WND Exclusive – Take a toke, man – your town needs the tax money

from Brent Smith for World Net Daily:

There are some odd things going on in our country lately.

Yes, I know that’s a silly open-ended statement and could refer to just about anything these days. But I’m talking about the seeming disconnect between states and the federal government. Or more specifically, the disconnect between state and federal laws.

In this case, the disconnect between federal marijuana laws and that of the states.

Marijuana is considered an illegal substance by the feds, yet at least 11 states have legalized its purchase and consumption – either strictly medically and/or for recreational use.

The United States Constitution is unmistakably clear concerning the relationship of federal and state law.

Article VI, Section 2, states: read more

Texas Is Bizarre – According to the Left

by: the Common Constitutionalist

We all know that the hard-core left loathes the Constitution and the founders who wrote it. After all, virtually everything they think, say and do is unconstitutional.

When you boil it down, the left is for two things: a socialist utopia and a massive central government to manage it.

Leftists like those at ThinkProgress are as hard-core as it gets so I have to laugh when they attempt to use the Constitution to prove a point against the right.

Radical lefty Ian Millhiser at ThinkProgress attempts to do just that, as he posted a piece entitled “A Texas Lawmakers Bizarre Plan to Secede from the Union One Law at a Time.”

Naturally the photo he posted accompanying the article was a Confederate battle flag because people have an immediate visceral hatred for it and what it represents, and of course Texas’s constant use of that particular flag – which was and is… never.

Millhiser’s article explains that “Under an unconstitutional proposal by Texas state representative Dan Flynn (R), just two people in the state of Texas – the state House Speaker and Lieut. Governor – would effectively have the power to suspend any federal law within Texas’s borders, at least temporarily.” read more