Do We Need an Intelligence Overhaul?

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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No, I’m not talking about the Democrat Party. I think it’s too late for that bunch. I’m of course referring to our federal intelligence services which have become highly politicized, appear to only be interested in protecting the aforementioned democrats, and it seems have become less competent since they’ve become politicized.

The Sandy Hook massacre not withstanding, three of the latest most high profile mass-shootings/bombings have the FBI’s bungling fingerprints all over them.

The Sandy Hook, Adam Lanza, school shooting was bungled by local authorities. They were warned of Lanza’s behavior and threats, and failed to pass it off to the FBI, or similar authority. Locals are not equipped or adept at investigating potential situations prior to them happening.

However, there appears to be a pattern forming in the FBI’s ability or want to follow leads prior to the tragedies occurring.

The FBI failed to keep track of the Boston bomber, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, after they suspected he had become radicalized. The FBI interviewed him in 2011 as a person with terrorist ties, thanks to a tip from Russian intelligence, but never followed up, even after he had several times visited a known radical Islamic Mosque in Dagestan. Dagestan is known to have Islamist training camps.

According to a local police official, a case file on Tsarnaev was then handed over to the FBI along with a request for further information. However, the FBI never replied. read more

Being Christian is Bad for Ones Health

Who didn’t see this coming the minute we left Iraq? Being Christian in the Middle East is a death sentence. I’m just glad Islam is a religion of peace. Just think how bad things would be.

 

BAGHDAD     (AP) — Militants in Iraq targeted Christians in three separate Christmas Day bombings in Baghdad, killing at least 37 people, officials said Wednesday.

In one attack, a car bomb went off near a church in the capital’s southern Dora neighborhood, killing at least 26 people and wounding 38, a police officer said. read more

Obama Slashed Domestic Terror Budget

Have you seen this anywhere in the mainstream, drive-by media? No? And I’m sure you won’t.

from the UK Dail Mail:

Obama administration has SLASHED budget for domestic bombing prevention by 45 per cent, says former Homeland Security Assistant Secretary

 

Barack Obama’s administration has cut the budget nearly in half for preventing domestic bombings, MailOnline can reveal. 

Under President George W. Bush, the Department of Homeland Security had $20 million allocated for preventing the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) by terrorists working inside the United States. The current White House has cut that funding down to $11 million.

That assessment comes from Robert Liscouski, a former Homeland Security Assistant Secretary for Infrastructure Protection, in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings on April 15 that killed three Americans and injured at least 173 others.

He told MailOnline that the Obama-era DHS is, on the whole, about as well-positioned as it was during the Bush administration to handle the aftermath of the April 15 bombings in Boston, ‘but the Obama administration has continued to cut the budget for offices such as the Office for Bombing Prevention from $20 million started under Bush, to $11 million today.’

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World War One Wasteland

The World War One wasteland: Haunting rare images show apocalyptic destruct
ion  on the Western Front

It is could be the scene from a nuclear  holocaust.

A once-thriving city reduced to mere rubble,  a 700-year-old cathedral barely left standing, trees that proudly lined an  idyllic avenue torn to shreds.

There’s barely anyone in sight.

But the devastation wrought in these rare,  haunting images was caused long before the atomic bomb came into  existence.

It is the apocalyptic aftermath of dogged  fighting along the Western Front during World War One when Allied and German  forces tried to shell each other into submission with little success other than  leaving a trail of utter carnage and killing millions.

Apocalypse: This was all that remained of the Belgian town of Ypres in March 1919 after fierce fighting during World War One reduced it to mere rubble
 This was all that remained of the Belgian  town of Ypres in March 1919 after fierce fighting during World War One reduced  it to mere rubble

In rehab: An aerial view of Ypres under construction in 1930 which gives an idea of how the city looked before it was bombarded during the Great War
 An aerial view of Ypres under construction in  1930 which gives an idea of how the city looked before it was bombarded during  the Great War

 

Felled: Trees along an avenue in Locre, Belgium, lie torn to shreds. These images are from a series documenting the devastation caused along the Western Front
 Trees along an avenue in Locre, Belgium, lie  torn to shreds. These images are from a series documenting the devastation  caused along the Western Front

 

Destroyed: The Hotel de Ville in Arras, Northern France, looks more like a medieval ruins after it was heavily shelled during World War One
 The Hotel de Ville in Arras, Northern France,  looks more like a medieval ruins after it was heavily shelled during World War  One

Shaping nature: A huge bomb crater at Messines Ridge in Northern France, photographed circa March 1919, soon after the end of World War One
 A huge bomb crater at Messines Ridge in  Northern France, photographed circa March 1919, soon after the end of World War  One

Reflected glory: A peaceful pond is what remains today of the craters made by massive mines on the Messines Ridge near Ypres. Their explosion was heard in London
A peaceful pond is what remains today  of the craters made by massive mines on the Messines Ridge near  Ypres. Their  explosion was heard in London

The strategically important Belgian  city of  Ypres, which stood in the way of Germany’s planned sweep into  France from the  North, bore the brunt of the onslaught.

At its height, the city was a prosperous  centre of trade in the cloth industry known throughout the world. After the war,  it was unrecognisable.

The Cloth Hall, which was one of the  largest  commercial buildings of the Middle Ages when it served as the city’s main market  for the industry, was left looking like a medieval ruin.

Its stunning cathedral, St Martin’s, fared  little better.

Outside of the towns and cities, the  countryside also cut a sorry sight.

Sorry sight: The Cloth Hall at Ypres, which was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages when it served as the main market for the city's cloth industry
 The Cloth Hall at Ypres, which was one of  the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages when it served as the main  market for the city’s cloth industry

Standing proud: How the Cloth Hall looked just before before the 1st bombardment by the Germans during the first battle of Ypres in October 1914
How the Cloth Hall looked just before  before the 1st bombardment by the Germans during the first battle of Ypres in  October 1914
Doomsday: St Martin's cathedral at Ypres, which was rebuilt using the original plans after the war. At 102 metres (335 ft), it is among the tallest buildings in Belgium
 St Martin’s cathedral at Ypres, which was  rebuilt using the original plans after the war. At 102 metres (335 ft), it is  among the tallest buildings in Belgium

Devastation: St Martin's Cathedral was the seat of the former diocese of Ypres from 1561 to 1801 and is still commonly referred to as such
 St Martin’s Cathedral was the seat of the  former diocese of Ypres from 1561 to 1801 and is still commonly referred to as  such

How it looked before: The cathedral was rebuilt to the original Gothic design, with a spire added, as seen here in 1937
 The cathedral was rebuilt to the  original Gothic design, with a spire added, as seen here in 1937

Barely left standing: The front wall of the Hotel de Ville at Bethune in Northern France as seen after heavy shelling during the war
War of attrition: The destruction was caused by Allied and German forces which tried to shell each other into submission with little success
The front wall of the Hotel de Ville  at Bethune in Northern France (top) and St Martin’s cathedral (bottom) are  barely left standing after heavy shelling
Clear-up effort: The East end of the Nave in the Basilique at Saint-Quentin in Northern France photographed soon after the end of World War One, circa March 1919
 The East end of the Nave in the  Basilique at Saint-Quentin in Northern France photographed soon after the end of  World War One, circa March 1919
The moat and the ramparts at Ypres: The city was the centre of intense and sustained battles between the German and the Allied forces
  The city was the  centre of intense and sustained battles between the German and the Allied  forces

One tree-lined avenue in France was  left  looking like wasteland, while a huge bowl sunken into Messines  ridge near Ypres  is the legacy from the huge explosions of buried  British mines that were heard  160 miles away in London in 1917.

Some 7.5million men lost their lives on the  Western Front during World War One.

The front was opened when the German  army  invaded Luxembourg and Belgium in 1914  and then moved into the  industrial  regions in northern France.

In September of that year, this advance was  halted, and slightly reversed, at the Battle Of Marne.

Wasteland: The canal at Diksmuide in Belgium. The Western Front was opened when the German army invaded Luxembourg and Belgium in 1914
 The canal at Diksmuide in Belgium. The  Western Front was opened when the German army invaded Luxembourg and Belgium in  1914
Shot to pieces: The wreckage of a tank. Some 7.5million men lost their lives on the Western Front during World War One
 The wreckage of a tank. Some 7.5million  men lost their lives on the Western Front during World War One

 

Forlorn: A little girl cuts a sorry figure surrounded by the ruined buildings in the French village of Neuve Eglise, which was heavily bombed
 A little girl cuts a sorry figure surrounded by  the ruined buildings in the French village of Neuve Eglise, which was heavily  bombed

 

In the line of fire: Two soldiers pose for the camera at a Franco-British frontier post in Northern France during the war
 Two soldiers pose for the camera at  a Franco-British frontier post in Northern France during the war

 

It was then that both sides dug vast  networks of trenches that ran all the way from the North Sea to the  Swiss  border with France.

This line of tunnels remained unaltered, give  or take a mile here and a mile there, for most of the four-year  conflict.

By 1917, after years of deadlock that  saw  millions of soldiers killed for zero gain on either side, new  military  technology including poison gas, tanks and planes were deployed  on the  front.

Thanks to these techniques, the Allies slowly  advanced throughout 1918 until the war’s end in November.

But the scars will forever  remain.

 

Attribution: Simon Tomlinson, Mail Online

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2282108/World-War-One-wasteland-Haunting-rare-images-apocalyptic-destruction-Western-Front.html#ixzz2LZqd61hJ Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook