WND Exclusive – Independence Day deaths marked by Divine Providence

from Brent Smith for World Net Daily:

There were five Founding Fathers who became president. Some would say that, no, in fact there were six. What about John Quincy Adams? Was he not a founder?

No he wasn’t. He was the son of second President John Adams, but was only a child of the Revolution.

The five, in order, were of course George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe.

It was Divine Providence that brought all these great men together at this exact place and this exact time in history. It was through acts of Divine Providence that the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were crafted and signed. It was Divine Providence that assisted in the founding of our nation. read more

It’s Not July 4th, It’s Independence Day

by: Brent Smith 

On July 2, 1776, George Washington sent general orders to his officers explaining the war effort:

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their Houses, and Farms, are to be pillaged and destroyed, and they consigned to a State of Wretchedness from which no human efforts will probably deliver them. read more

Be Proud of the Ragged Old Flag

It’s Independence Day. A time for reflection and celebration – of why this is greatest country on God’s green Earth.

A day to fly the flag just a little higher and salute it a little longer.

And worry not if your flag is not in the greatest shape. Fly it proudly – unashamedly! read more

A Declaration of Independency

by: Brent Smith

It was May of 1775 and the second Continental Congress met for the first time. Growing weary of King George III’s utter lack of attention towards the petition to redress grievances sent by the first Continental Congress, the colonists decided to act.

In June of that year the Congress developed their own currency separate of the crown. They also established the first Continental Army, calling themselves the “United Colonies.”

Getting word of the colonies seditious behavior the King declared that the American colonists were “engaged in open and avowed rebellion.” The British Parliament passed the “American Prohibitory Act” later that year, which instituted a naval blockade of all American ports and halted the colonies’ trade with the world and among each other.

March of 1776 saw the second Continental Congress pass “The Privateering Act” giving privateers permission to attack British blockade vessels, for the colonies had not the funds to form a proper Navy. read more