Weapon Wednesday – Making Soldiers and Tanks Invisible

3ABCT equipment going green for Atlantic Resolve

Christoph Koppers, Training Support Center Grafenwoehr

The U.S. Army says it will develop technology to block the heat signatures of ground troops and armored vehicles. Army Chief of Staff Mark Milley said the future of warfare, in which soldiers will operate in a “highly lethal” environment, demands that the service develop the means to hide its soldiers. read more

Can You Spot the British Recon Soldiers?

from the Daily Mail:

An incredible image of twelve members of the Household Cavalry hiding in the jungle has had internet users the world over scratching their heads.

The photograph shows a dozen soldiers from one of the British Army’s most elite units camouflaged in the foliage of a forest in Brunei.

The unit posted the photograph along with others on its social media accounts, as it carries out maneuvers in the jungle as part of its specialist training regime. 

The exercise was part of it Close Target Reconnaissance training. One post read: ‘[This] is what the Household Cavalry Regiment does best.

‘The intelligence gathered by this complex, deadly art will determine the British Army’s success in battle. The Cavalry are honing vital skills in the Brunei Jungle that could ultimately save lives on future operations.’

An incredible image of twelve members of the Household Cavalry hiding in the jungle has had internet users the world over scratching their heads

It also posted a Mannequin Challenge on its Facebook page, along with the caption: ‘Our soldiers are currently out in Brunei as part of a month long exercise improving reconnaissance and patrolling skills in the world’s harshest environment. This truly makes them the #TrustedGuardians!’

Did you spot all 12? 

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Natural Camouflage Leaves this American Owl Barely Visible

Owls this for a disguise?

An eastern screech owl is barely visible at  the entrance to a tree hole – thanks to its perfectly evolved camouflage.

These incredible pictures were taken by  photographer Graham McGeorge, 42, in Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia.

Natural camouflage: An eastern screech owl disguised in the hollow of a tree in Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia
An eastern screech owl disguised in  the hollow of a tree in Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia

 

I see YOU: Screech owls are quite common across North America but they generally go unnoticed
 Screech owls are quite common across North  America but they generally go unnoticed

Usually solitary, screech owls nest in a tree  cavity, either natural or excavated by a woodpecker.

They have either rusty or dark grey  intricately patterned plumage with streaking on the underparts, helping them to  blend in perfectly in their woodland homes.

The birds don’t actually build a nests.  Instead, females lay their eggs directly on the layer of fur and feathers left  over from previous meals that lines the bottom of its den.

They are strictly nocturnal, roosting during  the day in cavities or next to tree trunks.

Although quite common, and often be found in  residential areas, they generally go unnoticed.

Hiding place: Usually solitary, screech owls nest in a tree cavity, either natural or dug out by a woodpecker
 Usually solitary, screech owls nest in a  tree cavity, either natural or dug out by a woodpecker

 

Night owl: They are strictly nocturnal, roosting during the day in their cavity nests or next to tree trunks
They are strictly nocturnal, roosting during  the day in their cavity nests or next to tree trunks

‘They are masters of disguise so you need to  have a sharp eye in order to see them,’ he said.

‘I found this one that was living in a hole  in the tree that woodpeckers usually make.

‘They are easily spooked and every slight  movement I made would scare the owl and send it back inside the hole.

‘After 30 minutes or so it would come back  out.’

An eastern screech owl camouflaged in the hollow of a tree in Georgia
An eastern screech owl camouflaged in the hollow of a tree in Georgia
  Their call is a haunting  tremolo with a descending, whinny-like quality

Eastern screech owls are about six to 10-in  tall and found throughout North America.

Despite their name, this owl doesn’t truly  screech; their call is a haunting tremolo with a descending, whinny-like  quality.

They hunt from dusk to dawn.

Attribution: Mail Online