A Potential Cure for Glaucoma

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A new study shows that removal of or incisions in a membrane in the eye could improve glaucoma treatments
A new study shows that removal of or incisions in a membrane in the eye could improve glaucoma treatments

Glaucoma is a serious eye disease that can gradually cause vision loss, which is currently irreversible. But in a new cell culture study scientists found that removing a membrane at the back of the eye could help transplanted cells migrate into the optic nerve and repair the connections, potentially restoring lost vision.

Retinal ganglion cells sit at the back of the eye and make up the optic nerve with their long tendril-like axons, transmitting visual information to the brain. But the inner eye pressure associated with glaucoma can damage these cells, and if left untreated even kill them, resulting in vision loss.

“That’s why it is so important to detect glaucoma early,” says Thomas Johnson, an author of the new study. “We know a lot about how to treat glaucoma and help nerve cells survive an injury, but once the cells die off, the damage to someone’s vision becomes permanent.”

For the new study, researchers at Johns Hopkins investigated ways to repair damage to optic nerve cells by growing and implanting new cells. First the team grew mouse retinas in lab dishes, then introduced human retinal ganglion cells to see how well they might integrate.

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About the Common Constitutionalist

Brent, aka The Common Constitutionalist, is a Constitutional Conservative, and advocates for first principles, founders original intent and enemy of progressives. He is former Navy, Martial Arts expert. As well as publisher of the Common Constitutionalist blog, he also is a contributing writer for Political Outcast, Godfather Politics, Minute Men News (Liberty Alliance), Freedom Outpost, the Daily Caller, Vision To America and Free Republic. He also writes an exclusive weekly column for World Net Daily (WND).