My WND Weekly Exclusive

Let’s Treat Government Like a Sporting Event

Can anyone honestly say that a President Trump would accept not pushing some agenda item he really wanted because it just happened to be unconstitutional?

No, of course not. He would charge his legal team, as Obama does, with finding other historic yet unconstitutional precedents and point to those as justification for his actions. Or like past presidents, just make it up or ignore the document completely. read more

Football and Politics

by: the Common Constitutionalist 

Imagine if you will, it is the day after the Super Bowl. Oh, that’s right, it is. Now imagine that the Broncos beat the Seahawks rather handily. Hopefully that will not actually happen. Go Seahawks!

UPDATE: Okay. Now that we know the outcome, the following sounds a bit absurd, but the moral of the story remains.

 

The scene is set for the morning after press conferences. And now let’s hear what some of the games losers had to say. We take you now to the Seattle Seahawks. First up – Coach Pete Carroll. “Thank you all for being here. I have a short prepare statement and will take no questions. First, I don’t think Coach Fox of the Broncos played by the rules. Second, it was the decision of me and my coaching staff not to fight hard in this game. That’s not what the American people wanted to see. We thought it more important to compromise with the Broncos staff and allow them score at will. But I say here and now. Wait until the next time we meet. We will surely make a stand and win the game. Thank you.”

 

“Um… Okay. Next up – the always outspoken Seahawks cornerback – Richard Sherman.” read more

It’s Just Kicking a Ball

You may have seen this one already. Almost 1.5 million people have. It is especially impressive if you have an appreciation of how difficult it is to accurately kick a football. Just watch the kickers of the NFL to witness their inconsistency. They make a lot of money to do nothing but kick but I doubt any NFL kicker could do what this Norwegian kid can. Heck, I’ve seen plenty of quarterbacks without his accuracy.

Ban Football?

by: the Common Constitutionalist

I was listening to Rush Limbaugh’s radio program a month or two ago. He was discussing the NFL, football in general, concussions and other injuries. The crux of his monologue was his claim that, due to injuries, within a decade or two, there will be no more football.

People called in to his program saying he was crazy. The NFL, after all, is not only wildly popular, but a veritable money-making machine for all involved. No one in their right mind would ever try to put the brakes on that gravy train.

As Rush often says, “Don’t doubt me”.

Well, I for one, do not doubt him. His track record is very good. He claims to know liberals better than they know themselves. As he puts it rather ingloriously, “I know liberals as well as I know my own glorious naked body”. Scary thought, I know.  Try not to dwell on that.

Liberals are really quite predictable. They are all Nannies at heart. They don’t think, they feel. They feel somehow better equipped to solve the worlds problems than us conservatives, that “something” always must be done. Liberals are also the kings of the knee-jerk reaction and contradiction.

If they see something they don’t like, unlike a conservative, who can simply avoid it, the liberal must stop it, ban it or shut it down.

Of course the liberal must employ the government to do their bidding. The government is the only entity large enough and with enough authority to demand society cease whatever behavior or product the liberal finds so offensive.

It always happens the same way. It begins small with a “concerned citizen” suggesting to a local politician that something should be regulating. The politician, seeing a golden opportunity, provides a knee-jerk law or regulation. Maybe not enough motorists are wearing seatbelts, or helmets, or car seats. Second hand smoke, salt, sugar, trans fats are all killing us. “Do it for the children”, they exclaim. If it saves just one life, it will be worth it (except for abortion). Herein also lies the contradiction, or paradox. One example is cigarette smoking. The liberal desperately needs the tax revenue from smokers to fund their silly government programs but yet they call for regulations virtually banning the product.

Then “science” or “medicine” is employed, proving the “concerned citizen” right. It could be faux-science (global warming), but that matters not. As long as it advances the agenda and the agenda is always for our own good. Liberals care more than we do, so we couldn’t very well be left to fend for ourselves. What do we think this is, a free society?

Before you know it, there has been a state law passed, regulating this or that and finally an overarching federal law.

It’s always the same tune, just with different lyrics.

That brings us full circle, back to football. Even I was surprised how fast this has progressed.

When Limbaugh predicts something, it usually takes years for society to catch up.

Don’t Doubt Him!

(I live in New Hampshire, so don’t doubt me when I say, Dover is a liberal stronghold. I don’t know what their “Nannies per capita” are, but it’s up there.)

DOVER, N.H. (AP) — A proposal to drop football at one New Hampshire school district has surprised and upset many residents.

The idea was suggested at a Dover School Board meeting Monday night by board member Paul Butler, a retired physician.

Butler said the potential for concussions is too great of a risk. He said concussions on developing brains can have a long-lasting impact, including the possibility of brain damage, depression and dementia.

Butler said he knows stopping the game isn’t popular.

“I suspect it’s going to take a long time. This might be the first volley. It took a long time for people to wear bicycle helmets. It took a long time for people to stop smoking,” he said.

The board later released a statement that Butler’s comments were his reaction to various studies he’s read and is not the opinion of the board itself. It said termination of the high school football program isn’t on the agenda at this time.

Dover Athletic Director Peter Wotton said safer tackling is being coached and players are being supervised by doctors.

“Any sport is a target, because it feel like anytime you put kids in motion — there is an inherent risk to playing sports and taking part in athletics, and for some reason the target is on football. I don’t think it should be on anything,” he said.

Wotton said girls basketball ranked higher in concussions in 2011.

A new law in New Hampshire is aimed at protecting student athletes from concussions and other head injuries. Under the law, coaches and other athletic officials who suspect that an athlete has suffered a concussion will be required to remove him or her from play immediately, and the athlete will have to get written authorization from a health care provider and a parent before returning.

Information about such injuries also will be distributed to all youth athletes each year, and parents will have to sign forms indicating they had read the information before the start of practice or competition.

And so it begins. Don’t Doubt Him!

NFL Rules Updates

From Alex Marvez of Fox Sports

The NFL’s traditional “sudden death” overtime format died a sudden death Wednesday at the league’s annual owners meeting in Palm Beach, Fla.

NFL owners voted to adopt the same overtime rules for the regular season that are used for the postseason.

The team that loses the overtime coin toss is now guaranteed a possession provided the club that won the toss doesn’t score a touchdown on its opening drive.

The NFL instituted the postseason overtime rule during the 2010 offseason following the 2009 NFC Championship Game between the Minnesota Vikings and New Orleans Saints. The Saints won the overtime coin toss and drove for the game-winning field goal on their first possession.

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and members of the NFL’s competition committee believed too many teams were enjoying an unfair competitive advantage by winning the overtime coin toss and proceeding to score without the coin-toss loser receiving at least one possession

The playoff overtime rule came into play for the first time in last season’s first-round game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Denver Broncos. Because the Broncos scored a touchdown on their opening possession, Pittsburgh’s offense never got to take the field in OT.

The NFL also voted to make review of turnovers by the instant replay booth automatic rather than requiring head coaches to use one of their two challenges. Reviewable plays include interceptions, fumbles, backward passes recovered by an opponent or those that travel out of bounds through an opponent’s end zone, and muffed scrimmage kicks recovered by the kicking team.

A rule proposal advocating that all challenged calls get reviewed by the replay booth rather than the on-field referee didn’t pass. Horse-collar tackles on quarterbacks in the pocket are also still permitted. NFL competition committee chairman Rich McKay pointed to the fact such plays are rare and might not be preventable considering the unpredictable nature of tackling that happens during a pass rush.

“We just didn’t think this had an impact on player safety,” McKay said Wednesday morning after the vote was announced.

Other proposed rules changes that passed after receiving votes from at least 24 of 32 NFL owners:

• The banning of “crack-back” blocks on defensive players aligned more than two yards laterally outside an offensive tackle at the snap. This was aimed at improving player safety.

• Being caught with more than 11 players on the field before the snap becoming a dead-ball foul rather than a five-yard penalty that would be enforced after the play was run and time taken off the clock. This is to fill a rules loophole that was exposed during Super Bowl XLVI, when the New York Giants fielded 12 defensive players during a last-minute New England Patriots drive. There was a concern that coaches would begin illegally fielding extra defensive players to preserve a lead if there were no ramifications on the game clock.

• Illegally kicking a loose football becoming a loss-of-down penalty.

Proposed rules changes tabled for further discussion until the NFL’s spring meeting in May in Buckhead, Ga.:

• The addition of a game-by-game roster exemption for one player who has suffered a concussion and is not cleared to play. This would allow greater flexibility for clubs to sign short-term replacements without adversely affecting the roster. It also may lessen pressure on concussed players to return to the field prematurely.

• The ability to bring one designated player off injured reserve during the season after a minimum eight-week recovery period. All players currently placed on injured reserve are prevented from returning for that team during the season.

• The rescheduling of the NFL trade deadline from six to eight weeks into the regular season. The extension was designed to give teams greater flexibility to swing deals, especially those in playoff contention seeking to replace injured players or upgrade their rosters. Clubs that are out of the playoff race also might be more likely to begin early housecleaning before the offseason begins.

• The expansion of training-camp rosters from 80 to 90 players. Although the regular-season roster will remain at 53 players, one of the rule’s intents is to allow teams to better scout reserve talent that could serve as in-season injury replacements. Starters and key backups also would potentially receive less preseason wear-and-tear if more substitutes were available during practice