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Coconut Husk Inspires New Building

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A cross-section of a coconut (right), showing its exocarp, mesocarp, endocarp and seedling
A cross-section of a coconut (right), showing its exocarp, mesocarp, endocarp and seedling (Credit: Plant Biomechanics Group Freiburg)

If you’ve ever tried cracking open a coconut, then you’re no doubt aware of how structurally strong they are.

Well, scientists from Germany’s University of Freiburg recently analyzed coconut shells, to see what makes them so tough. Their findings could lead the way to building materials that are better able to withstand earthquakes.

Coconut shells consist of three distinct layers: the leathery exocarp on the outside, the fibrous mesocarp in the middle, and the hard endocarp on the inside, which protects the developing seedling at the heart of the coconut.

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About the Common Constitutionalist

Brent, aka The Common Constitutionalist, is a Constitutional Conservative, and advocates for first principles, founders original intent and enemy of progressives. He is former Navy, Martial Arts expert. As well as publisher of the Common Constitutionalist blog, he also is a contributing writer for Political Outcast, Godfather Politics, Minute Men News (Liberty Alliance), Freedom Outpost, the Daily Caller, Vision To America and Free Republic. He also writes an exclusive weekly column for World Net Daily (WND).

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