Podcast – Hong Kong to Coronavirus – Not in our City – Palestinians Can’t Have Peace

by: Brent Smith

Today I discuss why Chinese president Xi-Jinping would choose to house a large population of those infected by the coronavirus in Hong Kong of all places, instead of a far safer quarantine zone, such as one of the many ghost cities in China.

I also discuss why the Palestinians have rejected the latest, more than generous offer of peace – one in which, for the first time, neighboring Muslim countries even support. read more

Hong Kong Housing

Can you believe these are actually apartments? The stunning images of Hong Kong ‘living cubicles’ that look just like Borg cubes

These mind-boggling images capture the scale  of soaring apartment blocks in one of the world’s most densely populated areas;  Hong Kong.

As home to a population of more than seven  million crammed into an area measuring just 424 square miles, space in Hong Kong  is at a premium.

It means that, when it comes to providing  accommodation for Hong Kong’s huge population, the only way to go is  up.

Mind-boggling: Photographer Michael Wolf's incredible shots capture the extreme scale of skyscrapers in one of the world's most densely populated places; Hong Kong
 Photographer Michael Wolf’s incredible  shots capture the extreme scale of skyscrapers in one of the world’s most  densely populated places; Hong Kong

The result is the soaring high-rise  buildings captured to incredible effect by German photographer Michael Wolf in  his project Architecture of Density.

The images reveal the densely packed  apartments crammed into towering skyscrapers, with laundry spilling from barred  windows and hanging over cramped balconies.

Earlier this year the Hong Kong-based Society  for Community Organisation (SoCO) highlighted the plight of the city’s most  under-privileged people, increasing numbers of whom are being forced to live in  almost inconceivably small spaces.

In districts including Sham Shui Po, Yau Tsim  Mong, and Kowloon City, families, elderly people and the unemployed are crammed  into living quarters that are barely bigger than a toilet cubicle in some  cases.

The combination of Hong Kong’s huge  population and sky-high rents – around HKD$90 ($12) per square foot a month – has  led to a housing shortage that is affecting hundreds of thousands of the city’s  poorest people, SoCo said.

Close-quarters: Washing can be seen hanging from the seemingly countless windows of this towering Hong Kong apartment block
 Washing can be seen hanging from the  seemingly countless balconies of this towering Hong Kong apartment  block
City dwellers: Hong Kong is home to a population of more than seven million people, squeezed into an area measuring just 424 square miles
 Hong Kong is home to a population of more  than seven million people, squeezed into an area measuring just 424 square  miles
Dilapidated: The photographer documents some less than idyllic living quarters in Hong Kong, where charities have highlighted the plight of underprivileged residents trying to afford a home in a place where space is at a premium
 The photographer documents some less than  idyllic living quarters in Hong Kong, where charities have highlighted the  plight of underprivileged residents trying to afford a home in a place where  space is at a premium
Construction: The photographer has documented more building work underway in Hong Kong as the city struggles to find space for its already cramped population
 The photographer has documented more  building work underway in Hong Kong as the city struggles to find space for its  already cramped population
Architecture of Destiny: This image of a pink tower block soaring high into the skies above Hong Kong could almost be mistaken for a piece of abstract art
 This image of a pink tower  block soaring high into the skies above Hong Kong could almost be mistaken for a  piece of abstract art

 

Night-life: Rent in Hong Kong costs around HKD$90 (£8) per square foot a month, and the waiting list for public housing is so long that urban slums have sprung up around the city
 Rent in Hong Kong costs around HKD$90 ($12)  per square foot a month, and the waiting list for public housing is so long that  urban slums have sprung up around the city
Over-population: These photographs of Hong Kong's apartment buildings appear to reflect a city bursting at the seams
 These photographs of Hong Kong’s  apartment buildings appear to reflect a city bursting at the seams
Prosperous: Charities in Hong Kong have warned of the growing divide between the area's rich elite and the increasing numbers living in poverty
 Charities in Hong Kong have warned of the  growing divide between the area’s rich elite and the increasing numbers living  in poverty
Inspiration: German photographer Michael Wolf documents the extreme nature of Hong Kong's urban developments in his series Architecture of Density
German photographer Michael Wolf documents  the extreme nature of Hong Kong’s urban developments in his series Architecture  of Density

Attribution: Kerry Mcdermott, Mail Online