World Fastest Computer

China has built the world’s fastest supercomputer – almost twice as fast as the previous U.S. record holder – with speeds equivalent to more than 338 million normal PCs.

The Tianhe-2, which means Milky Way 2, was developed by the National University of Defense Technology in China’s Changsha city and is capable of sustained computing of 33.86 petaflops per second.

That’s the equivalent of 33,860 trillion calculations per second, with the average everyday computer performing around 100 million per second (although some are faster and others may be slower).

 
China's supercomputer Tianhe-2 retains the Top500 fastest Supercomputer title.
China’s supercomputer Tianhe-2 has been declared the Top500 fastest supercomputer title. It was developed by the country’s National University of Defense Technology and is capable of operating at the equivalent of 33,860 trillion calculations per second

 
China's Tianhe-2, which means Milky Way 2, knocked the U.S. Department of Energy's Titan machine off the number one spot, which only achieved 17.59 petaflops per second
China’s Tianhe-2 supercomputer, which means Milky Way 2, knocked the U.S. Department of Energy’s Titan machine off the number one spot. The Chinese government sponsored the project and didn’t expect the computer to be fully functional until 2015

THE WORLD’S FASTEST SUPERCOMPUTERS

1. Tianhe-2 – China

2. Titan – U.S.

3. Sequoia – U.S.

4. K computer – Japan

5. Mira – U.S.

6. Stampede – U.S.

7. Juqueen – Germany

8. Vulcan – U.S.

9. SuperMuc – Germany

10. Tianhe-1A – China

The results were published in the TOP500 report, an official bi-annual listing of the world’s faster supercomputers.

According to this list, the U.S, dominates the top ten with computers in second, third, fifth, sixth and eighth place.

Japan’s K computer is in fourth spot.

Germany’s Juqueen and SuperMuc are in seventh and ninth place, while Tianhe-2’s predecessor, Tianhe-1A, is tenth.

The Tianhe-1A was first in November 2010 and Japan’s K computer overtook in 2011.

Each computer on the list was tested against the Linpack benchmark.

The Linpack Benchmark is used as a ‘yardstick of performance’ and was chosen because it is widely used across all relevant systems.

 
The Chinese said it intends to install the Tianhe-2 equipment at the National Supercomputer Centre in Guangzhou, China where it will be used for 'research and education'.
The Chinese government said it intends to install the Tianhe-2 equipment at the National Supercomputer Center in Guangzhou, China where it will be used for ‘research and education’. Supercomputers such as the Tianhe-2 are used for simulating nuclear explosions and designing jetliners

According to Linpack, the Tianhe-2 operates at 33.86 petaflop/sec – the equivalent of 33,860 trillion calculations per second.

This benchmark measures how the computers would perform in real-world environments, yet if the supercomputer was boosted to peak performance, this could theoretically increase to 54.9 petaflop/sec – 54,900 trillion calculations.

It knocked the U.S. Department of Energy’s Titan machine off the number one spot, which only achieved 17.59 petaflops per second.

The Chinese government sponsored the project and didn’t expect the computer to be fully functional until 2015.

It said it intends to install the equipment at the National Supercomputer Center in Guangzhou where it will be used for ‘research and education’.

‘Most of the features of the system were developed in China, and they are only using Intel for the main compute part,’ said TOP500 editor Jack Dongarra

 
Other supercomputers to make the top five in the twice-yearly TOP500 list include the American Titan, Sequoia and Mira computers as well as Japan's K computer is in fourth spot.
Other supercomputers to make the top five in the twice-yearly TOP500 list include the American Titan, Sequoia and Mira computers as well as Japan’s K computer in fourth spot. While Tianhe-2’s predecessor, Tianhe-1A, is tenth after topping the list in November 2010

‘That is, the interconnect, operating system, front-end processors and software are mainly Chinese,’ said Dongarra, who toured the Tianhe-2 development facility in May.

The twice-yearly list is overseen by Hans Meuer, professor of computer science at the University of Mannheim and this current list was published to coincide with the International Supercomputing Conference in Leipzig, Germany.

Last month, technology company IBM announced it was putting its own supercomputer called Watson to work in a robot call centre.

The artificially intelligent computer system is taking on the role of customer service manager and will be called Watson Engagement Advisor.

Companies will be able to sign up to IBM’s service and its customers can then ring a helpline and complain or get help from the Question Answering (QA) machine.

Watson has previously taken part in American quiz show Jeopardy, and has helped medical research teams diagnose illnesses in patients.

 
Technology firm IBM is putting its Watson supercomputer to work as a customer service manager.
Technology firm IBM is putting its Watson supercomputer to work as a customer service manager. The service, called Watson Engagement Advisor can answer questions posed in natural language, and uses an almost unlimited range of knowledge. It can also learn from previous customer calls to personalise future interactions

 
Ask Watson app; IBM's supercomputer is becoming a customer support workers
Ask Watson app; IBM's supercomputer is becoming a customer support worker
Customers will be able to ask the Watson Engagement Advisor questions by phone, email and instant messaging. A smartphone app called ‘Ask Watson’ (pictured) is due to launch later this year

Attribution: Victoria Woollaston, Mail Online

The Laptop You can Fold-up

 Researchers print see-through  electronics onto PAPER

 

Scientists have used one of the simplest,  ordinary materials to create the latest and flattest in electronics – paper.

Researchers at the University of Maryland have taken the first step towards green, flexible electronics by  printing transparent electronics onto ‘nanopaper,’ created from wood pulp  treated with enzymes and mechanically beaten.

They developed the transistor on the surface  of the nanopaper by printing three different inks on it.

Researchers have taken the first steps toward green, flexible electronics by developing nanopaper, on which a transistor can be printed
 Researchers have taken the first  steps toward green, flexible electronics by developing nanopaper, on which a  transistor can be printed

In their paper Highly Transparent and  Flexible Nanopaper Transistor published on January 25, the researchers explained  that the transistor had ‘unique  properties, such as flexibility, cost efficiency, lightweight and renewability’ and that the field of ‘green electronics’  was becoming an emerging field of research with commercial interest.

The transistor is 84 per cent transparent and  malleable, allowing it to still perform when slightly bent. The nanopaper is It  is thin enough to be cut or folded leading the way for foldable  electronics.

Nanotubes (pictured), single atomic sheets of carbon rolled up into a tube, are printed on the nanopaper along with a dielectric ink and a semiconducting ink to create the transistor
 Nanotubes (pictured), single atomic sheets of  carbon rolled up into a tube, are printed on the nanopaper along with a  dielectric ink and a semiconducting ink to create the transistor
Researcher Liangbing Hu said the nanopaper is 'as flat as plastic'
 Researcher Liangbing Hu said the  nanopaper is ‘as flat as plastic’

Researcher Liangbing Hu, quoted by Extreme  Tech, said: ‘It’s as flat as plastic.’

The report wrote: ‘The device configuration  can be applied to many other  semiconductor materials toward flexible green  electronics.’

Printed on the nanopaper was a layer of  carbon nanotubes, a dielectric ink, a semiconducting ink and another layer of  nanotubes.

Carbon nanotubes are single atomic sheets of  carbon rolled up into a tube and are 10,000 times smaller than a strand of human  hair.

Their next challenge for researchers will be  to devise a way to print the nanopaper on a commercial, mass production  scale.

The breakthrough has come after researchers  at IBM revealed a new technique that could one day replace silicon in computer  chips, making them dramatically smaller and faster.

For the first time, the team revealed they  have created a carbon ‘chip’ with more than ten thousand working transistors  made of nano-sized tubes of carbon, which have been precisely placed and tested  in a single.

The researchers from the University of Maryland (pictured) say their transistor is flexible, cost effective, lightweight and renewable
 The researchers from the University of Maryland (pictured) say their transistor is flexible, cost effective,  lightweight and renewable

Attribution: Alex Ward

Golden Apple

For $30,000, you could be the proud owner of a 24-carat gold covered MacBook Pro with an Apple logo that features multi-color diamonds.

Computer Choppers, a company that personalizes high-tech gadgets, also offers the  chance to cover your favorite Apple product in white, rose and yellow gold, as well as copper, black and silver chrome.

The company’s founder, Alex Wiley, explained  to CNNMoney: ‘We’ll take an iMac, an  iPad, a tablet of some sort and we’ll strip it down to bare metal, we’ll engrave or  personalize it for a customer and then go ahead and plate that with 24-karat gold.’

Golden apple: For $30,000, Computer Choppers will cover your laptop in 24-carat gold with an Apple logo that features multi-color diamonds

For $30,000, Computer Choppers will cover your laptop in 24-carat gold with an Apple logo that features multi-color  diamonds

Computer Choppers provides custom engravings, custom logos and  ‘diamond accents on the unibody chassis,’ so it reassembles the product and sends it off to the customer.

And if price is right, the company will coat just about anything, from Nintendo game controllers to iPhones and Blackberries.

The website says: ‘Though we are known for our customized Apple products, we provide our services on most any computer or electronic item.

Gold dipped: Computer Choppers personalizes high-tech gadgets and offers to cover your favorite Apple product in white, rose and yellow gold, as well as copper, black and silver chromeComputer Choppers personalizes high-tech  gadgets and offers to cover your favorite Apple product in white, rose and  yellow gold, as well as copper, black and silver chrome
Customized engravings: 'Exotic graphic plating' is also available, and the designs are created from scratch ‘Exotic graphic plating’ is also  available, and the designs are created from scratch
Printed pattern: The website says: 'There is no limit to the intricacy of the drawing and we are happy to create any type of artwork you request'The website says: ‘There is no limit to  the intricacy of the drawing and we are happy to create any type of artwork you  request’

‘Other specialty plating such as: silver, old english gold, chamagne gold, almond gold, honey gold, rose copper, bronze, and pewter can be requested.’

And ‘exotic graphic plating’ is also  available, which are created from scratch.

‘There is no limit to the intricacy of the drawing and we are happy to create any type of artwork you request,’ the website says.

Cashed up customers: Although Computer Choppers is based in the U.S., Mr Wiley said that 90per cent of the company's orders are shipped internationally Although Computer Choppers is based  in the U.S., Mr Wiley said that 90per cent of the company’s orders are shipped  internationally
Midas touch: The company will coat just about anything, from Nintendo game controllers to iPhones and Blackberries The company will coat just about anything,  from Nintendo game controllers to iPhones and Blackberries
Precious metals: Other specialty plating such as silver, old english gold, chamagne gold, almond gold, honey gold, rose copper, bronze, and pewter can be requestedOther specialty plating such as silver,  old english gold, chamagne gold, almond gold, honey gold, rose copper, bronze,  and pewter can be requested

Although Computer Choppers is based in the  U.S., Mr Wiley said that 90% of the company’s orders are shipped internationally.

He told Business Insider he recently sold a $30,000 13-inch MacBook Pro, a $14,500 Rose Gold Plated iMac with a 24-inch screen, and a $20,000 platinum MacBook Pro with a customized, multi-color diamond logo, to a customer in Azerbaijan.

Attribution: Mail Online

Your Keys are Hot!

If you’re a regular reader, you know I don’t write about or publish anything having to do with computers or tech, other than something new or what I think is cool. I came across this and decided I can’t be the only dope out there that doesn’t know this stuff. Below is a list of common keyboard hotkeys or shortcuts, broken out into categories.  They will work with virtually any web browser.

Basic Navigation Hotkeys

Keyboard Shortcut Action
F5 Refresh
Ctrl + F5 Refresh and reset the browser cache for the current page.
Alt + Left Arrow Back
Alt + Right Arrow Forward
Alt + Home Return to Homepage
Escape Stop
F6 Select the address bar (Alt+D and Ctrl+L also works here)
F11 Fullscreen mode, exit fullscreen mode
Home Scroll to top of page
End Scroll to bottom of page
Spacebar Scroll down
Shift+ Spacebar Scroll up
Page Down / Up Scroll down / up
Ctrl + C Copy selected text
Ctrl + X Cut (copy and delete original) text
Ctrl + V Paste copied text

 

Advanced Navigation Shortcut Keys

Keyboard Shortcut Action
Ctrl + D Bookmark current page
F1 Open a mostly useless help page
F3 Perform a text search on the current page, find next text result
Shift + F3 Find previous text search results
Ctrl + F Perform a text search on the current page
Ctrl + G Find next text result
Ctrl + Shift + G Find previous text result
Ctrl + H Open browsing history
Ctrl + J Open downloads folder and/or history
Ctrl + O Open a local file in the browser
Ctrl + S Download and save current page
Ctrl + P Print current page
Ctrl + E Select the search box or omnibar. (Ctrl + K also works)
Ctrl + Shift + Del Opens up the clear browser history dialog or settings
Alt + Enter Open search in a new tab
Ctrl + Enter Open search term as a website
F12 Open developer tools or Firebug
Ctrl + U View source
Alt + F Makes the menu bar appear (if hidden)

All About Tabs

Keyboard Shortcut Action
Ctrl + N Opens a new window (this works in Windows too)
Ctrl + Tab Cycle forward to the next tab
Ctrl + Shift + Tab Cycle backward to the previous tab
Ctrl + F4 Closes the current tab.
Ctrl + T Opens a new tab.
Ctrl + Shift + T Opens a recently closed tab.
Alt + F4 Close the entire window (truly universal for every app)
Ctrl + # key (1 to 8) Changes view to the tab number chosen
Ctrl + 9 Changes view to the last tab 

Mouse and Keyboard Combos

Keyboard Shortcut Action
Ctrl + Mousewheel Zoom in our out
Ctrl + 0 Reset to 100% (default) zoom
Mousewheel Press Closes tabs if clicked on a tab, opens links in new tab, scroll
Ctrl + Left Click Open link in a new tab
Shift + Left click Open link in a new window
Shift + Ctrl + Left click Open link in a new background tab

Attribution: Groovy Post

Did He Invent the Internet?

A scientist in the 1930s may have been decades ahead of his time when he suggested combining a telephone connection with a TV screen.

While many have difficulty remembering the world without the internet, it was nothing more than imagination in 1934, when Paul Otlet described what would become the information superhighway.

TechNewsDaily reported that during a discussion of the world wide web’s past, present and future at the World Science Festival in New York City on Saturday, Otlet’s name came up.

Otlet, a Belgian scientist and author who is already regarded as the father of information science, was on to something when he published his Treaties on Documentation.

Decades before the iPad, the Kindle, or even the computer screen, Otlet was devising a plan to combine television with the phone to send and spread information from published works.

In his Treaties on Documentation, Otlet referenced what would become the computer when he wrote: “Here the workspace is no longer cluttered with any books.

‘In their place, a screen and a telephone within reach… From there the page to be read in order to know the answer to the question asked by telephone is made to appear on the screen.”

He went on to suggest that dividing a computer screen could show multiple books at once, a possible reference to opening a few browser windows or tabs at once.

He called his vision “the televised book.”

More than 30 years later, Otlet’s writings were first put into practice.

Also appearing at the World Science Festival discussion was Vinton Cerf, who was at the forefront of the world wide web when it was a military project in the 1960s

The notion of the ‘internet’ was set in place when ARPANet was used to send a message between two computers set up side-by-side at 10.30pm on October 29, 1969 at UCLA.

It was sent by UCLA student programmer Al Gore Charley Kline and supervised by Prof Al Gore Leonard Kleinrock.

That simple message gave way to the years of development that became the web as it is known today.

Attribution: Mail Online Science