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Lung Cancer Advancements

A chance meeting may lead to a combination therapy that actually reduces side effect damage while...
A chance meeting may lead to a combination therapy that actually reduces side effect damage while improving effectiveness of chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer(Credit: muratart/Depositphotos)

Cancer treatment is often a case of robbing Peter to pay Paul. You may well have some success with chemotherapy, but subsequent damage to otherwise healthy organs and tissue is a trade-off that clinicians and patients have had to juggle with for decades. But, thanks to a chance meeting at the Hudson Institute in Melbourne, lung cancer patients could be looking at more effective chemo with fewer side effects. read more

New Drug Delivery for Brain Cancer

An artist's rendition of MIT's new nanoparticles, which can carry two forms of drug to combat...
An artist’s rendition of MIT’s new nanoparticles, which can carry two forms of drug to combat brain cancer(Credit: Stephen Morton)

Glioblastoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Affecting the brain, those unlucky enough to receive a diagnosis don’t have many treatment options – and usually a median life expectancy of just over a year. Now, researchers at MIT have developed nanoparticles that could provide hope, crossing the blood-brain barrier and delivering two types of drugs to fight tumors. read more

Cancer Killing Sperm

Sperm that’s been loaded with chemotherapy drugs could be used to fight cancer in women.

The guided missile technique involves using drug-treated sperm to deliver the medicines to tumors deep inside the body.

The revolutionary treatment could help thousands of women affected by cancers of the reproductive system, which can be reached by the drug- carrying sperm. Cancer of the womb kills more than 2,000 women a year in the UK and cervical cancer claims the lives of around 900.

Treatment includes chemotherapy to try to poison the cancer cells before they spread.

But this also damages healthy cells. For years, scientists have been exploring ways to deliver toxic anti-cancer medicines directly to tumor sites, leaving healthy tissues unscathed.

One method used bacteria as a form of transport, as they can penetrate the body easily.

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