Jailhouse Rock

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from: James Daniel at the UK Daily Mail

Tennessee prisoners post Facebook pics and videos of drugs, cash and parties  from behind bars

Whilst the idea of prison is to curtail ones  freedom, it seems that tens of inmates in Tennessee are living life to the max,  behind bars.

Videos and pictures posted to around 100  prisoners personal Facebook pages show the convicts are surrounded by drugs,  money and even get to party, despite being in jail.

Inmates aren’t supposed to have even have  internet access, let alone have their own cell phones which are forbidden in  prisons.

 

 
This is the life! Inmates in West Tennessee jail post photos of themselves having fun whilst in the slammer
This is the life! Inmates in West Tennessee jail post  photos of themselves having fun whilst in the slammer

 

 
Hoarders: He may be banged up, but that doesn't mean this inmate can't enjoy a snack or two, or three...
Hoarders: He may be banged up, but that doesn’t mean  this inmate can’t enjoy a snack or two, or three…

 

A district attorney from West Tennessee says  a change in the law has to occur to prevent postings like this from  happening.

Mike Dunavant has one federal prison, three  state prisons, and five county jails in his district.

He told WAFB that  the prisoners are getting around a loophole in the law.

For although it is illegal to bring a cell  phone into prison, it is not  illegal to posses one once inside.  He says  that law needs to be  changed.

‘It’s certainly  offensive to victims of  crime and to citizens of this state who really  expect inmates will not have  access to the Internet, not have the  luxuries of Facebook as we have,’ Dunavant  said.

He believes the prisoners behaviour to be  disturbing, offensive and dangerous.

One inmate revels in being in the slammed:  ‘Between me and you, this s*** ain’t half bad,’

Burning down the house: It seems the prisoners can get away with virtually anything - here they burn a t-shirt in a cell

Burning down the house: It seems the prisoners can get  away with virtually anything – here they burn a t-shirt in a cell

 
Contraband: Cellphones are not allowed to be brought into jail, but once they are behind bars it's not illegal to own one
Contraband: Cellphones are not allowed to be brought  into jail, but once they are behind bars it’s not illegal to own one

 

The videos show the prisoners taking drugs,  smoking, hoarding snacks, giving each other tattoos, and in one  photograph,  burning clothes inside a cell.

On one video, a convicted murderer, Rivera  Peoples, posted pictures and  video, showing off his contraband iPhone he  somehow got in prison to  operate his Facebook page.

In another, an inmate asks Peoples how much  money has collected while in  prison. Peoples responds, ‘I’m a thousand,  definitely a thousand.’

Other inmates show pictures of large amounts  of cash as well.

One picture shows an inmate showing off $200  while in prison and another shares the photo on his Facebook wall.

Other Facebook videos show inmates watching  TV, singing and rapping.

A convicted burglar Martez Wright posted  videos of his exploits while in jail in Memphis.

He is seen showing off what he claims is  marijuana and then shows off  various junk food and snacks he and his fellow  inmates have managed to  hoard.

Mo money, mo problems: One convict is making a fortune from selling other contraband goods including drugs

Mo money, mo problems: One convict is making a fortune  from selling other contraband goods including drugs

 

 
No dope: A prisoner shows off his marijuana in a Facebook post from behind bars
No dope: A prisoner shows off his marijuana in a  Facebook post from behind bars

‘We’re hungry. About to eat a mother f******  feast. We’ve got scrumptious items we eat on a daily basis,’ Wright  said.

Dunavant proposes stricter security screening  for visitors and a cell signal blocking device inside prisons.

He hopes to have a proposal in place for law  makers to consider when they reconvene in January.

‘Anyone who sees those videos, they’re going  to be sickened by it. They’re  going to be angry,’ said Verna Wyatt, executive  director of Tennessee  Voices for Victims, an advocacy group for crime  victims.

The Channel 4  Newsteam which conducted the original  investigation found inmates using  Facebook not only to communicate instantly  with family and friends, but  also to talk to inmates in other  prisons.

The fear is that despite being off the  streets, the criminals can still organize drug crimes and violent  crimes.

 
Lighting up: A prisoner lights a blunt in the comfort of his cell
Lighting up: A prisoner lights a blunt in the comfort of  his cell

 

On one occasion two inmates at different  prisons contact one another by posting their phone numbers on each others  wall.

Many of the families of the criminals’  victims have said they are outraged at the freedom the inmates are  experiencing.

The victims’ families said when the criminals  were sentenced to prison,  they never imagined them posting photos of themselves  to Facebook  watching TV or burying themselves in junk food.

Plenty of possessions: This inmates cell looks more like the inside of a student's dorm room with books, clothes and food all on display

Plenty of possessions: This inmates cell looks more like  the inside of a student’s dorm room with books, clothes and food all on  display

 

 
Living it up: A prisoner shows the marijuana bags he has for sale behind the prison walls
Living it up: A prisoner shows the marijuana bags he has  for sale behind the prison walls

Convicted murderer Brandon White, who killed  Ryan Wright, posted pictures of his phone and holding $200 cash.

Ryan’s mother, Linda Wright told Channel 4:  ‘That’s not punishment. That’s not any kind of punishment. It’s just like being  out on the outside. It’s still freedom for them. We can never communicate again.  And he [Brandon White] has access to be able to communicate with the outside  world.’

The Department of Correction says every  correctional facility struggles with contraband.

Some of the prisoners who have made postings  online are now being investigated, especially those who are seen to be flaunting  drugs.

The Tennessee Department of Corrections says  70 inmates at 14 prisons across the state have been disciplined and their  offending Facebook pictures have now been removed.

 

About the Common Constitutionalist

Brent, aka The Common Constitutionalist, is a Constitutional Conservative, and advocates for first principles, founders original intent and enemy of progressives. He is former Navy, Martial Arts expert. As well as publisher of the Common Constitutionalist blog, he also is a contributing writer for Political Outcast, Godfather Politics, Minute Men News (Liberty Alliance), Freedom Outpost, the Daily Caller, Vision To America and Free Republic. He also writes an exclusive weekly column for World Net Daily (WND).

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