Dreams of the Caliphate

by: the Common Constitutionalist

 

I heard a little ditty back in May of this year. It’s sure to be a hit to millions worldwide. It wasn’t on American Idol or the Voice. No, it was at a political rally – in Egypt.

The event was for then president Mohammed Morsi, the Obama administration’s preferred Egyptian ruler and member of the Muslim Brotherhood.

At the rally they sang this song:

“O those who long to die a martyr’s death,

 you are all Hamas,

 banish the sleep from the eyes of all the Jews

forget about the whole world, forget the conferences

take up your arms

say your prayers and call to Allah…”

 

Prior to the singing of that short yet poignant ballad another Brotherhood member spoke. Sheikh Safwat al-Higazi spoke of nonpartisan secularism and unity. Like MLK he too has a dream.

Higazi declared: “We see the dream of the Islamic Caliphate, the dream of the land of the Caliphate realized, God willing, by Mohammed Morsi, and his supporters and his brothers and his political party. We have seen the great dream, that we all share, the United Arab States! United Arab States will return, God willing. The United Arab States will be restored by this man and his supporters, God willing. The capital of the caliphate, the capital of the United Arab States will be Jerusalem, God willing. It’s capital will not be Cairo, nor Mecca, nor Medina, only Jerusalem, God willing, and our call will be millions of martyrs are marching to Jerusalem.”

Yes, it sounds just like a peaceful democracy, just as the administration predicted. And did you catch the several references to “United Arab States”?

Well, according to Dr. Mordechai Kedar, the name “United Arab States” was inserted quite purposefully. He claims it was inserted to equate the caliphate to the strength of the United States. And worse, the doctor says the suggestion came from an American. An American currently employed at the State Department.

Others and I have been warning for years of the Muslim Brotherhood infiltration into our government.

But, you might say, Morsi and the brotherhood was just ousted. True but that is a temporary setback. Look at the region to understand the progress they’ve made in just the past decade.

The Muslim Brotherhood has outright or effective control of Turkey, the Palestinian Authority, the Gaza Strip, Tunisia, Morocco and Kuwait. Most likely adding Libya and Syria to that list. All supported by the very rich and very powerful Emirate of Qatar and the al- Jazeera network.

So why has the United States government supported and continue to support them? Because governments are stupid and employ a lot of myopic idiots that claim to be experts. Hillary Clinton was a shining example of this. What did she know about diplomacy or foreign affairs. She was/is a leftist political hack who was given the job as a thank you and to keep her out of the country.

After 9/11 it was thought that the Brotherhood was more moderate than al- Qaeda and the Bush and Obama administrations could more easily deal with their rule of the Middle East. Again, this idea was pushed by the U.S. State Department.

That same department has been trying to reassure Israel that the Brotherhood can be partners in peace, and some, even in Israel are stupid enough to buy it.

King Abdullah of Jordan seems to be one of the few leaders that isn’t buying into the Brotherhood or United States pressure.

He has called the Brotherhood “wolves in sheep’s clothing” and worse.

He understands there is no working with them and does not wish to relinquish his throne for the benefit of the caliphate. He believes that holding the Brotherhood at bay is even more important than the Iranian conflict.

Yet for all the evidence to the contrary, our White House and State Department keep pushing and promoting the radical Brotherhood agenda.

Could they all really be that gullible or is there another agenda?

U.S. Releases $250 Million in Aid to Egypt

In the face of Sequester Armageddon, somehow the feds have found an extra $250 million just layin around. And luckly for the Muslim Brotherhood we did.

John Kerry’s Meets With President Morsi

U.S. Releases $250 Million in Aid to Egypt Following Kerrys Meeting With President Morsi

CAIRO (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Sunday rewarded Egypt for President Mohammed Morsi’s pledges of political and economic reforms by releasing $250 million in American aid to support the country’s “future as a democracy.”

Yet Kerry also served notice that the Obama administration will keep close watch on how Morsi, who came to power in June as Egypt’s first freely elected president, honors his commitment.

“The path to that future has clearly been difficult and much work remains,” Kerry said in a statement after wrapping up two days of meetings in Egypt, a deeply divided country in the wake of the revolution that ousted longtime President Hosni Mubarak.

Egypt is trying to meet conditions to close on a $4.8 billion loan package from the International Monetary Fund. An agreement would unlock more of the $1 billion in U.S. assistance promised by President Barack Obama last year and set to begin flowing with Kerry’s announcement.

“The United States can and wants to do more,” Kerry said. “Reaching an agreement with the IMF will require further effort on the part of the Egyptian government and broad support for reform by all Egyptians. When Egypt takes the difficult steps to strengthen its economy and build political unity and justice, we will work with our Congress at home on additional support.” Continue Reading

Antisemites, Alive and Well

Arab Jew-hate and the western media

by: The Warped Mirror

As much as the media like to report and opine on Israel, they usually do so in a way that presents Arab and Muslim hatred for the Jewish state as an ultimately understandable reaction to Israeli policies. The intense hatred for Jews that is so prevalent throughout the region is a topic that is rarely broached, leaving western audiences oblivious to the fact that in today’s Middle East, antisemitism is as acceptable – and perhaps even more popular – as it was in Nazi Germany.

 

However, it seems that the usual reluctance to report on Arab and Muslim Jew-hatred was deemed untenable when MEMRI recently posted some video clips from 2010 that showed Egypt’s current president Morsi delivering antisemitic rants.  But while this story has by now been widely covered, initially nobody was really eager to report it – as Jeffrey Goldberg highlighted when he entitled a related blog post “Egyptian President Calls Jews ‘Sons of Apes and Pigs’; World Yawns.” Goldberg also linked to a fascinating Forbes story by Richard Behar, who actually took the trouble to monitor how Morsi’s remarks were (not) covered in most of the western media for several days.
As Behar rightly notes, “the demonization of Jews is commonplace and de rigueur in the Arab media (although most Americans wouldn’t know that because they are not being made aware of it).” Behar tried to do his part to counter this lack of knowledge late last November, when he published an article highlighting the “continuous, venomous stream of hate messages disseminated by the PA [Palestinian Authority] through its media and social and education systems.”
In a follow-up to his recent story on the media’s reluctance to report Morsi’s antisemitic rants, Behar notes that eventually, even the White House got around to condemning Morsi’s vile views, and he suggests that this might justify the hope that “the media world (and Washington) may be waking up from its collective stupor–specifically, the timeworn and tiresome routine of ignoring anti-Semitic hate speech by Islamist officials as if it’s to be expected of them, and thus not newsworthy.”
While I don’t share Behar’s optimism, I sure wish he was right, because this would certainly be a most welcome development that would enable many people around the world to have a much better understanding of the Middle East and the reasons for the lack of peace between Arabs and Israel.
This point was emphasized in a related post by Walter Russell Mead, who observed:
“Morsi’s anti-Semitic views are not surprising in themselves; indeed they are completely mainstream and unobjectionable in the Egyptian context. Not many people in Egypt would disagree with the statements in question, and Morsi is more likely to be attacked for being too soft on Israel than for venting his spleen. But these statements, and the widespread support for them, should remind everyone just how slim the chances are for real peace between Israel and its neighbors.
There are a lot of illusions out there about how the exercise of power will moderate the Muslim Brotherhood and similar groups. To some degree, Morsi’s record in office shows a pragmatic willingness to maintain a treaty he deeply loathes with the ‘sons of apes and pigs.’ But we would do better to think of this as caution rather than moderation. If a real opportunity presented itself to destroy the Jewish state, there can be little doubt that Morsi and the members of his movement would think it their duty to act.
For Israel, the lesson is obvious. For the foreseeable future it must depend upon strength rather than trust if it intends to survive.”
Since I asserted above that in today’s Middle East, antisemitism is as acceptable – and perhaps even more popular – as it was in Nazi Germany, let me close with two recent examples that illustrate this point.
The first example comes from the speech by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to mark the recent anniversary of Fatah commemorating the group’s first terror attack against Israel on January 1, 1965. As rightly noted in an analysis of this speech by the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, Abbas used this opportunity to espouse a radical political doctrine:
“Abbas reinforced his uncompromising message with a pledge to continue the path of struggle of previous Palestinian leaders, mentioning the Mufti of Jerusalem, Hajj Amin al-Husseini, who forged a strategic alliance with Nazi Germany, and heads of Palestinian terror organizations who were directly responsible for the murder of thousands of Israeli civilians, including Halil al-Wazir Abu Jihad (Fatah), Sheikh Ahmed Yassin (Hamas), Abd al-Aziz al-Rantisi (Hamas), Fathi al-Shikaki (Islamic Jihad), George Habash (Popular Front), Abu Ali Mustafa (Popular Front), Abu al-Abbas (Arab Liberation Front), and Izzadin al-Qassam (leader of the jihad war against the Jewish Yishuv and the British in the 1930s).”
A translation of the relevant passages of the speech by MEMRI shows that Abbas named Husseini – widely known as “Hitler’s Mufti” – as one of Palestine’s “pioneers.” Given that Abbas has faced much criticism for his Ph.D. thesis that questioned the Holocaust and claimed collaboration between the Nazis and the Zionist movement, he surely knew what he was doing. (And presumably Germany’s Social Democrats know what they are doing when they declare that they have “common values” with Fatah.)
The second example illustrates how this kind of nonchalant embrace of prominent Nazi-collaborators is reflected and amplified on popular social media sites: the Facebook page of “Palestine News” boasts more than 425,000 “Likes,” and when I checked it out just now, it registered “86,142 talking about this.”
A few days ago, this image with a supposed quote from Hitler was posted on the page:
Palestin News Hitler
This posting garnered 1853 “Likes;” the accompanying text is basically the same as a purported Hitler quote provided in a popular “Hitler quotes” app “I could have killed all the Jews in the world, but I spared some of them so you know why I killed the rest.”

Islamic Dictator in Egypt?

Protests rock Egypt after Morsi seizes new powers

from: Reuters

with comments provided by: the Common Constitutionalist [  ]

Protesters stormed the headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood’s party in Alexandria on Friday, throwing chairs and books into the street and setting them alight, after the Egyptian president granted himself sweeping new powers. [Really, who would have seen this coming. Certainly not Bill Kristol ]

Supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi and opponents also threw stones at each other near a mosque in the city, Egypt’s second largest, a witness said. [ Have you noticed, they never seem to run out of stones in these middle-east cities. Do they have them trucked in or something for these special occasions? ]

Two cars had glass smashed as the clashes moved away from the area.

In Port Said, another port on the Mediterranean, hundreds of protesters gathered outside the Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice party headquarters and pelted it with rocks. Some tried to storm it but did not enter, another witness said. There’s the rocks again. Maybe I’ll develop a vending machine that dispenses rocks. Maybe a nickel a rock or 25 for a dollar. ]

In Cairo, thousands demonstrated against the decree issued on Wednesday night, calling Morsi “pharaoh” for seizing new powers.

Morsi’s decree exempting all his decisions from legal challenge until a new parliament was elected caused fury amongst his opponents on Friday who accused him of being the new Hosni Mubarak and hijacking the revolution. [ Didn’t they vote this guy in? Could the Egyptians have been that stupid not to know who Morsi is? On the hand, I should talk; look who we just reelected. ]

Morsi’s aides said the decree was to speed up a protracted transition that has been hindered by legal obstacles but Morsi’s rivals were quick to condemn him as a new autocratic pharaoh who wanted to impose his Islamist vision on Egypt. [ Wow! That sounds eerily familiar; kind of like an Executive Order from a president who just can’t wait around for Congress to act. ]

“Morsi a ‘temporary’ dictator,” was the headline in the independent daily Al-Masry Al-Youm and hundreds of protesters in Tahrir Square, the heart of the 2011 anti-Mubarak uprising, demanded Morsi quit, accusing him of launching a “coup”.

Buoyed by accolades from around the world for mediating a truce between Hamas and Israel, Morsi on Thursday ordered that an Islamist-dominated assembly writing the new constitution could not be dissolved by legal challenges. [ Did anyone else notice that an hour after the treaty was announced, Hamas lobbed a rocket into Israel? Heck of a job, eh? ]

Morsi, an Islamist whose roots are in the Muslim Brotherhood party, also gave himself sweeping powers that allowed him to sack the unpopular general prosecutor and opened the door for a retrial for Mubarak and his aides.

The president’s decree aimed to end the logjam and push Egypt, the Arab world’s most populous nation, more quickly on its democratic path, the presidential spokesman said. [ I think that may be a typo. I think they meant to write theocratic, not democratic, but maybe I’m just splitting hairs. Tomato, Tomahto. ]

“President Morsi said we must go out of the bottleneck without breaking the bottle,” Yasser Ali told Reuters.

The president said any decrees he issued while no parliament sat, could not be challenged; moves that consolidated his powers but look set to polarize Egypt further, threatening more turbulence in a nation at the heart of the Arab Spring.

“The people want to bring down the regime,” shouted protesters in Tahrir, echoing one of the chants that was used in the uprising that forced Mubarak to step down.

The decree is bound to worry Western allies, particularly the United States, a generous benefactor to Egypt’s army, which effusively praised Egypt for its part in bringing Israelis and Palestinians to a ceasefire on Wednesday. [ I can guarntee the Obama administration isn’t the slightest bit worried. I’d lay odds they are supporting Morsi and the Brotherhood government. ]

The West may become concerned about measures that, for example, undermine judicial independence. But one Western diplomat said it was too early to judge and his nation would watch how the decree was exercised in the coming days. [ As long as he is a benevolent dictator, like our beloved leader. ]

“We are very concerned about the possible huge ramifications of this declaration on human rights and the rule of law in Egypt,” Rupert Colville, spokesman for the UN Human Rights Commissioner Navi Pillay, said at the United Nations in Geneva. [ Really! Human Rights? The UN is only ever concerned with human rights abuses when they can claim America is at fault. ]

“The decree is basically a coup on state institutions and the rule of law that is likely to undermine the revolution and the transition to democracy,” Mervat Ahmed, an independent activist in Tahrir protesting against the decree, said. “I worry Morsi will be another dictator like the one before him.” [ No need to worry. It’s too late for that. He will be, and like us here in the U.S., you’re stuck with him. ]

Leading liberal politician Mohamed ElBaradei, who joined other politicians on Thursday night to demand the decree was withdrawn, wrote on his Twitter account that Morsi had “usurped all state powers and appointed himself Egypt’s new pharaoh”.

Brotherhood Taking Total Control of Egypt

Has anyone, anyone at all, gone back and asked the wizards of smart what they make of their sacred “Arab Spring” now?

I’ve been publishing a lot of articles regarding the middle east and in particular, Egypt. There’s a reason for it. Egypt has always been a major player in the middle east. As Egypt goes, so goes the region, so goes Israel and so goes our vital interests in that part of the world. It’s not just Iran and certainly not Syria folks.

While the world persists in looking for signs of pragmatism in the Egyptian president, Mohamed Morsi is quietly taking over all the power bases in the country.

Having gotten rid of the army old guard, he replaced them with his own men – officers belonging to the Muslim Brotherhood or known sympathizers. Then he turned his attention to the media, replacing 50 editors working for the government’s extensive and influential press empire – including Al- Ahram, Al-Akhbar, Al-Gomhuria. He is now busy appointing new governors to the 27 regions of the country.

Hosni Mubarak used to choose retired generals he could depend on for these sensitive posts; Morsi is hand picking party faithful. At the same time upper echelons in government ministries and economic and cultural organizations are methodically being replaced. The Muslim Brotherhood is fast assuming total control. For many observers, the deployment of army units in Sinai is more about proclaiming Egyptian sovereignty in the face of Israel than actually fighting Islamic terrorism.

Drafting the new constitution is their next objective. Brothers and Salafis make up an absolute majority in the Constituent Assembly. Liberal and secular forces are boycotting its sessions, and the Supreme Constitutional Court is examining a request to have it dissolved since it does not conform to the constitution because of its overly Islamic composition; a decision is expected in September.

The assembly, however, is not waiting. According to various leaks, it is putting the final touch to a constitution where all laws have to conform to the Shariah and special committees will supervise the media and forbid any criticism of Islam and of the Prophet. In the wings, is the creation of a Committee of Islamic Sages supervising the law-making process and in effect voiding of substance the parliament elected by the people, though it is not clear yet if, when and how it will work. What is clear is that a parliament made of flesh and blood individuals is against the very nature of the Shariah, where all laws are based on the Koran and the hadiths. This is a far cry from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Morsi has been careful to speak about creating “a civil society”; it is now obvious that what he meant was a society not ruled by the army, and not a secular society. Indeed he had promised to appoint a woman and a Copt as vice presidents, but chose Mohamed Maki, a Sunni known for his sympathy for the Brotherhood and incidentally or not, the brother of the new minister of justice, Prof. Ahmed Maki, known for his independent stands and opposition to Mubarak, but who had carefully concealed his support for the Brothers.

It is worth stressing that the Brotherhood is still operating under conditions of utmost secrecy, as it had been doing during the decades of persecution. How it is getting its funds, who are its members and how they are recruited is not known, nor is its decision-making process. The movement has no legal existence since Gamal Abdel Nasser officially disbanded it in 1954.

That state of affairs was not changed while the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces ruled the country, since apparently the movement did not apply for recognition, fearing perhaps it would have to reveal some of its secrets. Now that it has created its own political party, that the members of that party make up nearly 50 percent of the parliament and that one of their own has been elected president, can the movement remain in the shadows?

Morsi did announce that he was resigning from the Brotherhood, but there is no doubt that he will remain true to the tenets and the commands of its leaders. This is making people increasingly uneasy. They had other expectations of the revolution.

Opposition to an Islamic regime is growing, though it is far from being united. The three small liberal parties that had had very little success in the parliamentary elections have now set up a new front, The Third Way, to fight the Brotherhood’s takeover. Hamdeen Sabahi, leader of the nationalistic Karama (Dignity) Party, who had garnered 18% of the votes in the first round of the presidential election, has launched “The Popular Current” promoting the old Nasserist pan-Arab ideology.

Some of the nongovernmental media are vocal in their criticism of Morsi, though it can be costly: Private television station Al- Pharaein – “the Pharaohs” – was shut down after it called to get rid of Morsi; its owner, Tawfik Okasha, well known for his hostility to the Brothers (and to Israel) and who called for a massive demonstration this Friday, was put under house arrest, as was the editor of the daily Al-Dostour that had criticized the president. The editors of two other dailies – Al-Fajer and Saut el-Umma – were questioned. Other papers such as Al-Akhbar stopped publishing opinion pieces from their regular collaborators known for their opposition to the Brothers; well-known publicists left their page blank in a gesture of solidarity for their colleagues.

Morsi knows that his takeover will strengthen the opposition. He has not forgotten that he barely mustered 25% of the votes in the first round of the presidential election – down from the nearly 50% who voted for his party’s candidates in the parliamentary elections. He also knows that the people are no longer afraid to take to the streets to protest – and that it is now said that a new dictatorship is replacing the old – the only difference being that the new ruler has a beard….

However, for now he is devoting all his energy to his fight with the judiciary, long known for its independent stands. The Supreme Constitutional Court is being asked to rule the Brotherhood Movement illegal, and therefore to proclaim that the Liberty and Justice party it created – and which won 50% of the seats in the parliament – is illegal as well, and therefore to invalidate the election of Morsi, candidate of a movement and a party that are both illegal. Morsi sent his new justice minister to browbeat the court, but the judges refused to back down. The president is now working to limit the prerogatives of the court in the new constitution and will start “retiring” senior justices appointed by Mubarak.

Friday’s demonstration will be the first real test for the Brotherhood. It is taking no chances and security forces will be deployed around its institutions throughout the country. A cleric at Al-Azhar issued a fatwa calling for the killing of whoever protests against the rule of the Brotherhood; the resulting uproar was such that he was disavowed by some of the leaders of the movement. However, whatever happens Friday will not deter them from their goal – a thoroughly Islamist Egypt.

Attribution: ZVI MAZEL (former ambassador to Egypt), Jerusalem Post