The Lunacy of One-Size-Fits-All Law & Regulation

by: the Common Constitutionalist

One of the major platform items of the Ted Cruz campaign is rolling back federal government regulations.

In case you think Cruz is, as some (Trump) would describe him, all talk, no action – early on in Ted’s career at the Federal Trade Commission, Cruz “proposed an ambitious agenda that featured efforts to roll back regulations on teacher certification, hospital accreditation and local governments’ agreements with cable television.” In other words – unlike some Johnny-come-latelys, he’s been walking the walk.

But what is so wrong with government regulation? After all, there must have been a need for someone to suggest a law or regulation. Otherwise, why would anyone wish to regulate another’s behavior?

Why indeed. I am reminded of Sheldon, the anal-retentive genius scientist – one of the main characters on the TV comedy, the Big Bang Theory. He is the dictionary definition of a control freak and insists he always knows best – regarding everything. He would make a great regulator.

In one episode he arrives unexpectedly to a party at his friend’s house, that he had earlier declined an invitation. When he walks in, his best friend asks why he showed up – why was he no longer with his new found friends? Sheldon tells his friend that they were having fun. When asked why this was a problem, he stated that “they were having fun…wrong.” Now that’s a regulator! He would also make a great federal lawmaker, for they too love to needlessly and senselessly regulate society by crafting idiotic legislation to right wrongs where none exist. read more

Government Doesn’t Know Better

from the American Spectator:

The year is drawing to a close and we are supposed to be happy that the lame duck Congress survived its usual year-end brinkmanship and threats of a government shutdown. Horrors! What would the helpless people do if politicians weren’t able to legislate, regulate, and dictate in the “public interest”? Why, the republic would collapse.

Not!

The traditional civics book notion of government at all levels is that the state does for us what we cannot do for ourselves. That’s typically seen as creating the framework for a free society—police, courts, defense, basic health and safety, “public” goods which otherwise wouldn’t be provided.  read more