It’s Not July 4th, It’s Independence Day

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

On July 2, 1776, George Washington sent general orders to his officers explaining the war effort:

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their Houses, and Farms, are to be pillaged and destroyed, and they consigned to a State of Wretchedness from which no human efforts will probably deliver them.

The fate of unborn Millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us no choice but a brave resistance, or the most abject submission; this is all we can expect. We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die. Our own Country’s Honor all call upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. read more

Independence Day Presidential Passings Marked by Divine Providence

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

Scroll Down for Audio Version

There were five Founding Fathers who became president. Some would say that no – in fact there were six. What about John Quincy Adams? Was he not a founder? No – no he wasn’t. He was the son of second President John Adams, but was only a child of the Revolution.

The five, in order, where of course George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe.

It was Divine Providence that brought all these great men together at this exact place and this exact time in history. It was through acts of Divine Providence that the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were crafted and signed. It was Divine Providence that assisted in the founding of our nation. And it was Divine Providence that God put his final stamp on the founding of the United States, with the passing of three of the five Founder Presidents on the day of America’s declared Independence. And, save for just six days, it could have been four. Actually, I suppose, it wouldn’t be a stretch to really say it was four. read more

WND Exclusive – A DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCY

It was May of 1775, and the second Continental Congress met for the first time. Growing weary of King George III’s utter lack of attention toward the petition to redress grievances sent by the first Continental Congress, the colonists decided to act.

In June of that year the Congress developed a currency separate of the crown. They also established the first Continental Army, calling themselves the “United Colonies.”

Getting word of the colonies’ seditious behavior, the king declared that the American colonists were “engaged in open and avowed rebellion.” The British Parliament passed the “American Prohibitory Act” later that year, which instituted a naval blockade of all American ports and halted the colonies’ trade with the world and among each other. read more