This is Camping?

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Have you ever tried camping over a ravine  with nothing but a few ropes and wires between you a 420-foot drop?

Well, as these fearless friends will tell  you… the experience is highly in-tents.

Slackliner Andy Lewis and 11 of his friends  swapped picnics for parachutes on a  daredevil adventure aboard a ‘midair campsite’ in Moab, Utah.

Highly in-tents: Slackliner Andy Lewis and seven of his friends swapped picnics for parachutes on a daredevil adventure aboard a 'midair campsite' in Moab, Utah
 Slackliner Andy Lewis and seven of his  friends swapped picnics for parachutes on a daredevil adventure aboard a ‘midair  campsite’ in Moab, Utah
Complex job: The majority of the system was connected on the ground and needed 12 people rigging at the same time to pull it into the air
 The majority of the system was connected on  the ground and needed 12 people rigging at the same time to pull it into the  air

He said: ‘The best thing is that you are high  enough to parachute off the net. You can literally step out of your tent, fall  off the net, and fly away.

‘I am totally intrigued by the height. It is  frustratingly scary and quite distracting.

‘It causes a unique and challenging focus  that becomes addicting.’

Lewis, who goes by the nickname Sketchy Andy,  even slept in the tent overnight with his fiancee Hayley Ashburn.

‘I brought out dinner, pillows, beer, smokes,  and movies,’ said the 26-year-old from San Francisco, USA.

‘We had a wonderfully romantic and incredibly  memorable and beautiful night.’

Monkey madness: Lewis came up with the 'net' plan four years ago but it was only this year that he managed to finally build it - with the help of fellow adventurers the Moab Monkeys
 Lewis came up with the ‘net’ plan four  years ago but it was only this year that he managed to finally build it – with  the help of fellow adventurers the Moab Monkeys

 

Fun in the air: The crew took turns highlining, base-jumping and falling 350ft on a rope swing
 The crew took turns highlining,  base-jumping and falling 350ft on a rope swing

Lewis, who hit headlines when he performed  alongside Madonna at the 2012 NFL Super Bowl, came up with the ‘net’ plan four  years ago.

But it was only this year that he managed to  finally build it – with the help of fellow adventurers the Moab  Monkeys.

The majority of the system was connected on  the ground and needed 12 people rigging at the same time to pull it into the  air.

The slacklines were 55m, 60m and 70m long and  the entire network – weighing 300lbs – took 24 hours to secure.

They named it the ‘Space Thong’ – because of  its resemblance to a giant G-string.

'Space thong': The slacklines were 55m, 60m and 70m long and the entire network - weighing 300lbs - took 24 hours to secure
The slacklines were 55m, 60m and 70m long  and the entire network – weighing 300lbs – took 24 hours to secure

The crew then took turns highlining,  base-jumping and falling 350ft on a rope swing.

Lewis, who owns climbing equipment firm  Slackline Brothers, described the experience as ‘unbelievable’.

‘It is a fabricated emotion of a near-death  experience. It lets you know what is important in your life.

‘Mostly I think about my life and the lives  of my friends. I think about keeping everyone safe mostly, then combining that  with the most dangerous activities.

‘It’s a wonderful paradox indeed. Falling  down 350ft on a couple of ropes can be deadly. But when done right, it can be  amazingly fun, and a reliable way to stay safe while being able to feel the fear  of falling.

Attribution: Mail Online

About the Common Constitutionalist

Brent, aka The Common Constitutionalist, is a Constitutional Conservative, and advocates for first principles, founders original intent and enemy of progressives. He is former Navy, Martial Arts expert. As well as publisher of the Common Constitutionalist blog, he also is a contributing writer for Political Outcast, Godfather Politics, Minute Men News (Liberty Alliance), Freedom Outpost, the Daily Caller, Vision To America and Free Republic. He also writes an exclusive weekly column for World Net Daily (WND).