Blood Pressure Medicine for Longer Life

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Preclinical research suggests a drug used to treat hypertension may offer lifespan-extending effects by helping activate a mitochondrial repair process
Preclinical research suggests a drug used to treat hypertension may offer lifespan-extending effects by helping activate a mitochondrial repair process

Scientists from Osaka City University have found metolazone, an anti-hypertension drug that has been around for almost 50 years, can kickstart a lifespan-extending cellular repair process in roundworms. The research suggests this mechanism could be translatable to humans, offering new research pathways in the search for an anti-aging drug.

Mitochondria are tiny structures that act like cellular power plants. As we age mitochondria become increasingly dysfunctional and, in the search for lifespan-extending medicines, some scientists are looking at ways to repair these fundamental structures.

When mitochondria are damaged a process called mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) is sometimes triggered. This mechanism involves the repair of mitochondria, and some anti-aging researchers suspect we could live longer if this process could be activated by taking a drug.

“Even though aging is not a disease, drugs may slow down aging and mitigate or prevent its negative effects on our health,” says Eriko Kage-Nakadai, one of the scientists working on the new research.

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Brent, aka The Common Constitutionalist, is a Constitutional Conservative, and advocates for first principles, founders original intent and enemy of progressives. He is former Navy, Martial Arts expert. As well as publisher of the Common Constitutionalist blog, he also is a contributing writer for Political Outcast, Godfather Politics, Minute Men News (Liberty Alliance), Freedom Outpost, the Daily Caller, Vision To America and Free Republic. He also writes an exclusive weekly column for World Net Daily (WND).