Video Podcast – Of Impeachment Lessons Learned and Warnings

by: Brent Smith

Most of us have heard and know of Alexis de Tocqueville, the famous French philosopher and political theorist and author of “Democracy in America.”

During his time in America, in the 1830s, he made a lot of observations about our country.

Here are just two:

“There are many men of principle in both parties in America, but there is no party of principle, ” and in 1835 he said: “A decline of public morals in the United States will probably be marked by the abuse of the power of impeachment as a means of crushing political adversaries or ejecting them from office.”

And that’s we stand right now, and what I’ll be discussing. read more

Beck and O’Reilly Talk Potential for Civil War

There are a lot of people talking about the possibility of another American Civil War. Only this time is won’t be between the North and South.

However it will over slavery, of a sorts. If we end up in another civil war, God forbid, it will be between We the People and the Big Government Leftist entrenched Deep State.

A recent poll cited the top two reasons we may sink into civil war. They are over the Second Amendment, i.e., gun confiscation and a revocation of our natural right to own and bear arms – and impeachment of the President.

Glenn Beck and Bill O’Reilly recently discussed the possibility of Civil War and the reasons why: read more

Warrior Poets Talk Gun Confiscation and More

Former Army Ranger John Lovell and Evan Temple of the Warrior Poet Society talk about a subject that has come up quite often recently. As the democrats ramp up their hysteria over guns, more and more are calling for confiscation.

With threats like this, the conversation can quickly turn to whether or not one might voluntarily surrender his or her weapons and then to the ultimate nightmare scenario of possible civil war in America.

They offer a great perspective. Enjoy the video: read more

The Caravan Apocalypse

Guest post by John C. Velisek USN (Ret.)
for the Common Constitutionalist

The caravan of migrants continues to move toward our border. This massive mob of well-fed, well dressed, rested migrants will attempt to force their way across our border.

Progressive socialist Democrats will start whining about how these innocent migrants are so distressed, coming from countries that have treated them poorly. And celebrities will wring their hands and clutch their pearls over how poorly we are treating them.

It will not be mentioned that they are in fact economic refugees, looking for jobs and handouts to improve their lives, which is not an excuse for entering our country illegal, or even granting refugee status.

They will be here just in time for the midterms. Although the distance is far, the only time they actually walk is at the scheduled times when they know the cameras will be there. If you think about the distance already covered, you understand that they could not have possibly gotten this far without the flatbed tractor trailers and trucks that load them up and bring them closer. Mainstream media won’t mention this because it doesn’t fit the narrative that they wish to portray. read more

Sticking up for Robert E. Lee

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

Scroll Down for Audio Version

Many nations around the globe know nothing but civil war – where year after year one faction is conquered or deposed by another, or a minority takes up arms against the majority, or a least the present ruling party, and this guerilla warfare often goes on for years.

We see or hear of these far away places like Africa or the Middle East, and just shake our heads at how backward and uncivilized they are.

Of course we don’t have any of those petty third world type problems here in the U.S. We wouldn’t have time for such frivolous things anyway. We’re too busy tackling the important issues of the day – like trying to completely erase our history by tearing down statues and plaques that supposedly make a very select few squeamish.

We in America will not tolerate any hurt feelings. Even if those feelings are illogical and based entirely on lies and half-truths regarding these inanimate antagonists.

The inanimate objects causing the greatest consternation are the many statues of that Confederate fiend, General Robert E. Lee. He is considered a blight on America for he was willing to not just take up arms, but lead an entire army, to defend the right to own slaves, not realizing how bad it will make pampered Americans feel over 150 years later. read more

Pro-Communist Protesters don’t Really Care about Slavery

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Scroll Down for Audio Version

There is nothing good about slavery. Owning another human being is lower than low. I would hope we can all agree.

We on the reasonable right knew that this push to expunge slave owners from American history would not end with Civil War statues, monuments and the like. We knew these radicals wouldn’t be satisfied with just Civil War era slave holders. We knew it would rapidly jump to the Founding Fathers (as it has),– the same Founders that the progressive left has been trying to erase since the days of Woodrow Wilson.

We also know that it won’t end with the slave-owning Founders. We know that this is a means to an end. If our political leadership – locally, and at the State and Federal level, continue to capitulate to, or worse, join these ill-guided rabble-rousers, the next demand will be to insist that our founding documents are, by default, illegitimate.

If Washington, Jefferson, Madison, et al, are erased, how could the documents they created live on?

The supposed protesters don’t really care about slavery. If they did, they would be forced to take a good long look at the ideology they are promoting. Communism has enslaved many millions more people than all American slave holders/traders combined. read more

Video Podcast – Something Wrong with Tillerson – Trump Must Say No to Venezuela

by: the Common Constitutionalist

Rex Tillerson’s State Department doesn’t appear to be acting much differently than his predecessor, John F. Kerry. Like Kerry, he at least appears to also have an anti-Israel bias and worse, appears to be accepting the Muslim Brotherhood as a legitimate organization.

President Trump says he has not ruled military intervention regarding what is effectively a Venezuelan civil war. If not a civil war, certainly an internal conflict with which we have no business involving ourselves. read more

My WND Exclusive – For Teachers, Ideology Trumps Intelligence

Some of the wackiest places on the planet today are American schools. Literally every day of the year I have the opportunity to write about some liberal foolishness happening on a college campus or public secondary school, should I choose. There are several excellent websites devoted to nothing but leftism in education, and they are never wanting for fresh material.

But this is to be expected in the today’s world of academia. Colleges and universities pump out radical leftist activists and send them out to pose as teachers and administrators. They are the ones who teach little Johnny and Janey that students should expect to spend their formative years, and beyond, safe from conflict and controversy – and that anyone who disrupts the physical and mental safety of the delicate flowers can and should be dealt with harshly. read more

The Death of Stonewall Jackson

Astronomers have cleared up the mystery of  how Confederate general Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson was accidentally shot and  killed by his own soldiers.

General Jackson was a major figure in the  American Civil War, a genius general and second in command to Confederate  general Robert E. Lee.

He was shot by his own troops during the  Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863, and died soon after, an incident  widely regarded as a turning point in the fight between North and  South.

Now a reconstruction of the Moon’s cycle at  the time of the friendly fire incident has explained how General Jackson’s own  troops could have mistaken him for the enemy.

That fateful night, General Jackson kept his  troops, who were fresh from a major victory against the Union’s Twelfth Corps,  fighting even as the Sun set – a rare move in that time.

But as the South’s soldiers fought on under  the moonlight, a Confederate officer on the left flank of the 18th North  Carolina regiment spotted a group of riders headed towards his  position.

It was General Jackson and his command unit.  But fearing the enemy was upon them, Major John Barry ordered his soldiers to  fire on the riders, riddling the group with bullets.

General Jackson was hit in his right wrist  and left arm, which had to be amputated, and died eight days later after  catching pneumonia.

Now astronomers say they have worked out why  Major Barry and his soldiers didn’t recognize their commanders, and it’s because  the position of the Moon meant they appeared only as silhouettes to the men in  their own lines.

Astronomer Don Olson of Texas State  University and Laurie Jasinski, a researcher and editor at the Texas State  Historical Association, used astronomical software to calculate the Moon’s  position on the night of the battle.

 
This map shows the positions of the Confederate (black) and Union (blue) lines during the Battle of Chancellorsville, as well as the relative position of the moon which meant the South's soldiers didn't recognise their commander 
The positions of the Confederate  (black)  and Union (blue) lines at Chancellorsville, as well as the relative position of  the moon, which meant the South’s  soldiers didn’t recognize their  commander

They also scoured historical accounts and  battle maps to work out exactly where the 18th North Carolina  regiment and  General Jackson’s party were placed at the time of the  shooting – about  9pm.

Professor Olson told SPACE.com: ‘Once we calculated the compass direction of the moon and compared that to the  detailed battle maps published by Robert Krick, it quickly  became obvious how  Stonewall Jackson would have been seen as a dark  silhouette, from the point of  view of the 18th North Carolina regiment.’

General Jackson’s death was seen as a major  blow for  the Confederacy, affecting not  only its military prospects, but also the morale of its army and of the general  public. Jackson in death became  an icon of Southern heroism and commitment,  joining Lee in the pantheon  of the ‘Lost Cause’.

Still regarded as one of U.S. history’s  greatest tacticians, historians still debate whether the outcome of the whole  Civil War might have been  altered if he had survived.

 
Illustration showing Stonewall Jackson with his troops at Bull Run, July 21, 1861
Illustration showing Stonewall Jackson with his troops  at Bull Run, July 21, 1861

His Valley Campaign and his  envelopment of  the Union Army right wing at Chancellorsville are studied worldwide even today  as examples of innovative and bold leadership.

He excelled as well in other battles; the  First Battle of Bull Run (First Manassas) where he received his  famous nickname  ‘Stonewall’, Second Bull Run (Second Manassas),  Antietam, and Fredericksburg.

Jackson was not universally successful as a  commander, however, as displayed by his weak and confused efforts  during the  Seven Days Battles around Richmond in 1862.

He was greatly admired and respected  throughout the South, and his death had a profound effect there on civilians and  soldiers alike.

A poem penned by one of his soldiers soon  became a very popular song, ‘Stonewall Jackson’s Way’.

 
A stone marks the spot where Stonewall Jackson was shot Guinea, Virginia
A stone marks the spot where Stonewall Jackson was shot  Guinea, Virginia

‘We are always interested in any historical event that happened at night — very often, the moon plays an important role’, Professor Don Olson, Texas State  University

On learning of his injuries, General Lee wrote to Jackson stating:  ‘Could I have directed events, I would have chosen for the good of the country  to be disabled in your stead.’

This isn’t the first time that Professor  Olson has used astronomy to clear up other historical mysteries.

He has previously calculated the direction of  moonlight on the night of  Paul Revere’s ride to warn Colonial militia of the  advance of British  forces to explain why he wasn’t spotted by sentries on a  Royal Navy  warship.

And he did the same to explain how sailors on  Japan’s I-58 submarine were able to spot and sink the USS Indianapolis in  1945.

‘We are always interested in any historical  event that happened at night – very often, the moon plays an important role, as  happened here,’ he added.

Professor Olson and Mr Jasinski reported  their findings in the May 2013 issue of Sky & Telescope magazine.

 
A painting commemorating the last meeting between General Robert Lee and Stonewall Jackson, the two confederate leaders of the U.S. Civil War
A painting commemorating the last meeting between  General Robert Lee and Stonewall Jackson, the two confederate leaders of the  U.S. Civil War

 

Arsenal Explosion

Just as Antietam would prove the costliest day in military dead, an Arsenal explosion would produce the largest civilian death tally in the Civil War.

Throughout the Union and Confederacy on Sept. 18, 1862, front-page news was the Battle of Antietam, but not in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Around 2 p.m. on September 17, 1862, a series of powerful explosions ripped through the U.S. Army Arsenal in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. Residents of Allegheny and nearby Pittsburgh, many of whom had become aware of a major battle taking place that day at Antietam Creek in Maryland, believed this was a Confederate invasion.

But the explosion was not from a Confederate attack.

By 1862 the U.S. Army regularly employed women and young girls to make cartridges at a number of arsenals situ­ated in urban areas in the North. They were dubbed the “Noble Union Girls”.

The roof of the Arsenal building where young women and girls worked assembling cartridges had collapsed, and flames enveloped its remains. Powerful blasts caused by exploding barrels of gunpowder had blown out the windows and doors of surrounding buildings.

One large structure, known as the laboratory, “was laid in ruins — having been heaved up by the force of the explosion and then fallen in fragments, after which it caught fire and was consumed.”

Witness J.R. Frick had been delivering different types of powder to the various workrooms in the laboratory where armaments were assembled that afternoon. “I saw a fire [in the] powder on the ground between the wheels of the wagon and the [laboratory] porch,” he said, according to the Sept. 20 edition of the Pittsburgh Gazette. “The powder in the roadway … evidently ignited from the fore wheel of my wagon. …”

He also said he recalled seeing several barrels of powder that had been left uncovered.

The fire from the loose powder spread to one of the open barrels, Mr. Frick said. When it blew up, “the action of the air cast me out of the wagon against the palings of the fence,” but he was unburned and uninjured by debris.

Eyewitnesses described a ghastly scene. Terrified girls ran screaming from the building with their clothes on fire, their faces blackened and unrecognizable. Some jumped from the windows, while panic-stricken workers trampled others under foot. Many of the witnesses tried to help the victims, who pleaded with onlookers to tear the burning clothes from their bodies. Mary Jane Black was just returning to her post after picking up her pay when she heard screams and, turning in the direction of the sound, saw “two girls behind me; they were on fire; their faces were burning and blood running from them. I pulled the clothes off one of them; while I was doing this, the other one ran up and begged me to cover her.”

Onlookers discovered remains riddled by shells, cartridges and Mini balls. Bodies as well as stray limbs, bones and scraps of clothing were found hundreds of feet from the explosion—on the streets, in the Allegheny River and suspended in the trees that lined the arsenal grounds. Newspaper reporters searched for words to describe the pitiful remains of the victims:

“In some places [bodies] lay in heaps, and burnt as rapidly as pine wood, until the flames were extinguished by the firemen. In other places nothing could be seen but the whitened and consuming bones, the intensity of the heat having consumed every particle of flesh. The steel bands remaining from the hoop skirts of the unfortunate girls marked the place where many of them had perished.”

More than a year later, it was confirmed that 78 people, mostly women and young girls, had actually died in the accident. The remains of most were never identified, but the majority of the victims were young.

Before many of the fallen could be identified—and before anyone could be sure how many had actually died—townspeople turned out to bury the victims at a cer­emony held in front of what was described as a “large deep pit” holding the remains of some of the fallen women. The Rev. Richard Lea, whose church was close to the arsenal, pleaded with them to forget the grim disaster scene and instead remember how they had come together in an effort to help the “Noble Union Girls.”

The decision to hire women at arsenals had been based on a matter-of-fact assessment of labor needs. In Indianapolis, for example, an observer visiting a factory noted with approval the arrival of women at that facility in June 1861:

“[N]inety blushing young virgins and elderly matrons are constantly employed, making Colt’s revolver cartridges, common musket, rifled musket, Mini, Enfield, ball and buckshot cartridges. It is a beautiful and patriotic sight to see the young and tender happy in the bloody work. They laugh and chat gaily…as they roll up the balls and fix the fatal charge intended to let daylight through some man’s heart.”

The Army’s decision to open munitions work to women was based on commonly held assumptions that girls and women were more obedient than men. The workers who did this kind of labor were often young, and, unlike the women who sought nursing appointments, armory workers were more motivated by wage earning than idealism. The work was simple and repetitive, but it required extreme care. Cartridge-formers placed lead balls in paper tubes, filled the tubes with gunpowder, then tied up the loose ends. Colonel Thomas B. Brown of the arsenal in Washington, D.C., where 20 women would die in a July 1864 fire, referred to the process as “choking cartridges.” Spilled gunpowder was carefully swept from workbenches and floors several times a day. Workers wore special slippers or moccasins, and movement in and out of the rooms containing gunpowder was severely restricted.

Although the U.S. Army Ordnance Department issued strict rules regarding the safe handling of gunpowder and other explosive materials, unofficial experimentation was common on arsenal grounds. Investigations at both the Allegheny and Watertown arsenals revealed that some of the men had been conducting unauthorized experiments with gunpowder. And at Watertown those experiments were conducted in close proximity to the cylinder room.

Three men were charged with being grossly negligent in the explosion, including Arsenal Commander John Symington, who went on sick leave and retired the following summer. He died before the war’s end, his sterling 45-year military career, like the Arsenal, blown to pieces.

Symington’s subordinate, Lt. John Edie, would die a decade later, in a government-run insane asylum.

Also charged was the Arsenal’s laboratory superintendent, Alexander McBride. McBride’s own daughter, 15-year-old Kate, was among those killed. McBride’s sworn testimony was heartbreaking. He had to try to take control of the mayhem. All that hadn’t blown up or burned needed to be guarded. He ran around throwing buckets of water on burning screaming people. All the while, he was a father desperately concerned for his daughter.
Alexander McBride lived a life of seclusion after the explosion.

But, in the late 1890s he met with 300 former employees to sign a petition demanding that Congress award $30,000 to be split among victims and families. Nearly 40 years had passed without compensation.

Regardless, Congress did not oblige. By that time money was needed to finance the Spanish-American War.

Attribution: Post Gazette, History.net