Trump May be Becoming the President We Conservatives Wanted

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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Not Yet – But Maybe Soon!

Despite his constant tweeting, his loud and brash exterior, is President Trump slowly becoming the President we wanted all along? He just may be.

Sure, he may never be the strict Constitutionalist that I have been pining for oh these many years. I don’t reckon another Calvin Coolidge will be rising to prominence any time soon, if ever again.

But the decisions Trump makes without having to include Congress have been impressive. His campaign platform was replete with conservative ideas. Tax cuts were his idea. He chose supreme Court justice Neil Gorsuch. Deportation of illegals was his idea, as was the construction of an actual border wall – not just lame picket fence, or a hollow promise. Unlike Congress, he actual does want to repeal ObamaCare.

Renegotiation of trade deals to be more beneficial to America is his idea. Backing out of the Paris Climate hoax was all him. Dealing more harshly with Iran and North Korea – him. Vetting of refugees, etc. The list grows larger seemingly every day. And they are all good ideas that get lost in the tone and tenor of his presentation. That, and the constant yapping of the “purse dogs” in the press.

And now he has just done something that should impress even the hardest-core federalist. read more

Predator or Prey

Hunter becomes the hunted

 

The lion may be king of the jungle, but this  herd of buffalo certainly showed him who’s boss.

The hunter became the hunted and this  scaredy-cat was forced to run for cover when buffalo he was stalking turned  round and struck back.

He was forced to swallow his pride and sprint  away into the bush of the Kruger National  Park, South Africa, after finding himself  outnumbered by the massive bovines .

 
Tail between his legs: This lion was lucky to escape with his life after he misjudged his attack on a herd of Cape buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, and they came sprinting after him with deadly force
Tail between his legs: This lion was lucky to  escape  with his life after he misjudged his attack on a herd of Cape  buffalo in the  Kruger National Park,  South Africa, and they came sprinting after him with  deadly force

African Cape buffalo can weigh up to a ton  and have powerful fused horns so strong that they have sometimes  even been  known to stop rifle bullets.

Their herds are remarkable for their lack of  hierarchy and an apparent altruism that makes them fiercely protective of calves  and weaker members.

When chased by predators the herd sticks  close together, calves gathered in the middle, to make it hard for any one  member to be picked off.

They fight off threats, as in this instance,  by forming a mob and charging at predators with superior weight and numbers.

 
A red billed oxpecker perches on the nose of a buffalo: African Cape buffalo can weigh up to a ton and have powerful fused horns so strong that they have sometimes even been known to stop rifle bullets
A red billed oxpecker perches on the nose of a  buffalo:  African Cape buffalo can weigh up to a ton and have powerful  fused horns so  strong that they have sometimes even been known to stop  rifle bulletsBuffalo have been recorded chasing lions up a  tree and keeping them there for as long as two hours.Lion cubs unlucky enough to get in the way  can get trampled and killed.This not so cunning cat was lucky  enough to  make his escape with his tail between his legs after the  tables turned when he  tried to pounce on this herd.
 
A buffalo calf: Buffalo herds are remarkable for their lack of hierarchy and an apparent altruism that makes them fiercely protective of calves and weaker members
A buffalo calf: Buffalo herds are remarkable for their  lack of hierarchy and an apparent altruism that makes them  fiercely protective  of calves and weaker members
 
Not to be messed with: When chased by predators the herd sticks close together, calves gathered in the middle. They fight off threats by forming a mob and charging at predators with superior numbers
When chased by predators  the  herd sticks close together, calves gathered in the middle. They  fight off  threats by forming a mob and charging at predators with  superior  numbers

Photographer, Dave Woollacott, captured the  fear etched on the lions face as he frantically tried to escape the furious  buffalo.

Mr Woollacott, a project manager from  Johannesburg, was travelling with his wife, celebrating their 33rd wedding  anniversary, when he spotted the extraordinary scene.

‘It was dusk and the sky was heavy with cloud  when we started to leave the park through the Phabeni Gate,’ he said.

‘Suddenly we came across a herd of Cape  buffalo in a dry river bed.

‘We watched as lion tried to attack from the  left bank.

‘But the buffalo outnumbered him and they  chased the frightened lion away, across the river bed and into the  undergrowth.’

Attribution: Damien Gayle, Mail Online

Sequestor… What?

Despite sequester, Obama to designate five national monuments

 

Even as President Obama highlights impending cuts to national parks  because  of the sequester, he plans to use his power  as president to  designate five new national monuments Monday, according to an   administration official.

The new monuments will be: the Rio  Grande del Norte National Monument  in New Mexico; the San  Juan Islands National Monument in Washington  State; the First  State National Monument in Delaware and Pennsylvania;  the Charles  Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument in Ohio and a  monument  commemorating Harriet Tubman and her role  in helping black  slaves reach freedom through the the Underground Railway in  Maryland.

Rick Smith, of the Coalition  of National Park Retirees, said that the  president acted because Congress  had failed to enact legislation  creating more parks and protected sites.

“Americans support and want more parks and monuments because they  boost  local economies, preserve our national heritage and tell our  diverse American  story,” Mr. Smith told the paper. “In  particular, all  Americans can be proud with the establishment of the First  State  National Monument in Delaware — all 50 states are now home  to an area  included in our National Park System.”

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