Supernova Explodes With the Force of 100 Million Suns

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Astronomers have discovered signs of a massive stellar explosion 30 million years ago that would have produced the equivalent force of millions of suns blowing up all at once.

The ancient star would have ballooned to 200 times the size of the sun and the epic blast would have spewed out material into the universe at 36 million kilometres an hour (22.4 million mph).

Researchers believe that their analysis of the supernova, which has been visible in the night sky since 2013, can teach us more about the violent deaths of stars in the universe.

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Astronomers have discovered signs of a massive stellar explosion 30 million years ago which would have produced the equivalent force of millions of suns blowing up all at once. Stock image. The team studied observations of the explosion, called Supernova 2013ej, taken by a number of telescopes
Astronomers have discovered signs of a massive stellar explosion 30 million years ago which would have produced the equivalent force of millions of suns blowing up all at once. Stock image. The team studied observations of the explosion, called Supernova 2013ej, taken by a number of telescopes

The international team, led by researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, have analysed the aftermath of the massive star’s end, which exploded in the distant M74 galaxy.

It is so far away that light from the supernova took 30 million years to reach Earth.

‘There are so many characteristics we can derive from the early data,’ said Govinda Dhungana, lead author of the study.

‘This was a big massive star, burning tremendous fuel. When it finally reached a point its core couldn’t support the gravitational pull inward, suddenly it collapsed and then exploded.’

The huge supernova, called SN2013ej is believed to be the remnants of an star 30 million light years away in the M74 galaxy (illustrated). Measurements show that the star was far less dense to begin with, at just 15 times the mass of the sun
The huge supernova, called SN2013ej is believed to be the remnants of an star 30 million light years away in the M74 galaxy (illustrated). Measurements show that the star was far less dense to begin with, at just 15 times the mass of the sun

The team studied observations of the explosion, called Supernova 2013ej, taken by a number of telescopes, which capture the corner of the cosmos before the explosion up to 450 days afterwards.

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Brent, aka The Common Constitutionalist, is a Constitutional Conservative, and advocates for first principles, founders original intent and enemy of progressives. He is former Navy, Martial Arts expert. As well as publisher of the Common Constitutionalist blog, he also is a contributing writer for Political Outcast, Godfather Politics, Minute Men News (Liberty Alliance), Freedom Outpost, the Daily Caller, Vision To America and Free Republic. He also writes an exclusive weekly column for World Net Daily (WND).