Podcast – Children of ExxonMobil are Wracked with Guilt – Saudi Rehab Centers Recruit Jihadists – Czech Man Thinks he’s a Tiger

Two of descendants of John D. Rockefeller, the founder of Standard Oil, now ExxonMobil, are evidently guilty about their family legacy. So guilty are they over their dirty Big Oil legacy, that they are calling out the company, stating that ExxonMobil has downplayed the effect that oil drilling has had on Global Warming – because that’s what guilty rich liberals do.

Obama has been releasing terrorists from the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, so he might finally fulfill his promise to close the facility and further his radical legacy. Some of those released have been sent to a rehabilitation center in Saudi Arabia. However this rehab center appears to be a front for recruiting jihadists.

Don’t do drugs! If you do, you may begin to think you are a wild animal, like a young man in the Czech Republic, who was caught on video by a trail camera, completely naked. He thought he was a Tiger. read more

Live to 150 Years Old?

New drug being developed using compound found in red wine ‘could help humans live until they are 150

Drugs that could combat aging and help people to live to 150-years-old may be available within five years, following landmark research.

The new drugs are synthetic versions of resveratrol which is found in red wine and is believed to have an anti-ageing effect as it boosts activity of a protein called SIRT1.

Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline has been testing the medications on patients suffering with medical conditions including cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

The work proves that a single anti-ageing enzyme in the body can be targeted, with the potential to prevent age-related diseases and extend lifespans.

As each of the 117 drugs tested work on the single enzyme through a common mechanism, it means that a whole new class of anti-aging drugs is now viable, which could ultimately prevent cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes.

Genetics professor David Sinclair, based at Harvard University, said: ‘Ultimately, these drugs would treat one disease, but unlike drugs of today, they would prevent 20 others.

‘In effect, they would slow ageing.’

The target enzyme, SIRT1, is switched on naturally by calorie restriction and exercise, but it can also be enhanced through activators.

The most common naturally-occurring activator is resveratrol, which is found in small quantities in red wine, but synthetic activators with much stronger activity are already being developed.

Although research surrounding resveratrol has been going on for a decade, until now the basic science had been contested.

Despite this, there have already been promising results in some trials with implications for cancer, cardiovascular disease and cardiac failure, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, fatty liver disease, cataracts, osteoporosis, muscle wasting, sleep disorders and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, arthritis and colitis.

Professor Sinclair said: ‘In the history of pharmaceuticals, there has never been a drug that tweaks an enzyme to make it run faster.’

Positive: Scientists have been testing the medications on patients suffering with medical conditions including cancer, diabetes and heart disease (file picture)
 Scientists have been testing the medications on patients suffering with medical conditions including cancer, diabetes and heart disease (file picture)

The technology was sold to GlaxoSmithKline in 2008.

Four thousand synthetic activators, which are 100 times as potent as a single glass of red wine, have been developed – with the best three being used in human trials.

Writing in the journal Science, Professor Sinclair, who suggests the first therapeutic to be marketed will be for diabetes, said: ‘Our drugs can mimic the benefits of diet and exercise, but there is no impact on weight.’

Limited trials have been carried out in people with type 2 diabetes and the skin inflammatory disease, psoriasis.

Scientists found that there were benefits to the metabolism in the first group and a reduction in skin redness in the second.

The drugs can be administered orally, or topically.

So far, there have been no drugs developed to target ageing skin, but one major skin care range has developed a creme with resveratrol in it.

Anti-aging: Drugs to target ageing skin have not yet been developed, but one major skin care range has created a creme containing resveratrol
 Drugs to target ageing skin have not yet been developed, but one major skin care range has created a creme containing resveratrol

While any drug would be strictly prescribed for certain conditions, Professor Sinclair suggests that one day, they could be taken orally as a preventative.

They could therefore be used in the same way as statin drugs are commonly prescribed to prevent, instead of simply treating, cardiovascular disease.

In animal models, overweight mice given synthetic resveratrol were able to run twice as far as slim mice and they lived 15 per cent longer.

Professor Sinclair added: ‘Now we are looking at whether there are benefits for those who are already healthy.

‘Things there are also looking promising. We’re finding that aging isn’t the irreversible affliction that we thought it was.

‘Some of us could live to 150, but we won’t get there without more research.’

Attribution: Lucy Crossley, Daily Mail

Cures What Ails Ya

It’s not a drug known for its benefits to health. In fact, if you were caught with this class A substance and claimed it was for ‘medicinal purposes’ you’d probably be laughed at all the way to the police station.

But, bizarrely, cocaine – and other drugs like morphine – were routinely used in remedies for coughs, colds and toothaches as a cure-all magic ingredient in the Victorian era.

Long before the drugs were criminalized – and prior to the regulation of both medicine and advertising – the substances were frequently touted as effective treatments for illnesses as serious as cancer and liver disease.

 
Inappropriate: An advert for cocaine toothache drops, marketed at children, which cost just 15 cents in 1885 
 
An advert for Mrs Winslow's Soothing Syrup, a patent medicine of the late 19th century which contained morphine, and was used as a cure for teething troubles in infants
 advert for Mrs Winslow’s Soothing Syrup, a patent medicine of the late 19th century which contained morphine, and was used as a cure for teething troubles in infants

These bizarre posters reveal the lethal medical concoctions containing cocaine and opium once unwittingly consumed by millions.

The quack cure advertisements – often depicting children – claimed to heal a long list of illnesses.

But the miracle cures were often loaded with substances such as cocaine, morphine and alcohol – all of which have been proven to be detrimental to our health in large doses.

Seems we’ve come a long way.

Up in smoke: An advert produced by Minnesota Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company in 1895 claiming its cigars don't damage health because they are pure and scientific  An advert produced by Minnesota Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company in 1895 claiming its cigars don’t damage health because they are pure and scientific
 
 
 
An advert from 1900s for Vin Mariani, French tonic wine made from coca leaves, a source of cocaine
A drug advert from 1891 for a kidney and liver cure from US drug company Warner
An advert from 1900s for Vin Mariani (upper), French tonic wine made from coca leaves, a source of cocaine. Pictured (lower) is a drug advert from 1891 for a kidney and liver cure from US drug company Warner.
 

Dr Seth Arnold's Cough Killer, which contained morphine, from the late 1800s was claimed to cure coughs, asthma, pneumonia, malaria and many other diseases

Dr Seth Arnold’s Cough Killer, which contained morphine, from the late 1800s was claimed to cure coughs, asthma, pneumonia, malaria and many other diseases

All the products were once readily available over the counter and millions rushed to snap them up around the world in the late 1800s.

One advert for Ozone paper urges buyers to ignite its special paper and inhale the smoke to cure their asthma and bronchitis.

While Dr Seth Arnold’s Cough Killer’s campaign showed a young girl clutching a puppy – but contained high levels of Morphine.

Another ad dating back to 1885 advertised its ‘instantaneous cure’ for toothache – using cocaine.

 
Purely ridiculous: These products from the early 1900s were advertised as a 'blood purifier' to treat cancer
Purely ridiculous: These products from the early 1900s were advertised as a ‘blood purifier’ to treat cancer
 
 
 
An advert from 1895 selling a product that makes you fat, something seen as the sign of good health before regulation was introduced
An advertisement for an anti-fat remedy, patented by the Botanic Medicine Company, Buffalo, New York, in 1878
 Weighty issue: An advert, (upper), from 1895 selling a product that makes you fat – something seen as the sign of good health- and one for weight loss,(lower), in 1878
 
An advert for Mrs Winslow's Soothing Syrup for children from the late 19th century, which contained morphine
 advert for Mrs Winslow’s Soothing Syrup for children from the late 19th century, which contained morphine

Stephen Jackson, a quack cure and medicine historian, said: ‘There were a lot of medicines before the 1900s that incorporated cocaine and alcohol, simply because they were cheap components.

‘Since nobody tested them to see if they lived up to their wild claims, companies could say and claim anything they wanted to.

‘They invested a tremendous amount of money in advertising and the public was pretty gullible. People made a tremendous amount of money around the world hawking this stuff.

‘They used a lot of alcohol in products for kidney and liver problems for example, which is the last thing you want in that situation.

Dr Scott's Electric Flesh Brush, featured in this 1881 advert, is a concept still used today. Millions use body brushes to improve circulation and skin conditionDr Scott’s Electric Flesh Brush, featured in this 1881 advert, is a concept still used today. Millions use body brushes to improve circulation and skin condition
 
 
An advert from 1912 claiming to offer treatment for female diseases and piles, which consisted mainly of cocoa butter
An advert from 1912 claiming to offer treatment for female diseases and piles, which consisted mainly of cocoa butter
 An advert from 1912 (upper) claiming to offer treatment for female diseases and piles, which consisted mainly of cocoa butter. A breast enlargement advert (lower) dating from the early 1900s
 
This tubular device claimed to cure erectile dysfunction in the 1900s. The Vital Power massager created a vacuum via a crank that supposedly increased blood flow to the penis
This tubular device claimed to cure erectile dysfunction in the 1900s. The Vital Power massager created a vacuum via a crank that supposedly increased blood flow to the penis

Shock tactics: This advertisement from 1889 shows a product that supplied patients with a continuous current of low intensity electricity for a range of health remedies

Shock tactics: This advertisement from 1889 shows a product that supplied patients with a continuous current of low intensity electricity for a range of health remedies

 
 
Vintage health clinic advertisement in a newspaper dating from the early 1900's for Dr. Flint, Chicago Rupture Specialist, an unproven proprietary or patent medicine
Vintage health clinic advertisement in a newspaper dating from the early 1900’s for Dr. Flint, Chicago Rupture Specialist, an unproven proprietary or patent medicine
 
Attribution: Daily Mail

Better Than a Moat

by: Leah Barkoukis at Townhall

Last year, President Obama turned border security into a joke when he said Republicans wouldn’t be happy until they get a moat…with alligators in it.

No, the Texas Department of Public Safety hasn’t gotten said reptile-infested moat to combat the growing problem of violent drug cartels crossing into the U.S. via the Rio Grande. They did, however, get a bold new force in the form of ‘gunboats’ that are sure to make Somali pirates green with envy.

“These patrol vessels and the newly formed Tactical Marine Unit represent a significant enhancement of the department’s ability to detect, disrupt and deter illegal activity along the Rio Grande River and Texas coast,” said DPS Director Steven McCraw. “We are honored to name these boats after our State Troopers who have paid the ultimate sacrifice serving and protecting the people of Texas.”

The press release continues to say:

The black and white patrol vessels are equipped with advanced law enforcement technology, including multiple automatic weapons, ballistic shielding and night vision capabilities. All six patrol vessels are funded by the Texas Legislature and federal homeland security grants.

According to Fox News, the price tag on each of the boats comes in at $558,000. Four of the boats are now patrolling the waters with two more to be commissioned soon.

Given that U.S. ranchers along the border live in fear, thousands of lives have been lost due to drug-related violence and the fact that just a few weeks ago, an ICE agent was shot in Texas while on surveillance – I’d say it’s a pretty good investment.

Fox reports:

Since 2007, roughly 56,000 people in Mexico have been killed in the escalating drug cartel violence. The U.S. government and local police agencies are working around the clock, 365 days a year to try and stop the flow of drugs, weapons and illegal immigrants into America from our southern neighbor.

Of the nearly 2,000-mile border with Mexico, about 1,200 of it is in Texas. The terrain here is very different compared to California, New Mexico and Arizona — states with dry land on the border.

The narrow and winding Rio Grande, meanwhile, is a hotbed of activity, since you can literally swim from one side to the other in just a few minutes. Officials say this makes it extremely enticing for smugglers, which is why authorities have to be one step ahead.

Check out the boats in action: