DOES ‘GM’ STAND FOR ‘GOVERNMENT MANDATE’?

by: Brent Smith for World Net Daily:

By her own admission, the CEO of General Motors wants to further her pursuit into crony-corporatism to achieve her vision of an all-electric, zero-emissions future.

There is something inherently wrong with the term crony-corporatism – although most use the term crony-capitalism.

There really isn’t anything capitalistic about cronyism. And there isn’t anything inherently wrong with corporatism. In both cases, the problem is “crony.”

For those unfamiliar, crony-corporatism is when a private-sector corporation gets in bed with the government. It may be federal or state, but in either case (or both), the corporation curries favor with the government, seeking special carve-outs and regulations that effectively lock out their competition. It’s an insidious relationship that benefits none but the corporation and government special interests. The consumer always suffers in the end. read more

My WND Weekly Exclusive

ELECTRIC CARS: ANOTHER IDIOTIC GOV’T MANDATE

About a month ago, Elon Musk announced Tesla’s release of the Model 3 – an affordable Tesla, the all-electric car that is supposed to revolutionize the electric car market, because it’s an electric that doesn’t look like one.

The “greenies” have been all atwitter over it, as if this zero-emission vehicle will mark the beginning of the end of the polluting gas-powered car.

Whether it will or won’t (and it won’t) is almost immaterial, because governments are already proposing bans on gas- and diesel-powered vehicles. read more

The Volt needs a Jolt

Reuters: GM Is Losing Nearly $50K on Each Electric Volt

by:  at the Blaze

General Motors posts a $49,000 loss for each new Volt plug-in hybrid it produces, Reuters reports.

You know what this means, right? It means that for each new Chevy Volt, the taxpayer bailed out company loses what the average American makes in a year.

And on top of that, rock bottom lease offers made during the summer may have inflated the above number. According to the report, some motorists paid only $5K to drive around in a new $80K Volt for two years. Oh, yeah, and Volt production has been put on hold at GM’s Detroit-Hamtramck plant.

What we’re trying to say is that it will be a very, very long time (if ever) before GM makes a profit on the Volt.

The problem with the car is that “the Volt is over-engineered and over-priced,” according to Dennis Virag, president of the Michigan-based Automotive Consulting Group.

But hey! If it’s any consolation to GM, Nissan, Honda and Mitsubishi are all having a hard time marketing their electric and hybrid models as well. But even that minor bit of consolation disappears when you consider the fact that Toyota has had great success with its Prius model (meaning it’s possible to have a successful electric-hybrid).

“GM’s quandary is how to increase sales volume so that it can spread its estimated $1.2-billion investment in the Volt over more vehicles while reducing manufacturing and component costs — which will be difficult to bring down until sales increase,” the Reuters report reads.

“But the Volt’s steep $39,995 base price and its complex technology — the car uses expensive lithium-polymer batteries, sophisticated electronics and an electric motor combined with a gasoline engine — have kept many prospective buyers away from Chevy showrooms,” the report adds.

But more than just steep prices, many Americans simply prefer a car that gets better mileage and has the infrastructure in place to help charge and maintain it.

“It’s true, we’re not making money yet” on the Volt, Doug Parks, GM’s vice president of global product programs and the former Volt development chief, told Reuters in an interview. The Volt “eventually will make money. As the volume comes up and we get into the Gen 2 car, we’re going to turn (the losses) around,” he added.

But some analysts disagree with Parks.

“I don’t see how General Motors will ever get its money back on that vehicle,” said Sandy Munro, president of Michigan-based Munro & Associates, which specializes in vehicular analysis.

It currently costs GM “at least” $74K to produce the Volt, including development costs, Munro added.

“That’s nearly twice the base price of the Volt before a $7,500 federal tax credit provided as part of President Barack Obama’s green energy policy,” Reuters notes.

Again, as stated earlier in this article, with these type of costs tied into the vehicle’s production, it may be a very, very long time (if ever) before GM sees a profit on the Volt.