Video Podcast – Joe Biden Can’t Debate – Goya CEO Not Caving to Cancel Mob

by: Brent Smith

Joe Biden cannot debate Trump. By not debate, I mean he can’t do a live, on-stage debate. His only shot is to demand a Zoom video type debate, where he can be coached by minions off camera.

Goya Foods CEO, Bob Unanue, has thus far, not caved to the cancel culture mob.

His company is now being boycotted because he dared to stand up in front of God and the world, during a White House lawn speech, and praise president Trump. That just isn’t done, and must be punished, say the leftist thugs, who’s only concern is getting rid of Orange Man. Nothing else matters – certainly not the 4,000 Goya employees. read more

Twenty Percent of Alzheimer’s Patients may be Misdiagnosed

Quadruple misfolded proteins, or QMP, refers to the presence of four separate kinds of toxic protein accumulations
Quadruple misfolded proteins, or QMP, refers to the presence of four separate kinds of toxic protein accumulations

Scientists are already struggling to make headway in the fight against dementia, and the discovery of a new more aggressive form of neurodegeneration that’s often misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease further complicates the problem.

A new study from the University of Kentucky has described a novel form of dementia characterized by the toxic accumulation of four different proteins in the brain. The research suggests many patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease may be suffering from this different, and more complex, neurodegenerative condition. read more

Vaccine for Dementia and Alzheimer’s?

A potential dementia vaccine should move into human trials within the next 18 to 24 months
A potential dementia vaccine should move into human trials within the next 18 to 24 months

A newly published study has described the successful results in mice of a novel vaccine designed to prevent neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers suggest this “dementia vaccine” is now ready for human trials, and if successful could become the “breakthrough of the next decade.” read more

Is Healing the Blood-Brain Barrier the Key to Halting Dementia?

The results of new research that has reversed dementia in mice is impressive but some are questioning whether they will apply to humans
The results of new research that has reversed dementia in mice is impressive but some are questioning whether they will apply to humans

Two compelling new studies are building on a hypothesis suggesting age-related dementia is caused by a leaky blood-brain barrier, triggering neuro-inflammation and, ultimately, brain cell damage. The research reveals a novel anti-inflammatory drug can reverse brain aging in senile mice, but experts suggest the studies are interesting but not particularly applicable to human cases of dementia. read more

High Blood Pressure Linked to Cognitive Decline

Subjects undergoing treatment for high blood pressure demonstrated slower rates of cognitive decline compared to those with untreated high blood pressure
Subjects undergoing treatment for high blood pressure demonstrated slower rates of cognitive decline compared to those with untreated high blood pressure
American Heart Association

New research from Columbia University, presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions, is adding weight to a growing body of evidence connecting high blood pressure to the onset of cognitive decline and dementia. The study suggests treating high blood pressure can potentially slow the rate of cognitive decline. read more

Our Brains Also Sag with Age

The numerous folds which cover our brains change over time, becoming slacker as we age, according to a study.

What’s more, this slacking was seen to be more pronounced in those with Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers believe that learning more about how the mechanisms which control how folding changes with age could potentially be used to help diagnose brain diseases and spot dementia.

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Researchers mapped the brains of 1,000 people found the folds covering their brains (pictured) changed with age, with the cortex losing elasticity and becoming more slack
Researchers mapped the brains of 1,000 people found the folds covering their brains (pictured) changed with age, with the cortex losing elasticity and becoming more slack

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