Europe Is Paying for the Mistakes of the Past

by: the Common Constitutionalist

We are well aware of the many ISIS or ISIS inspired attacks throughout Europe. It is interesting that since the rise of ISIS, these attacks appeared directed at the European infidels and not just the long-proclaimed enemy of Islam – Israel.

Not that there are continuing attacks on the Jewish state – there are as there have always been. But recently they have taken a backseat to the mass carnage inflicted upon Europe and the United States by the Islamic State.

But why? Hasn’t it always been the number one cause of Muslims to avenge the oppression of the poor displaced Palestinians and drive the Jews out of Israel and into the sea? Has that not been the clarion call of all Muslims since 1948?

Heck, even individual European nations as well as the EU have, for want of a better term, conspired with Muslim nations and terrorist organizations to take down Israel.

For decades, “Europe had a cushy arrangement – all the world’s jihadists were so fixated on Israel that they were willing to overlook long-standing hatreds against ‘Crusader’ Europe, as long as Europe would help them wage war on Israel.” read more

Renewable Disaster

I’ll remind you; if you wish to see our future, just gaze across the pond.

It’s not the floods or any other natural disaster.

It’s a self-inflicted disaster, caused by trying to cut CO2 emissions 80% by 2050.

Even Germany is beginning to realize that it can’t continue to support renewable energy.

The accompanying chart shows that the cost of electricity is far higher in Europe than in the United States.

EU vs US costs for electricity and natural gas. From the Economist Magazine

This disparity in the cost of electricity can only get worse if Europe continues with its current low-carbon obsession. The German Association of Energy and Water (BDEW), for example, predicts that electricity prices will increase another 25%. “Thomas Vahlenkamp of McKinsey reckons that the cost of the Energiewende will double over the next decade.1

Continue Reading

Ostentatious Europe

They were once filled with courtiers, kings, and other members of the aristocracy. But stunning images capture the silent galleries, corridors, and libraries of Europe in a whole new light.

Captured by Italian photographer Massimo Listri, the images span from Portugal to Sweden, France, and Italy, and show the intricate masterworks from ages past.

His images evoke a certain solemnity, both beautiful and isolating at once.

Included in his portfolio are pictures from the library of Wiblingen Abbey, which was once a Benedictine abbey and has since been transformed into housing medical facilities for the University of Ulm in Germany.

Another image shows the the Malatestiana Library, located in Cesena, Italy, which was the first European civil library that allowed everyone -including the common people – access to its books.

Sounds of silence: These images of grand halls have been captured by Italian photographer Massimo Listri; here, the Royal Palace of Stockholm in SwedenSounds of silence: These images of grand halls have been captured by Italian photographer Massimo Listri; here, the Royal Palace of Stockholm in Sweden
Royalty: Another vast room from the Royal Palace in Stockholm; the Swedish monarchy still resides here todayRoyalty: Another vast room from the Royal Palace in Stockholm; the Swedish monarchy still resides here today
 
Rococo: The Queluz National Palace in Lisbon, Portugal was built in the 18th century; the grand checkered marble floors are juxtaposed against a chandelier and and painted murals on the ceilingRococo: The Queluz National Palace in Lisbon, Portugal was built in the 18th century; the grand checkered marble floors are juxtaposed against a chandelier and and painted murals on the ceiling

WiblingenRoom with a view: Wiblingen Abbey, once a Benedictine abbey, has since been transformed into housing medical facilities for the University of Ulm in Germany; this is a stunning shot of the abbey’s beautiful library

Monochrome: One of two Medici Chapels, located in the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence, Italy; the structure dates to around the 16th century Monochrome: One of two Medici Chapels, located in the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence, Italy; the structure dates to around the 16th century

All made of marble: The Marble Gallery in the Ducal Palace in Northern Italy is a hauntingly beautiful reminder of times gone byAll made of marble: The Marble Gallery in the Ducal Palace in Northern Italy is a hauntingly beautiful reminder of times gone by

From antiquity: The Malatestiana Library, located in Cesena, Italy, was the first European civil library, allowing everyone access to its books, and is more than 500 years oldFrom antiquity: The Malatestiana Library, located in Cesena, Italy, was the first European civil library, allowing everyone access to its books, and is more than 500 years old
Less austere: This room in the Palazzo Martelli in Florence shows a painted mural on the wall, but a room void of furniture, save for one lone wooden tableLess austere: This room in the Palazzo Martelli in Florence shows a painted mural on the wall, but a room void of furniture, save for one lone wooden table
Roman holiday: This is a corridor from the Capitoline Museums, located in Capitoline Hill in Rome; part of the piazza was thought of by none other than famed Renaissance artist Michelangelo Roman holiday: This is a corridor from the Capitoline Museums, located in Capitoline Hill in Rome; part of the piazza was thought of by none other than famed Renaissance artist Michelangelo
Hollywood aspirations: A room from the Chateau de Pierrefonds in Oise, France, north of Paris; it later became a filming location for the 1998 film Man In The Iron MaskHollywood aspirations: A room from the Chateau de Pierrefonds in Oise, France, north of Paris; it later became a filming location for the 1998 film Man In The Iron Mask
Wealth of knowledge: The stunning library from Kresmunster Abbey in Austria was built in the late 1600s, though the abbey's history predates the 9th centuryWealth of knowledge: The stunning library from Kresmunster Abbey in Austria was built in the late 1600s, though the abbey’s history predates the 9th century
Intricate: Sammezzano Castle, built in 1605, is in the scenic Tuscany region of Italy and features Moorish designs throughoutIntricate: Sammezzano Castle, built in 1605, is in the scenic Tuscany region of Italy and features Moorish designs throughout
Wide halls: The Palace of Caserta, located in southern Italy, was built for the kings of Naples, and has the honour of being one of the largest built in Europe during the 18th century Wide halls: The Palace of Caserta, located in southern Italy, was built for the kings of Naples, and has the honour of being one of the largest built in Europe during the 18th century
Other-worldly: The Gallery Grande is part of the Palace of Venaria, located in Turin, Italy, built in the later part of the 17th century; the stark contrast and diffused light gives it a ghostly glowOther-worldly: The Gallery Grande is part of the Palace of Venaria, located in Turin, Italy, built in the later part of the 17th century; the stark contrast and diffused light gives it a ghostly glow
 
Trade paths: The General Archive of the Indies, in Seville, Spain, was built in the 1570s; a lone cannon lays on the floor of the arched libraryTrade paths: The General Archive of the Indies, in Seville, Spain, was built in the 1570s; a lone cannon lays on the floor of the arched library

I Can’t Believe it’s not Butter

by: the Common Constitutionalist

The great Norwegian butter shortage! Yes, it’s true. Norway has a shortage of butter.

Stores in Norway are seeing long lines of people waiting to buy butter; a sight that Europe hasn’t seen since the fall of Communism.

The shortfall is estimated at between 500 to 1000 tons. That’s a lot of Butter.

Prices of a pack of butter, weighing around a half a kilo (500 grams), a little more than a pound, are being driven out of sight. Some online sellers are asking up to 350 Euros (about $465.00) for 1 pack.

Sheeesh! Can you say Weimar Republic revisited?

But why the shortage?

Some have blamed it on the unusually wet summer that drove yields down. Some others have said it is the new Norway. It’s citizens are opting for lower carb, higher fat diets, which has increased demand recently. They both sound like reasonable explanations on the surface, but we’re not about the surface.

Let’s take a closer look.

Norway is a socialist country. You know, like we aspire to be.

Currently, in America, there are too many butter producers to name. In Norway, there is effectively, ONE. That wouldn’t pose a problem, would it?

Tine Company is the producer of over 90% of all butter in Norway. The Norwegian government granted that monopoly to it. Remember, monopolies are bad unless the government says they’re not.

Evidently, Tine has done a pretty fair job of butter production until now. Maybe it’s that wet summer thing. Nope, that’s not it. Right next door is Sweden. They have butter out the wazoo and their summer was wetter than Norway’s.

Well, if Sweden has all that butter, perhaps Norway could just import it until they catch up? Unfortunately, tariffs are so high, that it makes imports virtually impossible. BUY NORWEGIAN! Look for the Norwegian label. Everybody sing!

This is how socialism works. First, the government takes control of production. Next, they pick a winner, say Tine. Then they tax the heck out of any foreign company trying to import to them. All the government has to do after that, is dictate how much the producer can make & what price it is to be sold.

Then they all just sit back & watch the experiment fail, as it always does.

With any luck, the people eventually figure out the great experiment isn’t working & they demand change. Well, they’re going to get it. Unfortunately it will only be temporary.

The government has decided to take drastic measures and has cut import tariffs by more than 80 percent until the end of March. It has also lifted milk quotas for domestic farmers that were in place to avoid overproduction in the market. Overproduction does not appear to be their problem. After that, everything goes back to the way it was, where centralized planners cannot react to fluctuations in the marketplace. By the way, Importers are not allowed to sell their products for less than the government dictates.

So that’s a lesson in socialism. Sounds great, eh?