No Restraint in Massive Republican Spending Bill

from IBD:

The Worst Part Of The GOP’s Massive $1.3 Trillion Spending Bill Is What’s Not In It

Some Republicans are complaining that they don’t know what’s in the massive $1.3 trillion “omnibus” spending bill they will be voting on this week. But it’s what’s not in the bill that’s the most troubling.

Republicans used to love to tout around copies of ObamaCare, pointing out how its massive size — around 2,300 pages — was a sign of runaway government.

The spending bill Congress will approve this week is nearly as big, weighing in at 2,232 pages. And, like ObamaCare, no one who votes on it will have read the bill before casting their ballots.

Then there’s the amount of money we’re talking about. That $1.3 trillion is what will be spent in just the next six months. And it’s represents just a fraction of what the government will spend, since it doesn’t include Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, ObamaCare or welfare. read more

What Happened to Sean “Penny Plan” Hannity

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

Scroll Down for Audio Version

This upsets me, but if we are to remain true to conservative ideals, we must be prepared to call those who appear to have abandoned them.

In early July, 2011, U.S. Representative for Florida’s 14th congressional district, Cornelius Harvey McGillicuddy (cool name), better known as Connie Mack IV, introduced a government spending plan called the Mack Penny Plan.

Mack served in Congress from 2004-2013.

More precisely, Mack Penny was a plan to cut government spending. Unlike virtually all things in government, his plan was quite simple. For every dollar of proposed spending, the plan would take away one penny of spending. So instead of the government spending that dollar, they would receive 99 cents to spend. See – simple.

In August of that year, FreedomWorks wrote that, “The Penny Plan would require Congress to cut just one penny out of each dollar it spends every year for six years. These gradual cuts over the next six years will balance the federal budget.”

If it were enacted it would have, “capped Overall Spending at 18 Percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Starting in Fiscal Year 2018, Reduce Overall Federal Spending by $7.5 trillion over the Next Ten Years, Would Balance the Federal Budget by 2019 and End Washington’s Unprecedented Spending Spree.” read more

Spendthrift House & Senate

from the American Spectator:

Sometimes posturing proves bad for posture. Standing for eight hours in four-inch heels strikes as just one of those times.

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi grandstanded on immigration in the well of the House of Representatives on Wednesday. The media hailed the lengthy harangue as unprecedented. But surely this comes as not the first time a preachy liberal promised to take just one minute of your time only to conclude the lecture eight hours later. read more

Limbaugh’s Thoughts on the latest Budget Agreement

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

Listening to Rush Limbaugh on Friday had me confused. He’s always been the voice of the right, giving voice to our thoughts. But it appears since this past presidential election, at least to me, that he is putting the voice of Trump and his supporters ahead of what we knew he has always been – a no-nonsense, small government, frugal conservative.

He has always been the man we could count on to hold everyone accountable for their actions and votes, if they happened to veer away from espoused conservative principles.

Yet Rush doesn’t appear to me to ever be critical of the President, even as Trump signs onto a massive spending increase or offers up amnesty to millions.

I discuss all of this rather uncomfortable topic. And believe me – I hate doing it. read more

Government Knows Only One Thing – How to Spend

from Constitution.com:

Rand Paul is Right – Paul Ryan’s Bi-Partisan Budget Deal is a Disaster

Apparently, fiscal conservatism is dead. Long live spending without consequences and uncontrollably ballooning deficits.
Early Friday morning (around 4 am), Congress passed Paul Ryan’s bi-partisan budget deal that will stave off another government shutdown for at least the next two years.

It was an unexpected nail-biter: After a short “technical” shutdown, Congress early Friday passed a measure that would raise spending levels by $300 billion over the next two years. read more

Right and Left Just Keep on Spending

from Rand Paul for the Washington Examiner:

Sen. Rand Paul: The debt and the decline of empire

I ran into a couple of GOP senators the other day. They were talking about the fall of the Roman Empire (who knew senators might actually discuss history?). One senator made the point that Rome’s fall corresponded with a loss of values, which of course has some merit. But that’s missing the bigger picture. I responded that perhaps their decline had something to do with being overextended militarily, knowing that they would likely reject this point since it might imply that the United States, also, might be faced with the same future.

History certainly has lessons, but it’s amazing that after 2,000 years we still draw different conclusions. I couldn’t resist to jab them a little: “You know our own decline will ultimately come when we can’t manage our debt.”

read more

No Talk of Government Cutting Back

from The Blaze:

Republicans and Democrats open 2018 by arguing over how much to grow the size of government

As the holiday season comes to a close, Republicans and Democrats are opening the new year by resuming debate over a measure to fund the government through the end of 2018. The two sides failed to reach a compromise before the end of the year on such thorny issues as protection for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients and funding for a wall on the southern border. But in addition to these sticking points, the two sides also appear to disagree over exactly how much the government should grow. read more

What Good is the Debt Ceiling?

from IBD: 

In his surprise deal with the Democrats to raise the debt ceiling last week, President Trump went one step further: He proposed getting rid of the debt ceiling entirely. It’s not a bad idea, but only if you control future spending.

“The president encouraged congressional leaders to find a more permanent solution to the debt ceiling so the vote is not so frequently politicized,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Her comments came as the Senate voted 80 to 17 to approve the deal that would raise the debt ceiling and keep the government running until Dec. 8, while spending $15.25 billion on emergency relief. read more

Want to See Betrayal? – Here It Is

from Conservative Review:

During the 2014 elections in my home state of Maryland, there were problems with some of the ballot machines, whereby many ballots cast for Republicans “coincidentally” were automatically rendered as Democrat ballots. With the omnibus deal forged at 2 a.m. last night in Congress, this is essentially what has happened on a national level.

People voted for a revolution – to drain the swamp – and out popped a Democrat budget. In fact, one would be hard pressed to find anything different about this budget from the one we would have gotten if Hillary had been elected. read more

So Why Are We Always Broke?

by: the Common Constitutionalist

A new report appears to show bad news on the financial front  as “the federal budget deficit this year will increase in relationship to the overall size of the economy for the first time since 2009 and continue to grow over the coming decade.” The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that the deficit will grow by an additional $105 billion, totaling $544 billion for 2016.

In August the same CBO estimated the 2016 deficit to be around $414 billion. Still a lot but nowhere near the revised estimate. So what happened between then and now? Simple – a republican sanctioned shopping spree to the tune of an additional $2 trillion in December. Remember that? Oh sure, republicans say they are also instituting spending cuts, but there aren’t.

Now, in the grand scheme of things, whether we add $400 or $500 billion of deficit spending, the difference won’t make a hill of beans worth of difference. Not with a debt load of around $20 trillion and unfunded mandates approaching a quarter of a quadrillion dollars. That’s a two, a five and 13 zeros. What’s a few hundred billion?

It is potentially so bad that the CBO says, “The likelihood of a fiscal crisis in the United States would increase” without appropriate action,” the CBO study said. “There would be a greater risk that investors would become unwilling to finance the government’s borrowing needs unless they were compensated with very high interest rates; if that happened, interest rates on federal debt would rise suddenly and sharply.” read more