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Weapon Wednesday – Robot Patrol Boat

BAE Systems has completed another series of tests on its Pacific 950 autonomous patrol boat
BAE Systems has completed another series of tests on its Pacific 950 autonomous patrol boat(Credit: BAE Systems)

Targeted at anti-piracy, border control, intelligence gathering and maritime security missions, the Pacific 950 is an autonomous boat that can operate alone for up to 10 days, or cover 300 nautical miles (556 km) at pursuit speed. Its built-in stabilized 12.7-mm weapons system, however, is human-operated. read more

Weapon Wednesday – BAE Prototype Armored Vehicle

The US Army has awarded contracts to develop a prototype armored vehicle for light infantry units
The US Army has awarded contracts to develop a prototype armored vehicle for light infantry units(Credit: BAE Systems)

BAE Systems and General Dynamics have been tapped by the US Army to each build 12 prototype medium-armor vehicles. Part of the Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) program, the two US$376-million contracts aim at developing an agile, multi-terrain platform for Infantry Brigade Combat Teams (IBCT). read more

Weapon Wednesday – BAE’s Advance Hawk

The Advanced Hawk is an updated version of the Hawk T2 shown here
The Advanced Hawk is an updated version of the Hawk T2 shown here (Credit: BAE Systems)

Since it was introduced in 1976, well over a thousand of BAE Systems’ Hawk trainer jets have entered service in 18 countries around the world. Now the latest variant, the Advanced Hawk, has taken to the air for the first time in the skies over Warton, Lancashire, UK in demonstrator form. Boasting a new wing design and a revamped cockpit, the Anglo-Indian two-seater is intended to train pilots to handle fifth-generation combat aircraft. read more

Navy’s New Rail Gun

from RT News:

Prototypes of the US Navy’s much vaunted electromagnetic railguns were unveiled this week. The new technology, capable of firing projectiles at up to 5,600 miles per hour, is set to revolutionize naval warfare.

The Navy demonstrated two working railgun prototypes aboard the USS Millinocket in San Diego, developed by the Office of Naval Research. The high-tech weapons function by using an electrical pulse which creates an electromagnetic force to propel a projectile

In addition to supplementing or replacing traditional artillery aboard Navy vessels, railguns also offer a large price advantage over conventional missiles. Railgun projectiles are believed to cost about $25,000 per unit – 100 times less than traditional missiles, according to Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, Chief of Naval Research. read more