Joke of the Day

Three Native American, Elite Reconnaissance Marines were out in the Afghani desert.

“I understand that you Native Americans have brought your own indigenous survival equipment,” ventured their battalion commander.

“Sir, I have brought an entire barrel cactus,” said the Yavapai warrior proudly. “When I get too hot, I just cut off the top and take a drink.” read more

Do We Need Transparency at the CBO

from the Washington Examiner:

Mick Mulvaney isn’t pleased with the power wielded by his competitor, the Congressional Budget Office. You can chalk that up in part to a natural rivalry between the CBO and Mulvaney’s Office of Management and Budget, which is an arm of the White House. Mulvaney also highlights some reasons everyone concerned with good policy should want reform at CBO.

“At some point, you’ve got to ask yourself, has the day of the CBO come and gone?” Mulvaney told the Washington Examiner‘s writers and editors in a recent meeting at the White House complex. Mulvaney specifically tore into a CBO staffer who helped give the Republican healthcare bill a bad score. read more

Students and Faculty Turn on Professor

from Heat Street: 

Snowflakes of Color

The faculty at Evergreen State College sent a letter to students Friday saying they stand behind the protesters who have wreaked havoc on the campus this week and plan to pursue disciplinary action against the target of their demonstrations, Prof. Brett Weinstein.

The Washington college of about 4,000 students erupted in protests last week after Weinstein, a biology professor, told student activists he did not agree with their “Day of Absence” plans. The Day of Absence usually consists of students of color leaving the campus for the day, to bring awareness to their presence and issues. This year, however, student activists wanted all white students and faculty to leave for the day. Weinstein, who supported the Day of Absence tradition in the past, called this year’s plan an act of oppression. read more

Podcast – The Scam of Rising Sea Levels

The Paris Climate hoax has been front page news for days. The left has predictably gone bat-crap crazy over Trump’s decision to pull out.

So the hysterical warmists have taken to airwaves to promote their latest apocalyptic warning, that unless we sign on to the Paris Wealth-Distribution Treaty (and that’s what it really is), the sea levels will rise and we will all be swept away.

This dire warning is of course yet another lie concocted by alarmists posing as climate scientists – a lie which the eminent sea level scientist, Dr. Nils-Axel Mörner, has proven.

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The Business of Climate Change and the Rise of the Oceans

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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In 2015, Takepart.com posted an article  citing what coastal cities will look like after the sea levels rise.

They write that, “Sea-level rise is coming. Even if we keep global temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius above historic norms—the benchmark for avoiding catastrophic climate warming—we may still see oceans creep four feet farther inland by 2100 and rise 20 feet by as soon as 2200.”

I like the hysteric hyperbole – “catastrophic climate warming” and the fact (or non-fact) that we “may” still see oceans rising – which can equally mean that we may not. It’s a trick the warming alarmists always use figuring most will not pick up the “may” and instead hear “will.” And if you buy into this nonsense, this is what you hear.

The article cites a study published in the journal Science, where researchers compared CO2 levels of today with the last time they claim the levels were similar. It was apparently 120,000 years ago when the level was roughly the same as today, at approximately 400ppm.

They claim that, “Back then, the average global temperature was around 1 to 2 degrees higher than it is now, and the sea level was about 20 feet higher.” read more

Dinosaur Tooth Could Change American History

A chance discovery of a single tooth in Mississippi provides the first evidence of an animal closely related to Triceratops in eastern North America.

Until now, most experts believed North America was split by a vast sea.

However, this rare 68 to 66 million-year-old tooth suggests there was a bridge between the two sides.

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Until now, experts believed North America was split by a sea but this rare 68 to 66 million-year-old tooth (pictured), found in Mississippi suggests there was a bridge between the two sides

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There Can be NO Renegotiation of the Paris Wealth-Distribution Treaty

by: the Common Constitutionalist

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President Trump has officially pulled us out of the Paris Wealth-Distribution Treaty. Hooray for the President!

Yesterday, as many have heard, Trump said: “In order to fulfill my solemn duty to protect America and its citizens, the United States will withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord…”

Well that’s terrific, or at least it would have been if he had ended there and simply said “thank you and have a nice day.” But he didn’t. His campaign promise was to pull out completely and leave it at that.

Yet he kind of left the door open by next saying: “…but begin negotiations to reenter either the Paris Accord or really an entirely new transaction, on terms that are fair to the United States, its businesses, its workers, its people, its taxpayers…”

Well, kudos to the President for mentioning “its taxpayers.” When have we heard a President mention the people who fit the bill when discussing international affairs? I certainly don’t recall a time. read more

First Video Tombstone

The world’s first digital tombstone featuring a 48-inch touchscreen has been unveiled in Slovenia.

Installed in a cemetery in Maribor, Slovenia’s second largest city, the futuristic gravestone can show pictures, video and other digital content.

And the weather-proof device is available for sale now for 3,000 euros ($3,189; £2,588), according to its creators.

A Slovenian citizen looks at the world's first digital tombstone at the Pobrezje cemetery in Maribor, Slovenia

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