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Video Podcast – Another Global Warming Study Debunked

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

Okay, so let’s talk global warming again. Wish there was some.

What I’ll be discussing today could be another cold, calculated attempt to try to convince us that global warming is happening and it’s all man’s fault, or we can just chalk it up to simply human error and definitely not intentional.

Gee, I wonder which side I come down on.

Global warming alarmists dressed up in white science lab coats are at it again. And as predictably as the sun rising in the East, global warming activists dressed up as journalists are giving the latest alarmist “research” paper unwavering and uncontested support and coverage.

But there is one brave soul – one brave scientist who had the courage to look at the research study objectively and release his own conclusions. read more

California Wildfires Were 100 Years in the Making

by: Brent Smith at the Common Constitutionalist

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I think all would agree that the California wildfires have been a tragic loss to life and property. The devastation caused has been

Prescribed Burn

nothing short of catastrophic. Video and pictures of the town of Paradise should cause anyone’s heart to sink.

However, this is not a disaster born of natural causes, but human-caused, and most of these wildfires could have been mitigated if not prevented all together, should the State of California and the federal government have heeded decades old warnings.

The federal government, for a century or so, has been taking various States’ forested lands in order to prevent mining, logging and “urban sprawl.” There goal is to keep these forests as pristine as possible, unaltered by human hands.

In February, 2018, California’s Little Hoover Commission published an 82 page report entitled “Fire on the Mountain: Rethinking Forest Management in the Sierra Nevada.” read more

Intelligent Crows Make Tools

Birds of the corvid family are known to be smart, but scientists have now uncovered a...
Birds of the corvid family are known to be smart, but scientists have now uncovered a clever new ability they can use to retrieve food(Credit: EBFoto/Depositphotos)

Crows and their close relatives ravens are known to be quite intelligent, with scientific experiments showing how they can hitch rides on bald eagles and remember the faces of captors. New research has now uncovered a previously unknown ability, with crows being observed building tools from multiple parts for the first time ever. read more

The Indestructible Cockroach

A new Japanese study reveals that the female American cockroach's penchant for co-operation could explain why...
A new Japanese study reveals that the female American cockroach’s penchant for co-operation could explain why there are so many of them(Credit: smuayc/Depositphotos)

They’ve been around for the past 300 million years, outlasting the dinosaurs and teaming up with evolution to outsmart our attempts to get rid of them. Now, Japanese researchers at Hokkaido University have revealed yet another reason why we have been unable to put a dent in their populations: female solidarity. read more

Mammoth Park in Siberia

An artist's impression of an Ice Age ecosystem – similar to the one that Pleistocene Park...
An artist’s impression of an Ice Age ecosystem – similar to the one that Pleistocene Park is trying to recreate(Credit: Mauricio Antón/CC BY 2.5)

A real-world Jurassic Park is never going to happen, but shooting for a more recent prehistoric era might be more achievable. The Pleistocene Park project is aiming to rebuild a lost Ice Age ecosystem in Siberia, and its directors, the father-and-son team of Sergey and Nikita Zimov, say it could help slow the effects of climate change. Now, the initiative is running a crowdfunding campaign to help transport a new herd of animals to the park. read more

Lobsters are the Key To Jellyfish Blooms

A deep sea image showing a Norway lobster munching on a jellyfish
A deep sea image showing a Norway lobster munching on a jellyfish(Credit: Heriot-Watt University)

Jellyfish blooms are regarded by some as an ecological menace, but they may sound the dinner gong for the commercially valuable Norway lobster. Recently, a team of scientists from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh have photographed the tasty crustacean in the waters off western Norway chowing down on jellyfish carcasses, suggesting that they could form a major part of its diet.

The 25-cm (10-in) Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus), also known as the Dublin Bay prawn, langoustine, or scampi, is the most important commercial crustacean in Europe, responsible for revenues of £78 million (US$105 million) to Scotland alone. They’re remarkably abundant in the north-eastern Atlantic and parts of the Mediterranean, and they’re cheaper than the larger common lobster. Each year 60,000 tonnes of them are hauled in with half taken in British waters. read more

Oldest Tsunami Victim Discovered

A 6,000-year-old human skull discovered in a swamp almost a century ago could be from the world’s earliest known tsunami victim.

In 1929, Australian geologist Paul Hossfeld stumbled on a partial human skull in a mangrove outside the coastal town of Aitape in Papua New Guinea.

Originally thought to belong to Homo erectus, the skull was subsequently dated to the mid-Holocene period.

New research into the area the skull was buried in suggests the individual fell victim to a violent ancient tsunami.

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In 1929, Australian geologist Paul Hossfeld stumbled on a partial human skull (pictured) in a mangrove outside the coastal town of Aitape in Papua New Guinea. New research into the area the skull was buried suggests the individual fell victim to a violent ancient tsunami

read more

Orange Peels Revitalize Forest

On the right is the lush forest that was loaded with orange peel waste and on ...
On the right is the lush forest that was loaded with orange peel waste and on the left is the untreated land (Credit: Tim Treuer) 

Sixteen years after a controversial biodegradation plan allowed 1,000 truckloads of orange peels to be unloaded onto a barren, deforested area of Costa Rican land, a team of Princeton researchers has discovered unexpectedly positive results. The area that was covered with orange waste is now a lush, overgrown forest with richer soil and more tree species than the adjacent land that was untreated. read more

Italy’s Tiny Volcano

It is known as ‘The Volcano of Monte Busca’, and the smallest in Italy – barely more than a small pile of rocks on a hill.

It has been attracting tourists for decades, with thousands making the climb up the slope near Tredozio village, Province of Forli, every year.

However, while it falls under the definition of ‘volcano’, the four-foot-high burning mound has no crater and expels none of the lava commonly associated with the term.

The littlest volcano: The volcano of Monte Busca, located in the Province of Forli near Tredozio village, is the smallest in Italy

Hardly Vesuvio:  The flame burns day and night, come rain or shine,  as a result of natural gases from under the surface

Burning bright: The volcano of Monte Busca's bright flame is most visible at night against a dark sky

The volcano of Monte Busca is a natural gas vent.

Hydrogen gases from underneath the surface burn when they come in contact with oxygen, causing the flame on the mountain to burn day and night.

The natural phenomenon is also known as ‘flaming fountain’.

Flaming mountain: The fire is caused by hydrogen gas, which burns when it comes into contact with oxygen 

Yellowstone Super-Caldera Has Deformed

As small earthquakes continue to rumble around the Yellowstone supervolcano in Wyoming, scientists have revealed new evidence of the changes going on beneath the ground.

A new map from the US Geological Survey shows how the ground around the Yellowstone caldera has deformed over the span of two years, as the quakes release uplift-causing pressure, allowing the ground to sink back down.

This activity is typically linked to changes in magma and gases deep below the surface – but for now, the experts say there’s no cause for worry.

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In the map above, a bulls-eye shaped section of uplift can be seen at the Norris Geyser Basin, where the ground has risen roughly 3 inches. And, an elliptical subsidence can be seen in the Yellowstone caldera, with the ground dropping about 1.2 inches

EARTHQUAKE SWARM 

The University of Utah’s Seismograph Stations (UUSS) have been monitoring the activity since it began June 12.

A total of 1,562 quakes have been recorded so far at Yellowstone since the swarm began.

Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise about 50 per cent of the total activity in the Yellowstone region.

Although the latest swarm is the largest since 2012, it is fewer than weekly counts during similar events in 2002, 2004, 2008 and 2010. 

Tremors were recorded from ground level to 9mi (14.5km) below sea level.

Seismic activity could be a sign of an impending eruption of the supervolcano, although this is impossible to predict exactly

The map, created by USGS geophysicist Chuck Wicks uses data from June 2015 and July 2017 to show how the region around Yellowstone has changed.

In the map, the colourful rings show the changes in the ground’s elevation as seen by a radar satellite, according to USGS.

A bulls-eye shaped section of uplift can be seen at the Norris Geyser Basin, where the ground has risen roughly 3 inches.

And, an elliptical subsidence can be seen in the Yellowstone caldera, with the ground dropping about 1.2 inches.

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