Oklahoma Introduces itself to the 10th Amendment

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by: Brent Smith

Fancy that. One (maybe two – North Dakota) out of 50 States has the intelligence and the courage to actually follow the rules.

The other 49 (48) are unaware of what Oklahoma is proposing, complete ignoramuses, going to take a wait-and-see approach, or don’t give a crap what the rule book says. They’re going to do whatever they want and are content to let the feds run roughshod over them, providing they’re working toward the same tyrannical ends.

The rule book being the United States Constitution. It is technically still the rule book, right?

The 10th Amendment is the cornerstone of federalism. It reads as follows:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.

The Constitution, as we all are hopefully aware, grants finite authority to the national or federal government. If this authority is not specifically enumerated in the Constitution, the federal government, not may, but MUST defer to the States and the people. The 10th Amendment merely codifies what should be understood. It’s why James Madison referred to this amendment as “superfluous” (unnecessary). But my anti-federalist heroes insisted on it, and thank heavens they did.

Remember this as you read Daniel Horowitz’s latest brilliant article. I’m a fan, in case you are unaware.

from the Blaze:

Horowitz: Oklahoma House votes to enable legislature to block Biden’s executive orders

Executives are making ‘laws’

James Madison once asserted that “in a republican government, the legislative authority necessarily predominates.” Well, today, only executive power predominates, because federal and state executive agencies seem to be the only ones doing the legislating. As Joe Biden continues to pass sweeping “laws” unilaterally with no authority from Congress, the red states are the only even potential check on his abuse of power. It appears that the state of Oklahoma has now taken up the mantle as the second state to move to block these executive orders.

On Thursday, the Oklahoma House overwhelmingly passed a bill, HB 1236, that would grant the state’s attorney general and state legislature the authority to review the president’s executive orders to determine constitutionality. Specifically, the bill would authorize the legislature to recommend that the attorney general review any executive order, federal agency rule, or federal congressional action to determine whether the state should seek an exemption or declare it unconstitutional. If either the attorney general or the legislature, by concurrent resolution, declares the act unconstitutional, then all state and local officials and any publicly funded organization are prohibited from enforcing it.

The federal actions covered under this bill include any orders pertaining to health emergencies; the regulation of natural resources, agriculture, and land use; infringements upon the Second Amendment; the regulation of the financial sector as it relates to environmental, social, or governance standards, the regulation of education; the regulation of college or school sports; or any other powers reserved by the State of Oklahoma or the people of Oklahoma.

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