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The Old New Land Rover Defender

The prototype Land Rover Defender during trials in the Arctic
The prototype Land Rover Defender during trials in the Arctic(Credit: Jaguar Land Rover)

In 2016 we reported the end of the Defender line. Jaguar Land Rover even had a big, teary party to farewell the then 68 year old icon. Well, it seems you can’t keep a good marque down and the long-awaited replacement for the Defender is … the Defender. read more

Russia’s Belgorod Submarine

Belgorod nuclear submarine launched in Severodvinsk

Oleg KuleshovGetty Images

Russia launched the world’s longest submarine today, the special mission submarine Belgorod. Designed to support a variety of military missions, including the Poseidon long-range strategic nuclear torpedo, the sub is far larger than anything operated by any other naval force, including the U.S. Navy. The six hundred foot long submarine displaces more water than a World War I battleship and can dive to a depth of 1,700 feet. read more

A Game of Thrones Dark Night

The massive dark night battle illustrated the limits of compression technology
The massive dark night battle illustrated the limits of compression technology(Credit: HBO)

After months of teasing Game of Thrones recently aired what purportedly was the biggest and longest battle sequence in film history. But as soon as the episode aired the internet started to echo with criticism the battle was too dark and incoherent. While the makers adamantly claim the visual darkness in the episode was an intentional creative choice an enormous volume of fans are upset they couldn’t properly see what was going on. read more

Is Soylent Green Really that Fantastic?

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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The other day, an internet article jumped off the screen at me.

It was posted on the progressive, Seattle PI website, and was entitled, “After death: Washington state set to become the first to allow human composting.”

That’s right. “Seattleites will likely soon have a unique option to remember their loved ones after they die. Washington state is set to become the first to allow “natural organic reduction” as a burial alternative — commonly referred to as human composting — as a bill legalizing the process was approved by the legislature and now heads to Gov. Jay Inslee’s desk.”

“Democratic Sen. Jamie Pedersen of Seattle sponsored the bill because he said it makes sense — it’s a low environmental impact way to dispose of remains. ‘We can show the way for the world about a better way in dealing with this universal human experience,’ Pedersen said in a tweet. …composting bodies could allow for the deceased to give back. The process will turn a body into soil within weeks.”

Katrina Spade, CEO of Recompose, said that, “Americans are largely faced with two options after death: cremation and burial. Burial takes up a lot of space, and those buried can own their plots forever, which is not sustainable. Cremation releases greenhouse gases and particulates. But composting bodies could allow for the deceased to give back.

Now, to help save the planet, instead of burying or cremating grandma, you can have her ground up and made into compost. What a great and enlightened idea. read more

New Aston has Seven on the Floor

A 7-speed manual transmission and carbon ceramic brakes are standard on the Vantage AMR
A 7-speed manual transmission and carbon ceramic brakes are standard on the Vantage AMR(Credit: Aston Martin)

America considers itself a great car loving nation and yet, according to a U.S. News and World Report study, only 18 percent of American drivers even know how to use a manual transmission, and only about 5 percent of vehicles sold in the US in 2016 had three pedals. To much of the rest of the Western world, knowing how to drive stick is a point of considerable pride, and many serious enthusiasts feel that driving automatics removes a key element of connection with the car. read more

New Teeth Cleaning Robots

With precise, controlled movements, the microrobot cleans biofilm off a glass plate
With precise, controlled movements, the microrobot cleans biofilm off a glass plate(Credit:Geelsu Hwang and Edward Steager)

An army of tiny robots scuttling about inside your mouth cleaning your teeth. It’s a disquieting thought, and yet it might be one of the most effective ways to deal with the sticky bacterial biofilms that coat our choppers – as well as water pipes, catheters and other tough-to-clean items. read more

AI Catheter to Assist Heart Surgeons

In a procedure known as a paravalvular aortic leak closure, the catheter is used to help...

In a procedure known as a paravalvular aortic leak closure, the catheter is used to help plug a leak in an artificial heart valve(Credit: Pierre Dupont / Boston Children’s Hospital)

For some time now, we’ve seen robotic surgical devices that can be remotely guided within the human body. And while they do make surgery more precise and less invasive, they still have to be continuously operated by a surgeon. Recently, however, a robotic catheter successfully navigated beating pig hearts on its own. read more

Weapon Wednesday – Blues Angels to Replace Old F/A-18C Hornet

Blue Angels Air Show Live

ED PERLSTEINGETTY IMAGES

The Blue Angels are getting new jets for their 75th anniversary—kind of.

The Navy’s flight demonstration team will move from the older F/A-18C Hornet to the newer F/A-18E/F Super Hornet for the 2021 flight show season. read more

Vaccine for Colorectal Cancer may be Just Over the Horizon

A vaccine for colorectal cancer is all set for larger human trials to commence later this...
A vaccine for colorectal cancer is all set for larger human trials to commence later this year after success in a Phase I trial(Credit: lightsource/Depositphotos)

Positive early results from the first phase of human testing for a unique colorectal cancer vaccine are proving promising. A newly published study outlining the Phase I trial results suggests the vaccine is safe, and stimulates immune activation, paving the way for larger human trials. read more

Promising New Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

An illustration of a healthy neuron, with its sausage-link-like myelin sheath
An illustration of a healthy neuron, with its sausage-link-like myelin sheath(Credit:tigatelu/Depositphotos)

In multiple sclerosis, the body’s immune system attacks and damages myelin, which is the insulating layer on nerves in the spinal cord, brain and optic nerve. This causes the nerves to short-circuit and cease functioning properly. In “a potential game-changer,” scientists have now demonstrated that a synthetic molecule can restore compromised myelin. read more