Robots Take British Jobs

Robots may take four million British jobs in the private sector within the next decade, some business leaders believe.

Those surveyed for by YouGov for the Royal Society of Arts said 15 per cent of all jobs were under threat.

The most vulnerable fields are finance and accounting, transportation and distribution, manufacturing and marketing and public relations, the survey found.

Robots could take four million British jobs in the private sector within the next decade, some business leaders believe 

read more

Apple Watch Series 3

Apple’s Watch has been something of a slow burn among consumers – but, with the latest model that packs in cellular capabilities for the first time, expect that to change very quickly.

Where it’s primarily been a hit for its fitness and health tracking, the latest update is going to open up a whole new world – and see consumers leaving their phone at home.

Apple has managed to cram in cellular capabilities that let you make calls, use apps and get notifications anywhere you have coverage.

After just a week with it, I’ve already found myself not bothering to take my phone on runs, quick trips to the shop and even the odd night out.

Scroll down for video

Apple has revealed its newest smartwatch will be equipped with its own built-in cellular capabilities for the first time. The $399 Series 3 Apple Watch will allow users to make calls directly from their wrist, without an iPhone nearby

read more

2500 Year Old Shipwrecks Found Intact

Dozens of perfectly preserved ancient shipwrecks have been found at the bottom of the Black Sea.

A total of 60 wrecks were discovered dating back as far as 2,500 years, including galleys from the Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman empires.

Scientists stumbled upon the graveyard while using underwater robots to survey the effects of climate change along the Bulgarian coast.

Because the Black Sea contains almost no light or oxygen, little life can survive, meaning the wrecks are in excellent condition.

Researchers say their discovery is ‘truly unrivalled’. Many of the ships have features that are only known from drawings or written description but never seen until now.

Carvings in the wood of some ships have remained intact for centuries, while well-preserved rope was found aboard one 2,000-year-old Roman vessel.

Scroll down for video

Dozens of perfectly preserved ancient shipwrecks have been found at the bottom of the Black Sea. This image shows a 3D model of a Roman ship lying in over 2000m (650 ft) of water. Its mast still stands, both quarter rudders with their tillers are still attached. Rope is still draped over the frames due to the preservation of materials in the Black Sea¿s anoxic conditionsDozens of perfectly preserved ancient shipwrecks have been found at the bottom of the Black Sea. This image shows a 3D model of a Roman ship lying in over 2000m (650 ft) of water. Its mast still stands, both quarter rudders with their tillers are still attached. Rope is still draped over the frames due to the preservation of materials in the Black Sea’s anoxic conditions

read more

Are We Being Watched?

If there were aliens sitting on at least nine exoplanets in other solar systems, they would be ideally placed to spy on what we’re doing on Earth, a new study has found.

Researchers identified parts of the distant sky from where various planets in our solar system could be seen to pass in front of the sun – so-called ‘transit zones’.

In addition to this, the team estimate there should be approximately ten (currently undiscovered) worlds which are favourably located to detect the Earth and could sustain life as we know it.

Scroll down for video

Image shows where transits of our solar system planets can be observed. Each line represents where one of the planets could be seen to transit, with the blue line representing the transit of Earth. If an observer were located along this line they could detect us

Image shows where transits of our solar system planets can be observed. Each line represents where one of the planets could be seen to transit, with the blue line representing the transit of Earth. If an observer were located along this line they could detect us.

read more

Yellowstone Super-Caldera Has Deformed

As small earthquakes continue to rumble around the Yellowstone supervolcano in Wyoming, scientists have revealed new evidence of the changes going on beneath the ground.

A new map from the US Geological Survey shows how the ground around the Yellowstone caldera has deformed over the span of two years, as the quakes release uplift-causing pressure, allowing the ground to sink back down.

This activity is typically linked to changes in magma and gases deep below the surface – but for now, the experts say there’s no cause for worry.

Scroll down for video

In the map above, a bulls-eye shaped section of uplift can be seen at the Norris Geyser Basin, where the ground has risen roughly 3 inches. And, an elliptical subsidence can be seen in the Yellowstone caldera, with the ground dropping about 1.2 inches

EARTHQUAKE SWARM 

The University of Utah’s Seismograph Stations (UUSS) have been monitoring the activity since it began June 12.

A total of 1,562 quakes have been recorded so far at Yellowstone since the swarm began.

Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise about 50 per cent of the total activity in the Yellowstone region.

Although the latest swarm is the largest since 2012, it is fewer than weekly counts during similar events in 2002, 2004, 2008 and 2010. 

Tremors were recorded from ground level to 9mi (14.5km) below sea level.

Seismic activity could be a sign of an impending eruption of the supervolcano, although this is impossible to predict exactly

The map, created by USGS geophysicist Chuck Wicks uses data from June 2015 and July 2017 to show how the region around Yellowstone has changed.

In the map, the colourful rings show the changes in the ground’s elevation as seen by a radar satellite, according to USGS.

A bulls-eye shaped section of uplift can be seen at the Norris Geyser Basin, where the ground has risen roughly 3 inches.

And, an elliptical subsidence can be seen in the Yellowstone caldera, with the ground dropping about 1.2 inches.

Continue reading

An Autonomous Helicopter Air Taxi

German automobile firm Daimler and other investors have has invested more than $29 million dollars (25 million euro) in aviation start-up Volocopter.

Volocopter plans to use the money to invest in further developing its electrically powered, autonomous Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) aircraft and ‘conquer’ the market for flying air taxis.

Volocopter’s ‘Volocopter 2X’ is a fully electric VTOL with 18 quiet rotors and a maximum airspeed of 100 kilometers (62 miles) per hour – and it can transport two passengers without a pilot.

Scroll down for videos

Volocopter announced that in the fourth quarter of 2017, it will work with Dubai's Road and Transport Authority (RTA) to conduct tests of its vehicle as an autonomous air taxi. The trial operations and certification program is expected to continue for five years

read more

Spider-Scorpion Hybrid Found in Arizona

A spider-scorpion hybrid may sound like a creature from the latest horror blockbuster.

But such a creature exists in the real world, and one was spotted this week by a man in Arizona.

The animal is a camel spider, otherwise known as a wind scorpion – a cousin of both spiders and scorpions that has traits seen in both.

Scroll down for video

The idea of a spider-scorpion hybrid may sound like a creature from the latest horror blockbuster. But such a creature exists in the real world, and one was spotted this week by a man in Arizona

read more

Nielsen to Add Hulu and YouTube

Nielsen will begin including Hulu Live TV and Google’s YouTube TV viewing in its TV ratings in the United States in an effort to capture the shift from traditional broadcast to watching shows on laptops or smartphones, the company said on Tuesday.

All programming on Hulu Live TV and YouTube TV that has the same commercials that ran when the program aired on TV, will be included in Nielsen’s ratings no matter the device or whether it was viewed live or on DVR, the advertising tracking company said.

As viewers increasingly ‘cut the cord’, or cancel their cable package subscriptions and move to skinny bundles such as Sling TV and streaming sites like Hulu, it is important for Nielsen to account for these digital players, Nielsen’s Executive Vice President of product leadership Megan Clarken told Reuters.

Scroll down for video  read more

UberEats to Provide McDelivery

McDonald’s has launched its long-awaited home delivery trial in the UK after teaming up with Uber’s takeaway service.

The fast food giant is offering its ‘McDelivery’ service through UberEats, with orders available from 22 locations across London and another 10 restaurants in Leeds and Nottingham.

It comes after similar tie-ups with Uber in the US, while McDonald’s already delivers in China and Singapore.

McDonald's has launched its long-awaited home delivery trial in the UK after teaming up with Uber's takeaway service (file picture)

read more

Mars Colonists May Evolve

Nasa plans to put humans on Mars by 2030 and has already begun to test the limits of its astronauts.

But we may have to take more drastic steps – including modifications to the body and mind – if we are ever to succeed in visiting our inhospitable neighbour.

And once we arrive on the red planet, its unique environment could force rapid evolutionary changes creating a whole new species, experts claim.

Scroll down for video

Cognitive scientist Konrad Szocik believes astronauts undertaking missions to Mars may need electronic enhancements to the senses or drugs to dull panic and other emotional reactions to endure the trip (stock image)
Cognitive scientist Konrad Szocik believes astronauts undertaking missions to Mars may need electronic enhancements to the senses or drugs to dull panic and other emotional reactions to endure the trip (stock image)

THE PREDICTIONS 

Electronic devices to enhance the senses and drugs to dull panic and other emotional responses may be needed to successfully complete the trip to Mars.

Any humans who choose to stay and colonise the planet will be faced with other challenges, including the risk of inbreeding.

Colonists may quickly – in scientific terms – evolve into a separate species, with darker skin and thickened bones.

Social problems faced here on Earth, like conflicts, crime and wars, will also need to be addressed.

Cognitive scientist Konrad Szocik at the University of Information Technology and Management in Rzeszow, Poland, believes that preparations being carried out by Nasa come nowhere near to a realistic simulation of the conditions that they will face.

He suggests that electronic devices to enhance the senses and drugs to dull panic and other emotional responses may be needed to successfully complete the trip.

And any humans who choose to stay may evolve into a separate species, according to evolutionary biologist Scott Soloman.