer Mehmet Karaca in his hometown in  Kahramanmaras, a province in Turkey

Mr Karaca, 27, said: ‘The praying mantises  camouflage well with plants and really do look like flowers – sometimes I can hardly recognize them.’

‘I have been doing photography for three years now and I used a macro lens on my camera to shoot these beauties.’

Mantises are camouflaged, and most species make use of protective coloration to blend in with the foliage.

Various species have evolved to not only blend with the foliage, but to mimic it, appearing as either living or withered  leaves, sticks, tree bark, blades of grass, flowers, or even  stones

Close-up: Mr Karaca uses a macro lens to capture the animals on camera Mr Karaca uses a macro lens to capture the  animals on camera
These weird and wonderful insects have been caught in a unique set of poses as they form bizarre shapes.
These weird and wonderful insects have been caught in a unique set of poses as they form bizarre shapes.
Various species have evolved to not only blend  with the foliage, but to mimic it, appearing as either living or withered  leaves, sticks, tree bark, blades of grass, flowers, or even stones
Can you see him? Mantises are camouflaged, and most species make use of protective coloration to blend in with the foliage Mantises are camouflaged, and most species make use of protective coloration to blend in with the foliage

Attribution: Mail Online