Pleas Fall on Deaf EPA Ears

The EPA Rejects Governors’ Plea Over Ethanol

The governors of seven drought afflicted states petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency, asking for a suspension of rules requiring refiners to blend biofuel — mostly ethanol — into the nation’s gasoline supply.

The governors of Georgia, Texas, Arkansas, drought-afflicted statesNorth Carolina, Maryland, New Mexico, and Delaware contended that the renewable fuel standard (RFS) program requiring the use of biofuel, combined with the worst drought in 40 years, had pushed corn prices to record highs and harmed the states’ meat and dairy producers, who use corn as an animal feed.

On Friday, Nov. 16, the Obama administration’s EPA turned down the petition.

This year about 4.7 billion bushels, or 40 percent of the nation’s corn crop, will be used for ethanol production, and ethanol production is set to increase next year.

The Clean Air Act authorizes EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to waive the RFS targets for ethanol production for one year if the requirements would “severely harm” the economy of a state or the nation as a whole, which the governors claimed they do.food-prices-rise

Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe’s petition to the EPA stated that “virtually all of Arkansas is suffering from severe, extreme, or exceptional drought conditions,” and rising corn prices are “having a severe economic impact” on the state’s livestock producers.

“While the drought may have triggered the price spike in corn,” the fuel standards exacerbated the problem — the policy boosted corn prices 193 percent since 2005.

He also asserted that livestock producers hit hard by rising corn prices “represent nearly half” of the state’s farm sales.

“However, the EPA stacked the decks against petitioners, establishing a burden of proof that was virtually impossibleethanol to meet,” according to Mario Lewis, a senior fellow in energy and environmental policy at the Competitive Enterprise Institute.

In an article on National Review Online, Lewis explained that the EPA in essence required the petitioners to show that the biofuel requirement was entirely responsible for the harm and not merely a contributing factor, and that waiving the requirement would “remedy” the hardship facing livestock producers.

“These criteria are ridiculous,” Lewis declared.

“The Clean Air Act does not require the EPA to don analytical blinkers and ignore other factors that, in combination with the RFS, cause severe harm, nor does it say that any waiver granted must be a silver bullet.”ethanol scam

But he adds: “This cloud may yet have a silver lining. Jackson’s rejection of the waiver petitions exposes the RFS program as an arbitrary, inflexible system that provides corporate welfare to corn farmers at the expense of livestock producers, consumers, and hungry people in developing countries.”

Administrator Jackson was designated for the post by President-elect Obama in December 2008, and she was confirmed by the Senate in January 2009.

Lewis observes: “The EPA’s decision may very well build support for RFS reform — or repeal.”

Attribution: Drudge Report

EPA Get’s Cut to the Bone

House appropriators advance spending bill that would slash the EPA’s funding

from: Erika Johnsen at HotAir:

Ah, such a tease! I can’t say I have much faith that, the way things stand right now, this bill will get any traction, but it’s beautiful to think about nonetheless.

In May a House committee has managed to advance a 2013 spending bill that would impose deep cuts and restrictions on the Environmental Protection Agency.

The bill cuts EPA by $1.4 billion, about 17 percent, compared to current funding. The GOP points out that this brings the EPA below fiscal 1998 funding.

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), who hails from coal country, said he is especially proud of the measure, which was advanced from subcommittee to the full spending panel on a voice vote.

“This represents the strong concerns of this Congress over the EPA’s unprecedented effort

Lisa Jackson, Head Thug

to drive certain industries to extinction with a cocktail of burdensome regulations, questionable guidance policies, and arbitrary enforcement measures — all designed to shut down the permitting process for energy exploration and production,” he said.

It contains a number of environmental riders, including one to prevent the EPA from regulating greenhouse gases using New Source Performance Standards and one stopping EPA from expanding its ability to regulate “navigable waters” under the Clean Water Act.

The bill contains several riders, including one that would stop the EPA from using the New Source Performance Standards to regulate greenhouse gases and another that would prevent them from expanding their authority to regulate “navigable waters” under the Clean Water Act (case in point: That one was their excuse for crucifying — woops, I meant persecuting — an Idaho couple in the egregious case of Sackett v. EPA).

I’ve made no secret of my unadulterated disdain for the Environmental Protection Agency — while I think there can be such a thing as effective government environmental regulation, the EPA is a wildly intrusive, power-tripping, practically unbridled band of overzealous environmentalist crusaders who are often conveniently disallowed from considering the costs of their policies because they ostensibly have only the “public’s best interest in mind”. Their frivolous litigation, crippling sanctions, and uncertainty-inducing agenda are some of the more significant obstacles our economy faces.

I dare not even consider the possibility that the EPA could someday be eliminated, but the thought of at least watching them take any kind of a hit that could rein in some of their wanton regulatory ways, instead of being allowed to metastasize even more, pleases me to no end. (Especially since, you know, we’ve been operating at above trillion-dollar deficits and a lot of stuff has just got to go.)

Politico and certain Democrats have labeled Republicans’ various efforts to put the brakes on some of the EPA’s forthcoming rules and regulations as an “attack”.

This is just the latest round of Republican attacks that has forced the White House to hold back on new environmental regulations, lawmakers say — at least for now.

“They have slowed down some of that stuff, but it’s only until after the election,” Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho) said. “After that, it’s going to be scary.” …

“The unrelenting attacks by the Republicans on environmental protection, I think, have caused people in the administration to be careful to pick their fights,” said California Rep. Henry (nostrilitis) Waxman, the top Democrat hack on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

You’re darn straight it’s an attack — I should hope that Republicans keep on engaging in a full-frontal assault on the out-of-control independent agency that manages to kill jobs and opportunities like its their sole purpose in life.

The EPA Must Just Hate Us All

This may cause blood to shoot out of your eyes. As Glenn Beck says; this is a true “Duct Tape” moment.

These people have to go!!

From EPAabuse.com:

The EPA has brought surface mining to a halt in Appalachia, allegedly to protect the Mayfly. In surface mining, the miners put the rock and dirt in the surrounding areas or valleys. When water flows through these areas, it can become saltier. The salt may be harmful to Mayflies. It is not harmful to humans.

What’s a Mayfly? It’s a tiny insect that lives in a larvae stage in water for as long as three years. As an adult, it has no usable mouth and usually lives no longer than three hours. The females reproduce during that brief time and then die. In short, these are essentially worthless insects.

To the EPA and the environmentalists, however, the existence of the Mayfly is excuse enough to shut down coal mining in one area of our nation. Lisa Jackson and Obama are willing to sacrifice an abundant source of energy to protect a bug that lives only three hours to lay more eggs.

Ah, but there’s more.

In Nebraska, environmentalists are busy protecting the American burying beetle from the evils of the Keystone XL pipeline. The burying beetle (Nicorphorus americanus) in Nebraska makes its home in the Sand Hills – a route contemplated by the TransCanada corporation for the pipeline.

Because of the beetle, the TransCanada corp. is overhauling its plans so it can avoid the beetle habitat. The company had originally agreed to pledge $2 million to encourage ranching practices that protected the beetles or to purchase land that would be managed for the beetles.
Wyatt Hoback, a University of Nebraska biology professor was actually hired by TransCanada to work with his students to trap and move 2,400 beetles from the original pipeline path, which cut across 100 miles of the Sand Hills.

Hoback’s relocation project for burying beetles was covered on “Dirty Jobs” on the Discovery Channel.

Imagine this: Three environmental groups actually filed a federal lawsuit challenging the relocation program for these endangered beetles! Apparently, it’s not even permissible to move a bug from where they live to a safe location where they won’t be crushed by bulldozers.

The burying beetle’s Sand Hills home is safe from the evil pipeline.
Once TransCanada locates another route through Nebraska, rest assured that some bug-loving lunatic will find yet another bug, mouse, tic, plant or endangered rock formation to protect from the wicked energy producers.

And, you can expect that the EPA will jump on whatever excuse it can find to stop energy production in the U.S. It is clear that Lisa Jackson and her radical allies love bugs more than humans.