Kim Jong-un and the D.C. Swamp may Suffer from the Same Affliction

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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I was reading an article posted at Conservative Review. It was entitled, “A little Hayek could go a long way in the bathroom debate.” It was regarding the Dysphoria of transgenderism sweeping the nation and how government thinks it can just mandate policies that contradict human nature.

Within the piece, the author, Nate Madden, writes that, “As the whole [transgender] debate drags on, it is becoming clearer and clearer that the trans-bathroom debate is a ripe one for Hayek’s theory of local knowledge. Long story short, Hayek contends in his essay ‘The Use of Knowledge in Society,’ nobody on earth possesses all the knowledge necessary to centrally plan a society or an economy.”

“The knowledge of the circumstances of which we must make use never exists in concentrated or integrated form,” explains Hayek, “but solely as the dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge which all the separate individuals possess.”

In other words, as Madden explains – the further the decision makers are from the things it has chosen to decide on, the worse the decisions get.

This got me to thinking about centralized planning, or centralized authority as a whole – that it is not only being far afield from any given situation, but also, and possibly more importantly, being shielded from the individuals and communities their decisions effect. read more