It’s Constitution Day!

The History of Constitution Day

The U.S. Capitol Building
Citizens of the United States have celebrated Independence Day and Presidents’ Day since the 1870s, and in 2005, the nation began to celebrate Constitution Day. Also know as Citizenship Day, Constitution Day is an American holiday honoring the day 39 delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed the United States Constitution. This historic date was September 17, 1787.

“I Am an American Day”

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It’s V-E Day!

On this day in 1945, both Great Britain and the United States celebrate Victory in Europe Day. Cities in both nations, as well as formerly occupied cities in Western Europe, put out flags and banners, rejoicing in the defeat of the Nazi war machine.

The eighth of May spelled the day when German troops throughout Europe finally laid down their arms. read more

What Not to Get the Kids for Christmas

by: the Common Constitutionalist:

As Christmas draws near, I thought I might depart, if only for a day, from the political arena where I usually reside, and present something a little less controversial.

Did I say less controversial? Well, you be the judge.

A rare toy figure of Adolf Hitler made for German children  was revealed last year by the son of a World War II soldier for the first time.

The figure of the fascist dictator was part of a collection of toys U.S Private Jerome Beaulier bought at a toy shop in Germany at the end of the war in exchange for cigarettes and chocolate bars.

He mailed them back to his five-year-old son  Jerry, who received them in 1945 and has kept them ever since.

 The four-inch tall Hitler figure is seated in  the front passenger seat of a German army jeep alongside three soldiers.

Nothing Says Merry Christmas like a Tiny Hitler!

Other toys included in the set are an anti-aircraft gun, several field guns, another truck with a huge search light attached and a First World War German biplane. read more

Manifesto, Then and Now

by: the Common Constitutionalist

In 2008, many unsuspecting voters took a cursory look at candidate Barack Obama and saw something new and different. By now a good number of those ignorant citizens have wised up, at least enough to recognize that Barack “Philip Dru” Obama is nothing new. He is just a logical choice of a progressive ideal that began long ago, toward the turn of  last century, whose goal was turning the American Republic into a socialist utopia.

Moses Mordecai Marx Levy, a.k.a. Karl Marx, published his Communist Manifesto in 1848. However, his Manifesto borrowed so heavily from a book written by Clinton Roosevelt, The Science of Government Founded on Natural Law, published in 1841, which Marx was introduced to at a Reading Room of the British Museum, that it was close to plagiarism. Author Emanuel M. Josephson even called Science, “Roosevelt’s Communist Manifesto”. What a coincidence Clinton Roosevelt is related to 2 of the 3 early progressive presidents, Teddy and Franklin. I guess it must run in the family.

Marx’s Communist Manifesto had been commissioned by the Communist League in London. The League, formerly known as the League of the Just (or the League of Just Men), was an offshoot of the Parisian Outlaws League (which evolved from the Jacobin movement).

Both Clinton Roosevelt and Horace Greeley, owner of the New York Tribune, the country’s first national newspaper, provided funds for the Communist League in London to pay for the publication of Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto. Moreover, Greeley put Marx on his newspapers’ payroll. Imagine that, the father of modern-day communism on the payroll of a New York newspaper.

Both Roosevelt’s Science and Marx’s Manifesto agreed on the prerequisites for the implementation of communism. Let’s take a look at these 12 prerequisites for creation of a communist society juxtaposing present-day America. How close are we? You be the judge: read more

Radicalism Lives in New Hampshire

by: the Common Constitutionalist

A few miles up the road from my house is a prestigious private school. The average schlub like myself could not, and now knowing what I know, would not send my children there.

The prestigious Derryfield School “educates” students, grades 6 through 12, and costs in excess of $28,000 per year.

It is said that if you graduate from there, you’ve written your own ticket and have your pick of any of the Ivy League schools. I know this generally to be a fact.

So for that kind of money, the school must be able to attract the finest teachers in the land, right? That and the heated, Field Turf lacrosse field. I must admit – that is nice.

Well, I suppose it depends on one’s definition of finest. By finest, if you mean a teacher who will mold and shape your young, highly impressionable offspring into a guilty white, self-loathing, American hating liberal, then yes, you’d be correct.

One of Derryfields finest is a history teacher, David Pook, a big defender of the Common Core Curriculum.

David believes that American schools need to have nationalized standards so minority students can learn to read as well as white students. Yes of course David, because students “of color” are naturally too “stupid” to learn, or frankly accomplished anything, without the help of the benevolent federal government. What a racist thing to say! read more

Morgan and Muskets

Piers Morgan Says Second Amendment Only Meant for Muskets

by:

Piers Morgan has a great English accent, but it’s obvious that he doesn’t know much about the United States Constitution. Morgan is editorial director of First News, a national newspaper for children, and the host of CNN’s Piers Morgan Tonight. As with most of these show hosts, they aren’t very informed when it comes to history and logic.

Morgan got into a debate over gun control after Bob Costas went on his anti-gun rant following Jovan Belcher’s murder of his girlfriend and his later suicide.

Trying to add credibility to his anti-gun position, Morgan made reference to the Unitedsecond amendment States Constitution. Here’s what he said:

“The Second Amendment was devised with muskets in mind, not high-powered handguns and assault rifles. Fact.”

See if you can find this claim in the Second Amendment:

“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

Even without this embedded constitutional right, we have the right to bear arms. Rights don’t come from the State. This point is not often made. The Constitution doesn’t say that we have a right to work or own property. The Second Amendment was included in the Constitution to ensure the already existing right to “keep and bear arms.” Morgan should study some of his own British history before he spouts off in America.

twitter“The right to have arms in English history is believed to have been regarded as a long-established natural right in English law, auxiliary to the natural and legally defensible rights to life. In District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), the Supreme Court remarked that at the time of the passing of the English Bill of Rights there was “‘clearly an individual right, having nothing whatsoever to do with service in the militia’ and that it was a right not to be disarmed by the crown and was not the granting of a new right to have arms.”

The Second Amendment doesn’t say what type of “arms” is included in the right to bear them. There’s a reason for this. Our founders knew that the definition of “arms” can change over time. What were “arms” in the 18th century differed from what would have been defined as “arms” in the 13th century. The Constitution was designed to be a document for the ages, not just for the late 18th century.

Following Morgan’s logic, the freedoms of speech and press found in the First Amendment should be limited to a town crier, horses and footmen to carry communiques, quill pens, and actual printing presses. This would mean setting type by hand, rolling ink ever theAmerican Muskets type, and pressing the paper on the raised letters, one sheet at a time. Since we don” press” paper over type today, therefore, to follow Morgan’s logic, we can’t appeal to the First Amendment’s right to “freedom of the press.”

If the Second Amendment was only for muskets, then it was also only for parchment and literal printing presses. Our founders knew better. Ideals transcend technology and innovation. Ideals are for the ages.

The six books I wrote in the 1980s were typeset electronically. Even so, the galley sheets still had to be pasted on boards so plates could be made. No one in the 18th century, or even in the last decade of the 20th century, could have conceived of printing exclusively with digits by way of a Portable Document Format PDF.

Printing has made more technical advancements since the First Amendment was drafted than have “arms.” A founding father from the 18th century could easily recognize a modern-day handgun and rifle, but would be stymied by a laptop computer with software that is used to typeset a book with no hard type that could be turned into an electronic file that in the end could print a million copies of a book in days.

Shoot the Nullifier!

FL Senate President Laughs At Constitutionalist

by:  and the Common Constitutionalist

Republican Florida State Senate President Don Gaetz showed the true face of tyrannical RINOs in the Republican Party when he openly laughed and mocked the Constitutional principles espoused by KrisAnne Hall, an attorney and former prosecutor, who supports the Tenth Amendment and the right of the States to nullify unconstitutional laws implemented by the federal government. However, it appears that Mr. Gaetz also indicated his support of the tactic of the seventh President of the United States Andrew Jackson inNullifyObamacare how he would deal with “nullifiers.” He would have them shot and hanged.

According to Mrs. Hall, she not only spoke to Gaetz, but even wrote him and explained the positions of men like James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and Alexander Hamilton on State sovereignty. She then received what can only be explained as a violence threatening email from Gaetz to anyone that would support nullification. Here’s what Sen. Gaetz wrote:

Thank you for your email and for your passionate views.

Like you, I believe Obamacare is unconstitutional and wrong-headed policy. I have consistently voted in the Florida Legislature for legislation that affirms our state’s options, obligations and sovereignty under the United States Constitution. I am working every day to ensure the election of national candidates who will repeal and replace this extraordinarily bad policy.

10th-amendmentAs to nullification, I tend to favor the approach used by Florida’s first Governor, Andrew Jackson:

It is said that one evening, while he was president, General Jackson was interrupted in his reading in his bedroom by an alarmed military aide who breathlessly reported, “Mr. President, the “nullifiers” are in front of the Executive Mansion with torches and guns. They are screaming that each state has the right to decide for itself which federal laws to follow. They threaten to burn us down if you will not agree with them.”

Without lifting his head from his reading, Andrew Jackson said, “Shoot the first nullifier who touches the Flag. And hang the rest.

Chaplain, I have sworn an oath on my father’s Bible before Almighty God to preserve, protect and defend the constitution and government of the United States. And that’s exactly what I intend to do. Count me with Andrew Jackson.

Senator Don Gaetz

From the Common Constitutionalist: Well, at least progressives are consistent. Whether they be democrat or republican matters not. A progressive is always in favor of siding with big government; the bigger the better. It’s also nice to hear Senator Gaetz is a big fan of that swine, Andrew Jackson. Lest you have forgotten or are a new reader, the following is an excerpt pulled from an article I wrote a while back regarding another progressive, Newt Gingrich. In it, I extolled the virtues of President Jackson:

Many believe the Father of Progressivism was Theodore Roosevelt. In fact it was Andrew Jackson. Andrew Jackson came to prominence as the Founding Fathers died out and I believe the republic that they envisioned also died with Jackson. He could not have done what he did if they had been around.

Jackson believed in Manifest Destiny, which is kind of the perversion of Divine Providence. Divine Providence occurs when you live your life in a good and moral way, try your best and pull yourself up by the bootstraps, God will open doors for you. You know, “Good things happen to good people”.

Manifest Destiny is more of the, “Get out of my way. I’m on a mission from God”. It’s my way or the highway. Like all progressives, he knew better than the people.

Founding Fathers = Divine Providence, Progressives = Manifest Destiny. It’s no surprise Jackson was also the father of the democrat party.

He declared war on the Bank of the United States (B.U.S.). I’m no fan of any national bank but unlike the Federal Reserve of today, the B.U.S. did not wield nearly the power of today’s central bank.

Although he declared it, he was not championing the working class or Ron Paul supporters. He claimed to be fighting for the “little man”. Sound familiar? In fact he just wanted to shut the bank down because he couldn’t control it. Jackson simply wanted to replace it with another bank completely controlled by him and his party. Progressives must control all things for the betterment of society. They arrest control by pretending to be the champions of the “Little Guy”.

Most Americans think the Civil War was fought solely about slavery. In fact AndrewTariff of 1832 Jackson started the ball rolling when he signed the Tariff of 1832 that taxed imported and exported goods. The North grew successfully under this tariff. The tax was rough on the southerners. As Andrew Jackson continued to tax goods, southerners found it hard to sell their products to the English and suffered badly.. South Carolina firmly refused to pay the taxes and threatened to withdraw from the Union if the tariff was enforced. It was eventually rewritten, but the damage between the North & South had been done.

Like the progressives that would follow, he was also a flaming racist. He believed neither Indians nor blacks should own any property in the U.S. He particularly hated Indians.

We have all heard of the “Trail of Tears”. That was Andrew Jackson’s doing. He declared war on the Eastern Indian Tribes, signing the Indian Removal Act. There would be no tribes east of the Mississippi. Many Indians were massacred. Those he didn’t have killed, were driven west along; you guessed it,  “The Trail of Tears”. Many of the Indians died on the trail (roughly 25%), freezing to death.

His excuse for the atrocity was, “Well, we needed the land, so we took it”. Manifest Destiny.

Sunshine and Swastikas

This collection of rare color photos of Berlin in 1937, taken by Thomas Neumann and uncovered from Norwegian archives,  show life in the German capital during a tumultuous decade.

They capture scenes in the vibrant city,  which was under the iron grip of Adolf Hitler and his Third Reich at the very height of his power. Yet just eight years later the city was in ruins as Russians and Allies occupied it in victory.

But at the time these images were taken,  Hitler’s Berlin was vibrant. Hitler had taken power after the collapse of the democratic Weimar Republic in 1933 as severe economic problems caused by the Depression drove ordinary Germans into the Nazi party’s arms.

As well as chilling pictures of  buildings emblazoned with swastikas, there are scenes of ordinary life as Germans go about their business. They show a child in a sun-drenched square, smiling friends at a train station, a cart selling bananas and a food vendor in a sunny  park.

Regal: These rare color photos of Berlin in 1937 give a unique perspective of the capital's pre-war period. The Stadtschloss, or Berlin City Palace. It was heavily damaged during bombing and demolished by East German authorities after the warThese rare color photos of Berlin in 1937 give a  unique perspective of the capital’s pre-war period. The Stadtschloss, or Berlin  City Palace, was heavily damaged during bombing and demolished by East German  authorities after the war
Devastated: The Stadtschloss after it was gutted by Allied bombs. It was torn down by East German authorities after the war but is currently being rebuiltThe Stadtschloss after it was gutted by Allied bombs. It was torn down by East German authorities after the war but is  currently being rebuilt
Ominous: In 1937 Hitler was at the very peak of his power. Ordinary Germans were content and opposition was being ruthlessly crushed In 1937 Hitler was at the very peak of his power. Ordinary Germans were content and opposition was being ruthlessly crushed
Smiling: An unknown trio at a train station. it is likely they were friends or colleagues of the photographer An unknown trio at a train station. It is  likely they were friends or colleagues of the photographer
Rally: Soldiers and civilians at a rally on the decorated streets in Berlin. This photo is believed to have been taken on Labour Day (May 1) in 1937Soldiers and civilians at a rally on the decorated streets in Berlin. This photo is believed to have been taken on Labor Day (May 1) in 1937
Bustle: A cart sells fruit on a busy Berlin streetA cart sells fruit on a busy Berlin  street

Norwegian engineer Thomas Neumann (1901-1978)  took the photos while working in Germany. The film he used was the first of its kind, and there are few similar images preserved in Norwegian collections. His colored pictures gives historians a valuable view of the interwar period.

In 2007 his photo gallery given to the  National Archives of Norway by his daughter.

Thomas Neumann trained as an electrical engineer in Dresden. After graduating in 1928 he worked in Berlin until 1933.  Neumann was a member of the National Unity party, a fascist organization and was appointed its propaganda leader in Oslo and Akershus. He left the party in 1937 and in October 1944 he was arrested for illegal activities and sent to the notorious Grini concentration camp.

Echoes of history: This street scene shows the Augustiner Keller, a beer cellar in central Berlin. Few buildings were not festooned with Nazi regalia This street scene shows the  Augustiner Keller, a beer cellar in central Berlin. Few buildings were not  festooned with Nazi regalia
Power: Hitler had consolidated his power by the mid-1930s, thanks to widespread disillusionment with the Weimar Republic Hitler had consolidated his power by the  mid-1930s, thanks to widespread disillusionment with the Weimar Republic
Youth: A little boy outside an unknown sunny square in BerlinA little boy outside an unknown sunny square in  Berlin
Order: This intimidating picture shows troops lining a boulevard festooned with swastikas in anticipation of a parade This intimidating picture shows troops lining a boulevard festooned with swastikas in anticipation of a parade
Relaxation: Berliners enjoy snacks in a sun-soaked park Berliners enjoy snacks in a sun-soaked park
Crowds: The pictures were taken by Thomas Neumann, a Norwegian engineer who worked in Germany The pictures were taken by Thomas Neumann, a  Norwegian engineer who worked in Germany
Church and state: Swastikas and a maypole outside Berlin CathedralSwastikas and a maypole outside Berlin Cathedral
Docking: Two men in suits aboard the steamer Preussen, presumably approaching GermanyTwo men in suits aboard the steamer Preussen,  presumably approaching Germany
Quiet moment: A driver leans against a state car and enjoys a cigarette. The photos show candid moments among Berliners A driver leans against a state car and enjoys a cigarette. The photos show candid moments among Berliners

One candid picture shows a Brownshirt  (a member of Hitler’s paramilitary force) lounging against a state car  in front of a building draped with the maligned Nazi symbol.

On 30 January 1933, President Hindenburg, under pressure from Franz von Papen, appointed Hitler as Chancellor of Germany.  Shortly after the Fuhrer seized power.

The Nazi government restored prosperity and ended mass unemployment using heavy military spending. Extensive public works were also undertaken, including the construction of the Autobahns, to boost employment.

Just two years later Germany would invade Poland and begin the most destructive war the world has ever seen. An estimated 60 million people lost their lives as a result of the Second World War and the global political landscape changed forever.

Ripple: The 1937 May Day celebration was also a celebration of 700 years of Berlin's history The 1937 May Day celebration was also a  celebration of 700 years of Berlin’s history
Grand: The Messe Berlin situated in Berlin-Westend. It was completed in 1937The Messe Berlin situated in Berlin-Westend. It  was completed in 1937 yet heavily bombed by Allied aircraft
Masses: A lkarge crowd in Berlin, presumably in connection with Labour Day A large crowd in Berlin, presumably in  connection with Labor Day
Force: In this picture we see military personnel father beneath decorations. An officer appears to be inspecting the men  In this picture we see military personnel father beneath decorations. An officer appears to be inspecting the men
Overseer: A guard in a pristine white uniform looks on at a gathering crowdA guard in a pristine white uniform looks on  at a gathering crowd
Civilians: Walkers on a mystery German street. Eight years later it would have been filled with Russian, British and American troopsWalkers on a mystery German street. Eight years later it would have been filled with Russian, British and American  troops
Serene: An unknown park in Berlin. The heat of the summer of 1937 meant sprinklers were required to keep the grass verdantAn unknown park in Berlin. The heat of the summer of 1937 meant sprinklers were required to keep the grass verdant
History: Flags snap and flap in the breeze among a throng of Germans celebrating May day Flags snap and flap in the breeze among a throng of Germans celebrating May day
Colourful: Berliners gather to look at a giant maypole outside the Berlin City CathedralBerliners gather to look at a giant maypole outside the Berlin City Cathedral

Attribution: Sam Webb

1000 Year Old Find

Pieces of a medieval board game and 1,000-year-old combs are among rare artifacts uncovered during an archaeological dig that is set to rewrite the history books.

Experts have hailed the finding in Co Fermanagh  as internationally significant, claiming they shed new light on life in medieval Ireland and its connection with the wider world.

Iron, bronze and bone ornaments have been discovered at the crannog just outside Enniskillen, along with the chess-like pieces believed to have been part of the game.

Parts of log boats, leather shoes, knives, decorated dress pins, wooden vessels and a bowl with a cross carved on its base have also been unearthed during the six-month dig.

Find: This pair of iron shears was among the items uncovered during an archaeological dig just outside Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh This pair of iron shears was among the items  uncovered during an archaeological dig just outside Enniskillen, Co  Fermanagh
Weapons, such as this iron spearhead, were also found, giving an idea as to how they lived at the timeWeapons, such as this iron spearhead, were also found, giving an idea as to how they lived at the time

The style and design of the antler and bone combs suggest influences from northern Europe and indicate that the Fermanagh settlement had international links 1,000 years ago.

The Drumclay Crannog, which is an artificial island built on a lake, is the first of its type to be excavated in the north of Ireland since 1870.

Archaeologists believe people may have lived there from 600 AD to 1600 AD, and it was probably the home of a noble family, with perhaps four or five houses inhabited at any time. Parents, grandparents, children and servants would all have stayed on the crannog.

The artifacts uncovered so far date back to 900 AD but there are still a number of layers of settlement yet to be excavated.

Stormont Environment Minister Alex Attwood visited the site today and announced plans for an open day to allow the public to tour the crannog and talk to the archaeologists.

‘On my two visits to date, I have found the site, the dig, and the archaeology beyond my imagination, enormously exciting and changing my view of our history and Irish life,’ he said.

Site: The archaeologists also uncovered the sub-floor of a circular houseThe archaeologists also uncovered the sub-floor of a circular house

‘This is the first substantial scientific excavation of a crannog in Northern Ireland. What has been found has the potential not only to be internationally important but ultimately to lead to a reassessment of life in Ulster in early Christian and medieval times.’

The site was excavated during the construction of a new road on the outskirts of Enniskillen. Mr Attwood placed a temporary exclusion zone on the area to facilitate the dig, which is due to finish at the end of December.

Dr John O’Keeffe, principal inspector of historical monuments with the Department of the Environment, explained that the site is right in the middle of the proposed route of the Cherrymount Link Road.

He said all the remains from the dig site would have been removed before construction work advanced.

‘By the time the archaeological work is  finished the site will not be here anymore,’ he said. Dr O’Keeffe said scientific advances made in the 140 years since the last time a crannog was excavated in the north had facilitated a greater understanding of life in such a  settlement.

‘It has enabled us to find out much more about diet, economy, agriculture and social structures here,’ he  said.

The expert said many of the finds had been  unexpected and were similar to those unearthed at Viking sites in Dublin and  York.

fine-tooth comb: The objects found indicate that people were very sophisticated in their tastes, say expertsThe objects found indicate that people  were very sophisticated in their tastes, say experts
This bronze pin was one of the finds hailed as internationally significant, claiming they shed new light on life in medieval Ireland and its connection with the wider worldThis bronze pin was one of the finds hailed as internationally significant, claiming they shed new light on life in medieval Ireland and its connection with the wider world

Some of the wooden artifacts have survived 1,000 years or more as a result of being submerged in water.

The settlement at the crannog has provided new evidence of living conditions in medieval Ireland.

It shows people lived in houses that would have been little bigger than a large modern living room, cooking and sleeping in the same space.

The walls were insulated with heather and other plants.

The objects found indicate that people were very sophisticated in their tastes, living as farming families, butchering their own animals and ploughing the land for crops.

They were very skilled at metalworking and woodworking, excelling at carpentry to construct the houses and crafting and decorating wooden containers of all sizes.

They played board games probably around the  fire on cold evenings. They wove their own cloth, having spun the wool from their own sheep.

‘Archaeology is a fragile and finite  resource,’ said Mr Attwood.

The finds were made in a dig near Enniskillen in Northern IrelandThe finds were made in a dig near Enniskillen in Northern Ireland

‘Once sites such as this have disappeared, we can never get them back again. Such sites have the ability to teach us a great deal and we owe it to future generations to rescue and to safeguard what we can.

‘It will further enrich the fascinating fabric of our history and I am sure bring even more tourists to our shores.  Anyone who visits will simply have an unprecedented opportunity to  see how our forefathers lived and to see history revealed before our very eyes.’

The minister added: ‘This is why I felt the need to open this spectacular excavation to the public.

The Drumclay Crannog open day will comprise a series of talks that will take place at the Fermanagh County Museum, followed by a guided tour of the archaeological site.

Attribution: Daily Mail